Clinical Trials Using Sunitinib Malate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Sunitinib Malate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-14 of 14
  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1192 locations

  • Cabozantinib S-Malate, Crizotinib, Savolitinib, or Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib s-malate, crizotinib, savolitinib, or sunitinib malate work in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or to other places in the body. Cabozantinib s-malate, crizotinib, savolitinib, and sunitinib malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving cabozantinib s-malate, crizotinib, or savolitinib will work better in treating patients with kidney cancer compared to sunitinib malate.
    Location: 515 locations

  • A Study of DCC-2618 vs Sunitinib in Advanced GIST Patients After Treatment With Imatinib

    This is a 2-arm, randomized, open-label, international, multicenter study comparing the efficacy of DCC-2618 to sunitinib in GIST patients who progressed on or were intolerant to first-line anticancer treatment with imatinib. Approximately 358 patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to DCC-2618 150 mg once daily (QD) (continuous dosing for 6 week cycles) or sunitinib 50 mg QD (6 week cycles, 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off).
    Location: 17 locations

  • Lenvatinib / Everolimus or Lenvatinib / Pembrolizumab Versus Sunitinib Alone as Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    This is a multicenter, randomized, open-label, Phase 3 study to compare the efficacy and safety of lenvatinib in combination with everolimus (Arm A) or pembrolizumab (Arm B) versus sunitinib (Arm C) as first-line treatment in participants with advanced renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: 8 locations

  • TAPUR: Testing the Use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approved Drugs That Target a Specific Abnormality in a Tumor Gene in People With Advanced Stage Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to learn from the real world practice of prescribing targeted therapies to patients with advanced cancer whose tumor harbors a genomic variant known to be a drug target or to predict sensitivity to a drug. NOTE: Due to character limits, the arms section does NOT include all TAPUR Study relevant biomarkers. For additional information, contact TAPUR@asco.org, or if a patient, your nearest participating TAPUR site (see participating centers).
    Location: 8 locations

  • Sunitinib Malate or Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well sunitinib malate or cediranib maleate works in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Sunitinib malate and cediranib maleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor and by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether sunitinib malate or cediranib maleate is more effective in treating soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Phase 1 Study To Evaluate Escalating Doses Of A Vaccine-Based Immunotherapy Regimen For Prostate Cancer (PrCa VBIR)

    The study will evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of increasing doses of a vaccine-based immunotherapy regimen for patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Cabozantinib or Sunitinib Malate in Treating Participants with Metastatic Variant Histology Renal Cell Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies of side effects of cabozantinib and sunitinib malate and to see how well they work in treating participants with variant histology kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Cabozantinib and sunitinib malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Sunitinib in Sarcomas of the Central Nervous System

    Background: A sarcoma is a rare cancer. It grows in the body s connective tissue. Sarcomas in the brain and central nervous system are especially rare. The drug Sunitinib has been approved in many countries for treating other types of rare or advanced cancers. These include kidney, pancreas, and bowel cancer. Researchers want to see if it can help people with sarcomas of the central nervous system. Objective: To study the effects of Sunitinib on gliosarcomas or sarcomas of the central nervous system. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with a gliosarcoma or sarcoma of the central nervous system Design: Participants will be screened with the following tests. Some may be done as part of their regular cancer care: Medical history Medication review Physical exam Blood, heart, and pregnancy tests Cranial scans to locate and measure their tumor Participants will take Sunitinib by mouth every day for 2 weeks and then take none of the drug for 1 week. These 3 weeks equal 1 cycle. Participants will have 2 study visits in cycle 1. They will have 1 visit in all other cycles. They will answer questions about quality of life and repeat some screening tests. Participants will take their blood pressure at home weekly. They keep a diary of each dose of Sunitinib and blood pressure reading. Participants can choose to share data about their physical activity levels and quality of sleep. These participants will wear a small, portable watch-sized accelerometer device on the wrist for 6 cycles. About 1 month after their last study drug dose, participants will have a final study visit. They will have a physical exam, blood tests, and scans.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab and Sunitinib Malate in Treating Participants with Refractory Metastatic or Unresectable Thymic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and sunitinib malate work in treating participants with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery and does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sunitinib malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and sunitinib malate may work better in treating thymic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Alternative Schedule Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Kidney Cancer or That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized pilot phase II trial studies how well alternative schedule sunitinib malate works in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other parts of the body or that cannot be removed by surgery. Giving sunitinib malate with different schedules may influence aerobic capacity, which is a predictor of quality of life. Evaluating changes in cardiopulmonary function, or fitness level, in subjects treated with two different schedules of sunitinib malate may help doctors find better treatment strategies for kidney cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Personalized Kinase Inhibitor Therapy Combined with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase IB trial studies the feasibility of using a functional laboratory based study to determine how well the test can be used to select personalized kinase inhibitor therapy in combination with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It also evaluates safety and potential efficacy. Kinase inhibitor is a type of substance that blocks an enzyme called a kinase. Human cells have many different kinase enzymes, and they help control important cell functions. Certain kinases are more active in some types of cancer cells and blocking them may help keep the cancer cells from growing. Testing samples of blood from patients with AML and ALL in the laboratory with kinase inhibitors may help determine which kinase inhibitor has more activity against cancer cells and which one should be combined with standard of care chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a personalized kinase inhibitor therapy combined with standard chemotherapy may be a better treatment for AML and ALL.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Sunitinib Malate or Valproic Acid in Preventing Metastasis in Patients With High-Risk Uveal Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well sunitinib malate or valproic acid works in preventing high-risk uveal (eye) melanoma from spreading to other parts of the body. Sunitinib malate may stop the transmission of growth signals into tumor cells and prevents these cells from growing. Valproic acid may change the expression of some genes in uveal melanoma and suppress tumor growth.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania