Clinical Trials Using Sargramostim

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Sargramostim. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-24 of 24
  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: 128 locations

  • Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Temozolomide, and Dinutuximab with or without Eflornithine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride (irinotecan), temozolomide, and dinutuximab work with or without eflornithine in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or that isn't responding to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Eflornithine blocks the production of chemicals called polyamines that are important in the growth of cancer cells. Giving eflornithine with irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab, may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.
    Location: 96 locations

  • Dinutuximab, Sargramostim, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well dinutuximab and sargramostim work with combination chemotherapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sargramostim helps the body produce normal infection-fighting white blood cells. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant, with drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, melphalan, etoposide, carboplatin, topotecan, and isotretinoin, helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in a patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells). Giving dinutuximab and sargramostim with combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Multi-epitope Folate Receptor Alpha Peptide Vaccine, GM-CSF, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well multi-epitope folate receptor alpha peptide vaccine, sargramostim (GM-CSF), and cyclophosphamide work to prevent the recurrence of stage 1-3 triple negative breast cancer. Vaccines made from a person's white blood cells mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving multi-epitope folate receptor alpha peptide vaccine, sargramostim (GM-CSF), and cyclophosphamide may work well together to prevent cancer recurrence after surgery and other standard treatments for triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 11 locations

  • A Vaccine (Galinpepimut-S) with Nivolumab for the Treatment of Patients with WT1-Expressing Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of a vaccine, galinpepimut-S, and nivolumab in treating patients with WT1 positive malignant pleural mesothelioma. Vaccines, such as galinpepimut-S, are made from Wilms Tumor Protein 1 (WT1) peptide and may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express WT1. Galinpepimut-S is mixed with a substance called montanide, which helps to boost the immune reaction to galinpepimut-S. The mixture of the galinpepimut-S and montanide make up the actual final vaccine that is then given to patients. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may remove signals that block the immune system’s activity, indirectly strengthening the immune system to help fight the cancer. It has been shown that cancer vaccines can sometimes increase these signals that actually block the immune system’s anti-cancer activity. Using a cancer vaccine (galinpepimut-S) directed to mesothelioma cells with a drug that can unblock these negative signals (nivolumab) may help treat malignant pleural mesothelioma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia following Chemotherapy-Induced Remission

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia following chemotherapy-induced remission. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express acute myeloid antigen.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Naxitamab for High-Risk Neuroblastoma Patients With Primary Refractory Disease or Incomplete Response to Salvage Treatment in Bone and / or Bone Marrow

    Children and adults diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma patients with primary refractory disease or incomplete response to salvage treatment in bone and / or bone marrow will be treated for up to 101 weeks with naxitamab and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Patients will be followed for up to five years after first dose. Naxitamab, also known as hu3F8 is a humanised monoclonal antibody targeting GD2
    Location: 4 locations

  • OKT3 / Humanized 3F8 Bispecific Antibody-Activated T Lymphocytes, Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Younger Patients with GD2-Positive Metastatic, Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of OKT3 / humanized 3F8 bispecific antibody-activated T lymphocytes with given together with aldesleukin and sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with disialoganglioside GD2 (GD2)-positive solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), have come back (recurrent), or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Biological therapies, such as OKT3 / humanized 3F8 bispecific antibody-activated T lymphocytes, use substances made from living organisms that may attack specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Aldesleukin and sargramostim may stimulate white blood cells to kill tumor cells. Giving white blood cells that have been activated by OKT3 / humanized 3F8 bispecific antibody-activated T lymphocytes with aldesleukin and sargramostim may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • SVN53-67 / M57-KLH Peptide Vaccine in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Receiving Lenalidomide Maintenance Therapy

    This phase I trial studies the safety of SVN53-67 / M57-KLH peptide vaccine in incomplete Freund's adjuvant together with sargramostim in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who are receiving lenalidomide maintenance therapy. Vaccines made from survivin peptide may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells that express survivin. Incomplete Freund's adjuvant may help stimulate the body's immune response to a vaccine treatment. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of blood cells. Lenalidomide may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving SVN53-67 / M57-KLH peptide vaccine in incomplete Freund's adjuvant and sargramostim before or after the start of lenalidomide maintenance therapy may be a better treatment for multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • TPIV100 and Sargramostim for the Treatment of HER2 Positive, Stage II-III Breast Cancer in Patients with Residual Disease after Chemotherapy and Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well TPIV100 and sargramostim work in treating patients with HER2 positive, stage II-III breast cancer that has remained after chemotherapy and surgery. It also studies why some HER2 positive breast cancer patients respond better to chemotherapy in combination with trastuzumab and pertuzumab. TPIV100 is a type of vaccine made from HER2 peptide that may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Sargramostim increases the number of white blood cells in the body following chemotherapy for certain types of cancer and is used to alert the immune system. It is not yet known if TPIV100 and sargramostim will work better in treating patients with HER2 positive, stage II-III breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Vaccine Therapy (pTVG-HP DNA Vaccine with or without pTVG-AR DNA Vaccine) and Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy (pTVG-HP DNA vaccine with or without pTVG-AR DNA vaccine) and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). The pTVG-HP DNA vaccine and pTVG-AR DNA vaccine are made of DNA (genetic material) that contains genetic code for proteins that are made by the prostate gland. These “DNA vaccines” may strengthen the immune system to fight cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The main purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of pTVG-HP and pTVG-AR DNA vaccines in combination with pembrolizumab in slowing or stopping the growth of prostate cancer after it has stopped responding to testosterone-lowering therapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Vaccine (pp65 Loaded DC Vaccine) for the Treatment of Newly-Diagnosed Grade IV Unmethylated Glioma, I-ATTAC Study

    This phase II trial studies how well a vaccine (pp65 loaded DC vaccination) works for the treatment of newly-diagnosed grade IV unmethylated glioma. CMV pp65 DC vaccine may help to activate the immune system and help the body fight off the tumor cells in the brain.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • A Vaccine (SurVaxM) in Treating Patients with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of survivin long peptide vaccine (SurVaxM) and how it works with the immune system in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Neuroendocrine tumors form from cells that release hormones into the blood in response to a signal from the nervous system. Tumor cells make proteins that are not usually produced by normal cells. The body sees these proteins as not belonging to itself and sends immune cells called T cells to attack the tumor cells that contain these proteins. By vaccinating with small pieces of these proteins called peptides, the immune system can be made to kill tumor cells. Giving survivin long peptide vaccine to patients who have survivin expression in their tumors may create an immune response in the blood that is directed against neuroendocrine tumors.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • pTVG-HP and Nivolumab in Treating Participants with High-Risk PSA-Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pTVG-HP plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine (pTVG-HP) and nivolumab work in treating participants with high-risk prostate cancer with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that has come back. Vaccines made from DNA, such as pTVG-HP plasmid DNA vaccine, may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving pTVG-HP and nivolumab may work better in treating participants with prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Naxitamab, Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Temozolomide, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of naxitamab, irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and sargramostim in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Immunotherapy with naxitamab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and sargramostim, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving naxitamab, irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and sargramostim may work better in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Humanized Monoclonal Antibody 3F8, Sargramostim, and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma in First Remission

    This phase II trial studies how well humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, sargramostim, and isotretinoin work in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma in first remission. Monoclonal antibodies, such as humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as sargramostim, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as isotretinoin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, sargramostim, and isotretinoin may work better in treating patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Sargramostim and Trastuzumab in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent Ependymoma

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of trastuzumab when given together with sargramostim in treating younger patients with ependymoma that have returned after a period of improvement. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving trastuzumab with sargramostim may work better in treating younger patients with recurrent ependymoma.
    Location: Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

  • Abbreviated Mycophenolate Mofetil and Sargramostim after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High Risk or Recurrent Hematological Malignancies

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well a shortened course of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil after stem cell transplant works when given with sargramostim in treating patients with a cancer that affects the blood or bone marrow (hematological malignancy), and is at high risk for returning or came back after previous treatment (recurrent). Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a condition that may occur after transplant, in which the stem cells that are transplanted from a donor (the "graft") attack the normal cells of the patient (the “host”). Mycophenolate mofetil is used to help prevent GVHD after transplants. Giving mycophenolate mofetil for a shorter period of time may help the transplanted cells engraft with the patient's body more quickly, which may help the patient recover after the transplant. After transplants, colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, are also given to help keep the bone marrow working to fight infections until it can recover from the transplant. Sargramostim may be a more effective treatment for supporting the bone marrow function than standard treatment with filgrastim. It is not yet known whether giving abbreviated treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and sargramostim is more effective than longer treatment given with filgrastim in treating patients with high risk or recurrent hematological malignancies after transplant.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Humanized Monoclonal Antibody 3F8 and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Recurrent Osteosarcoma

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 (Hu3F8) and sargramostim work in treating patients with bone cancer (osteosarcoma) that has come back (recurrent). Monoclonal antibodies, such as humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, may stimulate the immune system and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the number of granulocytes (kinds of white blood cells that are able to kill cancer cells). Sargramostim increases the number of other kinds of white blood cells that may help attack tumor cells. Sargramostim may also make humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 more effective against osteosarcoma. Giving humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 together with sargramostim may be an effective treatment for patients with osteosarcoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • ERC1671 / GM-CSF / Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Relapsed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy, sargramostim, cyclophosphamide, and bevacizumab compared with placebo works in treating patients with glioblastoma multiforme that has returned after a period of improvement. Vaccines made from gene-modified tumor cells may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help increase immune response from tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing and spreading. Bevacizumab may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor and by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving vaccine therapy, sargramostim, and cyclophosphamide together with bevacizumab may be an effective treatment for patients with recurrent or progressive glioblastoma multiforme.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • Naxitamab and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of naxitamab and how well it works when given together with sargramostim in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (recurrent). Immunotherapy with naxitamab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving naxitamab together with sargramostim may be an effective treatment for patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Azacitidine and Sargramostim as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients with Poor-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome That Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant or Received Cytarabine-Based Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well azacitidine and sargramostim work as maintenance therapy in treating patients with poor-risk acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that have undergone stem cell transplant or received cytarabine-based chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving azacitidine and sargramostim may be effective in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Giving chemotherapy and colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF), helps stem cells move from the patient’s bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab with or without Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies the side effects of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with or without sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of white blood cells. It is not yet known whether nivolumab and ipilimumab are more effective with or without sargramostim in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: 386 locations