Clinical Trials Using Plerixafor

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Plerixafor. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • MGTA-145 and Plerixafor for the Mobilization of Stem Cells for Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the effect of MGTA-145 when given together with plerixafor in mobilizing stem cells (helping push stem cells out of the bone marrow into the blood) so they can be collected and used for stem cell transplant for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma. All of the cells of the immune system including red cells, white cells and platelets are made in the bone marrow. All of these cells develop from a type of cell found in the bone marrow called a "hematopoietic stem cell." This is the type of cell collected for blood and marrow transplantation. In order to collect enough hematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow to make a successful transplant, cells have to be moved from the bone marrow to the blood. Once they are in the blood, they can be collected during a procedure called ‘apheresis’. Currently this requires several days of different medicines (4-5 days) and several days of apheresis. MGTA-145 and plerixafor are drugs that help push stem cells out of the bone marrow into the blood. Giving MGTA-145 together with plerixafor, may allow doctors to collect the necessary number of stem cells for future transplant in less time and with less side effects than the standard mobilization procedure.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Plerixafor and Cemiplimab for the Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the possible benefits of plerixafor and cemiplimab in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Plerixafor is a small molecule drug made in the laboratory that works by blocking a protein called CXCR4. CXCR4 is present on some cells in the immune system that is believed to play a role in helping cancer escape the immune system. Drugs that block CXCR4 may stop these immune cells from being shut down, allowing them to help the body destroy tumor cells. Cemiplimab is an anti-PD-1 antibody. It works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1. PD-1 is a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Antibodies that block PD-1 can potentially prevent PD-1 from shutting down the immune system, thus allowing immune cells to recognize and destroy tumor cells. Giving plerixafor and cemiplimab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of BIVV003 for Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    This is an open label, multicenter, Phase 1 / 2 study in approximately eight adults with severe Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). The study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using BIVV003.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan

  • Genetically Engineered PBMC and PBSC Expressing NY-ESO-1 TCR after a Myeloablative Conditioning Regimen to Treat Patients with Advanced Cancer

    This phase I clinical trial evaluates the safety and feasibility of administering NY-ESO-1 TCR engineered peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after a myeloablative conditioning regimen to treat patients with cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (advanced). The conditioning chemotherapy makes room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood cells (PBMC) and blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Giving NY-ESO-1 TCR PBMC and stem cells after the conditioning chemotherapy is intended to replace the immune system with new immune cells that have been redirected to attack and kill the cancer cells and thereby improve immune system function against cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Whole Brain Radiation Therapy with Standard Temozolomide Chemo-Radiotherapy and Plerixafor in Treating Patients with Glioblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well whole brain radiation therapy works with standard temozolomide chemo-radiotherapy and plerixafor in treating patients with glioblastoma (brain tumor). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Plerixafor is a drug that may prevent recurrence of glioblastoma after radiation treatment. Giving whole brain radiation therapy with standard temozolomide chemo-radiotherapy and plerixafor may work better in treating patients with glioblastoma.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • A Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of bb1111 in Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    This is a non-randomized, open label, multi-site, single dose, Phase 1 / 2 study in approximately 50 adults and adolescents with severe SCD. The study will evaluate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) using bb1111 (also known as LentiGlobin BB305 Drug Product for SCD).
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Plerixafor in Increasing CD34+ Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of plerixafor in increasing cluster of differentiation 34 (CD34) blood forming cell (hematopoietic progenitor cell) count in patients with sickle cell disease. Plerixafor may help move CD34 cells from the bone marrow to the blood. These cells are then collected, changed in the laboratory to make normal oxygen carrying molecules (hemoglobin) in red blood cells and then given back to the patient.
    Location: 2 locations