Clinical Trials Using Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study of Experimental Medication BMS-986178 by Itself or in Combination With Nivolumab and / or Ipilimumab in Patients With Solid Cancers That Are Advanced or Have Spread

    The purpose of the study is to determine the safety and tumor-shrinking ability of experimental medication BMS-986178, when given by itself or in combination with Nivolumab and / or Ipilimumab, in participants with solid cancers that are advanced or have spread.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy and Poly-ICLC in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent Low-Grade Gliomas that Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC) work in treating younger patients with low-grade gliomas that have come back after treatment and cannot be removed by surgery. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells. Giving booster vaccinations may make a stronger immune response and prevent or delay the recurrence of cancer. Giving HLA-A2-restricted synthetic glioma antigen peptides vaccine and tetanus toxoid vaccine with poly-ICLC may work better in treating younger patients with recurrent low-grade gliomas that cannot be removed by surgery.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Vaccine Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients with Recurrent Glioma Expressing IDH1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of vaccine therapy and temozolomide in treating patients with glioma expressing isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene that has returned (come back) after a period of improvement (recurrent). Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express IDH1. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving vaccine therapy with temozolomide may be a better treatment for recurrent glioma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Depleted Immune Suppressor Stem Cell Transplant in Enhancing Immune Response to Vaccines in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This pilot, randomized phase II trial studies how well depleted immune suppressor stem cell transplant works compared to standard stem cell transplant in enhancing immune response to vaccines in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Chemotherapy and the patient's own stem cells are effective in treating MM, however there is a risk of disease returning due to poor recovery of the immune system as shown to poor response to vaccines to prevent infections. Before chemotherapy, patients' stem cells are collected and certain immune cells called suppressor cells are removed from the stem cells. Patients then receive chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and after that the immune depleted stem cells are returned to them to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy. Giving depleted immune suppressor stem cells transplant to patients with MM may result in a more robust immune response to vaccines after transplant and may prevent MM from returning. It is not yet known whether depleted immune suppressor stem cell transplant is more effective than standard stem cell transplant in enhancing immune response to vaccines in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska