Clinical Trials Using Prednisone

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Prednisone. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 110

  • Blinatumomab in Combination with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy for the Treatment of Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the activity and side effects of blinatumomab in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and corticosteroids in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blinatumomab is a bispecific antibody that binds to two different proteins—one on the surface of cancer cells and one on the surface of cells in the immune system. An antibody is a protein made by the immune system to help fight infections and other harmful processes / cells / molecules. Blinatumomab may bind to the cancer cell and a T cell (which plays a key role in the immune system's fighting response) at the same time. Blinatumomab may strengthen the immune system's ability to fight cancer cells by activating the body's own immune cells to destroy the tumor. TKI therapy may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Corticosteroids are naturally occurring hormones that have immune suppressive effect and are used to treat some side effects of cancer and its treatment. Giving blinatumomab in combination with corticosteroid and TKI therapy may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to corticosteroid and TKI therapy alone.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • PK and Dose Escalation and Expansion Study of DST-2970

    This is a Phase I multi-center, open-label, study of DST-2970 to determine the MTD, overall safety / tolerability, PK / pharmacodynamic parameters, and efficacy in prostate cancer patients.The study will include a dose escalation phase followed by a dose expansion phase. Each cohort will consist of a "run-in" period to assess pharmacokinetic trough, as well as C1hour, C2hour, and C3hour levels of standard of care abiraterone acetate, followed by a minimum of an 80-hour washout (treatment delay), then initiation of treatment with DST-2970. The patient population that will be evaluated in this study include patients with castration sensitive or castration resistant prostate cancer who experience a rising PSA, with or without radiographic progression, while taking abiraterone acetate. In this protocol, "initial PSA response to abiraterone" is defined as having a ≥ 30% drop in PSA levels (confirmed by a second PSA level one month later) during the first 6 months of treatment with abiraterone. These patients who subsequently experience a rise in PSA while on abiraterone are considered as having "acquired resistance" to abiraterone in the context of this protocol. Patients not meeting the definition of having an "initial PSA response to abiraterone" are considered as having "primary resistance" to abiraterone in the context of the protocol. In the dose escalation phase, all patients with a rising PSA can be enrolled, whether they had an "initial PSA response to abiraterone" or never responded to abiraterone. Two expansion cohorts will be opened. One expansion cohort will evaluate patients who did achieve an "initial PSA response to abiraterone" within the first 6 months of treatment as defined above, but subsequently progressed by PSA with or without radiographic progression. A second expansion cohort will evaluate patients who did not achieve an "initial PSA response to abiraterone" as defined above but have PSA progression with or without radiographic progression. The rationale of the study is to determine if the better bioavailability of DST-2970 will overcome resistance to abiraterone acetate experienced in these two clinical settings. In all cohorts, treatment will continue until progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity, investigator and / or sponsor decision, intercurrent illness or patient withdrawal of consent. Patients will be monitored regularly with physical examination and laboratory tests.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Advanced ChemoHormonal Therapy for Treatment Naive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well the combination of apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone after chemotherapy work in treating patients that have received no prior treatment (treatment naive) for high risk prostate cancer that is sensitive to androgen deprivation therapy (castration sensitive) and has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). This study also aims to understand the inheritance of prostate cancer. If a gene or genes that cause prostate cancer can be found, the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer may be improved. Testosterone (a male hormone) can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using apalutamide may fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells. Antihormone therapy, such as abiraterone acetate, may lessen the amount of testosterone made by the body. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone after chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with castration sensitive prostate cancer.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Venetoclax, SL-401, and Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax, SL-401, and chemotherapy works in treating patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. SL-401 is a recombinant protein consisting of IL-3 linked to a toxic agent called DT. IL-3 attaches to IL-3 receptors on tumor cells in a targeted way and delivers DT to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax and SL-401 with chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Fluciclovine (FACBC) PET / CT Site-Directed Therapy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer, Flu-BLAST-PC Study

    This phase II trial studies how well fluciclovine positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) site-directed therapy works for treating patients with prostate cancer. Fluciclovine PET / CT may detect prostate cancer early and may help to show whether patients benefit from site directed treatment to PET detected abnormalities.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • A Study of Nivolumab or Placebo in Combination With Docetaxel in Men With Advanced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to test the safety and effectiveness of nivolumab with docetaxel in men with advanced castration resistant prostate cancer who have progressed after second-generation hormonal manipulation.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Isatuximab, Bendamustine, and Prednisone for the Treatment of Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine and how well it works when given together with isatuximab and prednisone for the treatment of multiple myeloma that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with isatuximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving isatuximab, bendamustine, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Dose-Escalation and Efficacy Study of LAE001 / Prednisone Plus Afuresertib Patients With m-CRPC

    The combination treatment of protein kinase B (AKT) inhibitor, afuresertib, with androgen synthesis enzyme inhibitor, LAE001, may provide an effective treatment for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (m-CRPC) patients who have progressed / drug resistant following prior standard care treatments of any anti-androgen. This study intends to identify the most appropriate combined doses of LAE001 / prednisone and afuresertib in m-CRPC patients who have progressive disease or are intolerant of 2 prior standard treatments of any anti-androgen or anti-androgen treatment plus chemotherapy.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Acalabrutinib With DA-EPOCH-R or R-CHOP for People With Untreated Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    Background: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Most people with this cancer can be cured. But those who are not cured have a poor prognosis. Researchers want to add another drug to standard treatment see if it can improve the cure rate. Objective: To see if the drug acalabrutinib given with rituximab and standard combination chemotherapy can improve the cure rate of aggressive B-cell lymphomas such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with an aggressive B-cell lymphomas that have not been treated Design: Participants will be screened with: Blood and urine tests Physical exam Medical history Tumor biopsy Bone marrow biopsy: A needle will remove marrow from the participant s hipbone. Lumbar puncture: If necessary, a needle will remove fluid from the participant s spinal canal. Imaging scans Participants will take the study drug for up to 14 days. It is a pill taken 2 times a day. Then they will have more scans. They will get rituximab and chemotherapy. They may get these drugs through a needle in an arm vein. Or they may them through a tube placed in a vein in their chest or in their neck. They might also keep taking the study drug. Each treatment cycle lasts 21 days. They will have up to 6 cycles. Participants may have 4 doses of another drug injected into their spinal fluid. Participants will have repeats of the screening tests throughout the study. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment, then every 3 months for 2 years, then every 6 months for 3 years, and then yearly. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab and Combination Chemotherapy (R-CHOP) for the Treatment of Non-germinal Center Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma or High-Grade B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and combination chemotherapy (R-CHOP) work in treating patients with non-germinal center diffuse large B cell lymphoma or high-grade B cell lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with non-germinal center diffuse large B cell lymphoma or high-grade B cell lymphoma compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells than with chemotherapy alone in treating patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin with Standard Chemotherapy Regimen for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given with 3 and 4 drug standard chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as daunorubicin, vincristine, cytarabine, methotrexate, and pegaspargase, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to inotuzumab ozogamicin alone.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Carboplatin, Cabazitaxel and Abiraterone in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin, cabazitaxel and abiraterone work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other areas of the body (metastatic), but is still responding to hormone therapy (castration sensitive). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and cabazitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Abiraterone may block tissues from making androgens (male hormones), which may cause the death of tumor cells that need androgens to grow. Giving carboplatin, cabazitaxel and abiraterone may improve cancer control.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Abiraterone Acetate, Prednisone, and Apalutamide in Treating Patients with Hormone-Naive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well abiraterone acetate, prednisone, and apalutamide work in treating patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as abiraterone acetate and apalutamide may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B- or T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax and how well it works in combination with low-intensity chemotherapy in patients with B- or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has not responded to treatment or that has come back. Venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, including vincristine, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, rituximab, methotrexate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax with low-intensity chemotherapy may work better in treating patient with B- or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nivolumab with DA-REPOCH Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Aggressive B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works with the DA-REPOCH chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dose-adjusted rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DA-REPOCH), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab with DA-REPOCH may work better in treating patients with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Combination Chemotherapy and TAK-659 as Front-Line Treatment in Treating Patients with High-Risk Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate a new investigational drug, TAK-659, given in combination with standard chemotherapy, for the treatment of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). “Investigational” means that TAK-659 has not been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a prescription or over-the-counter medication to treat a certain condition. The primary purpose of this study is to find the appropriate and safe dose of the study drug to be used in combination with standard chemotherapy for the treatment of your disease and to determine how well the drug works in treating your disease. Other objectives include measuring the amount of the study drug in your body at different times after taking the study drug. Your participation in the study is expected to last for up to 3 years after receiving the last dose of the study drug. You will receive the study treatment for up to 18 weeks, as long as you are benefitting.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Disorders of T-cell Proliferation and / or Dysregulation

    Background: Blood stem cells in the bone marrow make all the cells to normally defend a body against disease. Allogeneic blood or marrow transplant is when these stem cells are transferred from one person to another. Researchers think this treatment can provide a new, healthy immune system to correct T-cell problems in some people. Objective: To see if allogeneic blood or bone marrow transplant is safe and effective in treating people with T-cell problems. Eligibility: Donors: Healthy people ages 4 and older Recipients: People the same age with abnormal T-cell function causing health problems Design: All participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, heart, and urine tests Donors will also have an electrocardiogram and chest x-ray. They may have veins tested or a pre-anesthesia test. Recipients will also have lung tests. Some participants will have scans and / or bone marrow collected by needle in the hip bones. Donors will learn about medicines and activities to avoid and repeat some screening tests. Some donors will stay in the hospital overnight and have bone marrow collected with anesthesia. Other donors will get shots for several days to stimulate cells. They will have blood removed by plastic tube (IV) in an arm vein. A machine will remove stem cells and return the rest of the blood to the other arm. Recipients will have: - More bone marrow and a small fragment of bone removed - Dental, diet, and social worker consultations - Scans - Chemotherapy and antibody therapy for 2 weeks - Catheter inserted in a chest or neck vein to receive donor stem cells - A hospital stay for several weeks with more medicines and procedures - Multiple follow-up visits...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Antiandrogen Therapy, Abiraterone Acetate, and Prednisone with or without Neutron Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well antiandrogen therapy, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone with or without neutron radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer. Hormone therapy such as antiandrogen therapy may fight prostate cancer by blocking the production and interfering with the action of hormones. Abiraterone acetate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Neutron radiation therapy uses high energy neutrons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether antiandrogen therapy, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone with or without neutron radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Abiraterone and Prednisone without Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well abiraterone acetate and prednisone work without hormone therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Abiraterone acetate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Prednisone is used to lessen inflammation and lower the body's immune response. When abiraterone acetate and prednisone are used, hormone injections are usually continued to maintain a low testosterone level in the blood. This study is being done to find out whether giving abiraterone acetate and prednisone without hormone injections would maintain lower levels of testosterone in the blood in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • GnRH analog, Abiraterone Acetate, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Stage IV Castration Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies how GnRH analog, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone work in treating patients with stage IV castration sensitive prostate cancer. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as GnRH analog, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Tailored Prednisone Reduction in Preventing Hyperglycemia in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Receiving Combination Chemotherapy Treatment

    This phase II trial studies how well tailored prednisone reduction works in preventing high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving combination chemotherapy treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Reductions in prednisone dose may lower blood sugar levels.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • A Study of Glofitamab in Combination With Rituximab or Obinutuzumab Plus Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, and Prednisone (CHOP) in Participants With Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas and Participants With DLBCL

    This is a phase 1B, multi-center, dose-finding study of glofitamab administered in combination with obinutuzumab (Gazyva; [G]), rituximab (R) and standard doses of CHOP (G / R-CHOP or R-CHOP) in participants with r / r NHL and untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Evaluating the safety, preliminary activity, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic effects of this combination will be the main objectives of this study. The study is divided in two parts: - Part I: Dose finding in participants with r / r NHL; test use of G vs R in Cycle 1 - Part II: Dose Expansion. The maximum tolerated dose or optimal biological dose (MTD or OBD) will be further assessed in participants with r / r NHL and those with untreated DLBCL (>60 years of age with an age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (IPI) of 2-3). Particularly, the impact of using glofitamab plus G / R-CHOP (i.e., add-on arm) versus glofitamab plus CHOP (i.e., replacement arm) will be assessed in untreated DLBCL participants.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Roflumilast and Standard Chemoimmunotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV High-Risk Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects of roflumilast and standard chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP: cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, rituximab, prednisone) in treating patients with stage II-IV high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Roflumilast may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as R-CHOP, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving roflumilast and standard chemoimmunotherapy may work better in treating patients with stage II-IV high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Apalutamide, Abiraterone Acetate, and Prednisone in Treating Participants with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well apalutamide and abiraterone acetate work in treating participants with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Abiraterone acetate and apalutamide may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as prednisone, is used to decrease the body’s immune response and may improve bone marrow function. Giving apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone may work better in treating participants with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas