Clinical Trials Using Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-11 of 11
  • Chemokine Modulation Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well chemokine modulation therapy works when given prior to pembrolizumab in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemokine modulation therapy, such as celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod, work by unleashing or enhancing the cancer immune responses that already exist by either blocking inhibitory molecules or by activating stimulatory molecules. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemokine modulation therapy before pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Celecoxib, Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b, and Rintatolimod in Treating Patients with Colorectal Cancer Metastatic to the Liver

    This early phase IIA trial studies how well celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that as spread to the liver. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Recombinant interferon alfa-2b is a substance that can improve the body’s natural response and may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Rintatolimod may stimulate the immune system. Giving celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Chemoimmunotherapy and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    This partially randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of recombinant interferon alfa-2b when given together with cisplatin, rintatolimod, and celecoxib and to see how well they work with vaccine therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer that has come back (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Biological therapies, such as recombinant interferon alpha-2b, rintatolimod, and celecoxib, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Vaccines made from a persons white blood cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Infusing the vaccine directly into a lymph node may cause a stronger immune response and kill more tumor cells. Giving cisplatin, recombinant interferon alpha-2b, rintatolimod, celecoxib, and vaccine therapy may be a better treatment for ovarian cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b before and after surgery in Treating Patients with Locally / Regionally Advanced or Recurrent Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pembrolizumab and high-dose recombinant interferon alfa-2b before and after surgery in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to nearby lymph nodes or organs and tissues (locally / regionally) or has returned after a period of improvement (recurrent). Pembrolizumab may block a substance found on the surface of tumor cells called programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and may help the immune system to kill the cells. Recombinant interferon alfa-2b interferes with the survival of tumor cells and may slow tumor growth. Giving pembrolizumab and recombinant interferon alfa-2b together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Treatment and Natural History Study of Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    This study will evaluate the response and long-term effects of alpha-interferon in patients with lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG). The disease causes proliferation of destructive cells involving the lungs, skin, kidneys, and central nervous system. Patients ages 12 and older who have LYG and who are not pregnant or breast feeding may be eligible for this study. Alpha interferon or chemotherapy, or both, will be used. Alpha interferon is a protein the body naturally produces. If patients have grade 3 disease, they will usually receive EPOCH-rituximab (EPOCH-R) chemotherapy (each letter representing a drug). If patients have grade 1 or 2 disease, the will usually receive alpha interferon. If patients have LYG after receiving alpha interferon and / or EPOCH-R, they may receive rituximab alone or with alpha interferon. Rituximab is an antibody, binding to a specific molecule (CD20) present on most B-cell lymphomas. Doses of several drugs in EPOCH-R may be increased if patients tolerated them in the previous cycle. If patients respond to EPOCH-R but still have low grade LYG, they may receive alpha interferon. Researchers will also try to obtain a biopsy of patients lesions, to help in understanding the disease. Patients self-administer alpha interferon by injection under the skin three times weekly. They will visit the clinic every 2 to 12 weeks for follow-up. Patients will receive alpha interferon for 1 year after LYG goes away, depending on response. EPOCH-R has these drugs: rituximab by vein on Day 1; prednisone by mouth on Days 1 to 5; etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine as a continuous intravenous infusion on Days 1 to 5; and cyclophosphamide by intravenous injection over 1 hour on Day 5. Each cycle lasts 3 weeks: 5 days of chemotherapy and 16 days of no chemotherapy. Etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine are infused through a small pump worn by patients. The drugs are given over 5 days through a central intravenous catheter. There are two cycles of EPOCH-R beyond a maximum response, with six cycles minimum. To reduce harm to bone marrow, patients receive granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), self-administered by injection under the skin daily for approximately 10 days between chemotherapy cycles. If at the end of therapy, patients have a complete response, treatment will stop. If there is residual low grade disease, patients may receive alpha interferon. Alpha interferon can have flu-like side effects of headache, fever, chills, and body aches. EPOCH-R drugs can cause gastrointestinal problems, hair loss, and weakness. G-CSF can cause bone pain, body aches, and hair thinning. Chemotherapy can cause some patients to develop leukemia. This study may or may not have a direct benefit for participants. It is not certain whether the new therapy will help decrease tumors. However, knowledge gained may improve the understanding of and treatment for LYG.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Combination Study of SV-BR-1-GM in Combination With INCMGA00012 and Epacadostat

    This is an open-label study of Study WRI-GEV-007, which evaluates SV-BR-1-GM in metastatic or locally recurrent breast cancer patients, in combination with the PD-1 inhibitor INCMGA00012 and the IDO inhibitor epacadostat. Patients who with advanced breast cancer who have failed prior therapies will be eligible to enroll in this study. The study will evaluate SV-BR-1-GM in combination with INCMGA00012 and epacadostat. Treatment cycles will be every 3 weeks with evaluations for tumor progression or response every 6-12 weeks.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Polarized Dendritic Cell (aDC1) Vaccine, Interferon Alpha-2, Rintalolimid, and Celecoxib for the Treatment of HLA-A2+ Refractory Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well polarized dendritic cell (aDC1) vaccine, interferon alpha-2, rintatolimod, and celecoxib work together in treating patients with HLA-A2 positive (+) melanoma that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). The aDC1 vaccine contains white blood cells (dendritic cells or DCs) that stimulates the immune system. Interferon alpha-2 can improve the body’s natural response to infections and other diseases. It can also interfere with the division of cancer cells and slow tumor growth. Rintalolimid may stimulate the immune system. Celecoxib is a drug that reduces pain. This study is being done to find out if aDC1 vaccine, interferon alpha-2, rintatolimod, and celecoxib can prevent the growth and / or progression of melanoma.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Chemokine Modulation Therapy and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery for the Treatment of Early Stage Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of chemokine modulation therapy when given together with standard chemotherapy given before surgery in treating patients with early stage triple negative breast cancer. Chemokines are molecules that are involved in a variety of immune and inflammatory responses. Chemokine modulation therapy, including celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod, may modify the immune response and tumor-related processes and may stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemokine modulation therapy together with standard chemotherapy may work better than giving either therapy alone in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Aspirin and Rintatolimod with or without Interferon-alpha 2b in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer Before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well aspirin and rintatolimod with or without interferon-alpha 2b work in treating patients with prostate cancer before surgery. Aspirin may help to keep the prostate cancer from coming back. Rintatolimod may stimulate the immune system and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Interferon-alpha 2b may improve the body’s natural response to infections and may slow tumor growth. It is not yet known how well rintatolimod, aspirin, and interferon-alpha 2b work in treating patients with prostate cancer undergoing surgery.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Type-1-polarized Dendritic Cell Vaccine, Interferon Alpha-2b, Rintatolimod, and Celecoxib in Treating Patients with Chemo-refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well type-1-polarized dendritic cell vaccine, interferon alpha-2b, rintatolimod, and celecoxib work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that does not respond to chemotherapy and has spread to other places in the body. Vaccines, such as type-1-polarized dendritic cell vaccine may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Interferon alpha-2b may improve the body’s natural response to infections and other diseases and interfere with the division of tumor cells and slow tumor growth. Rintatolimod may stimulate the immune system. Celecoxib may reduce pain and swelling. Giving alpha type-1-polarized dendritic cell vaccine, interferon alpha-2b, rintatolimod, and celecoxib may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer that does not respond to chemotherapy and has spread to other places in the body.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Precise Local Injection of Anti-cancer Drugs Using Presage's CIVO™ Device in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This is a feasibility study in patients with localized or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma undergoing surgery to determine how sarcoma in situ responds to injected microdoses of anti-cancer therapeutics.
    Location: 2 locations