Clinical Trials Using Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • CMV-DC Vaccine in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Glioblastoma, Recurrent Malignant Glioma, or Recurrent Medulloblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of CMV-DC vaccine and to see how well it works in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma or glioblastoma, malignant glioma, or medulloblastoma that has come back. A protein, or antigen, that is found in a common virus called cytomegalovirus (CMV), is expressed on some brain tumors. Dendritic cells (DCs) are a special type of immune system cell found in tissues of the body that boost immune responses. Vaccines made from the CMV antigen and a person's DCs may help the body build an effective immune response to kill brain tumor cells.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Vaccine Therapy and Poly-ICLC in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent Low-Grade Gliomas that Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC) work in treating younger patients with low-grade gliomas that have come back after treatment and cannot be removed by surgery. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells. Giving booster vaccinations may make a stronger immune response and prevent or delay the recurrence of cancer. Giving HLA-A2-restricted synthetic glioma antigen peptides vaccine and tetanus toxoid vaccine with poly-ICLC may work better in treating younger patients with recurrent low-grade gliomas that cannot be removed by surgery.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Vaccine Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients with Recurrent Glioma Expressing IDH1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of vaccine therapy and temozolomide in treating patients with glioma expressing isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene that has returned (come back) after a period of improvement (recurrent). Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express IDH1. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving vaccine therapy with temozolomide may be a better treatment for recurrent glioma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Quantitative, Qualitative, and Functional Studies over the First Year in Measuring Immune System Response During the First Year of Therapy in Patients with Brain Tumors

    This research trial studies quantitative, qualitative, and functional studies over the first year in measuring immune system response in patients with brain tumors. Measuring the number of immune cells, whether these immune cells work correctly, and response to 2 vaccines at several times during the first year of treatment may help find out how active the immune system responds to fight infection and cancer.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina