Clinical Trials Using Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocyte Therapy

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocyte Therapy. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-12 of 12
  • Study of LN-145, Autologous Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes in the Treatment of Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Prospective, multicenter, single-arm, open label, interventional study evaluating adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) infusion (LN-145) followed by IL-2 after a non-myeloablative (NMA) lymphodepletion preparative regimen for the treatment of patients with recurrent, metastatic, or persistent cervical carcinoma
    Location: 16 locations

  • Study of Autologous Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Patients With Solid Tumors

    A prospective, open-label, multi-cohort, non-randomized, multicenter Phase 2 study evaluating adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with TIL LN-144 (Lifileucel) / LN-145 in combination with checkpoint inhibitors or TIL LN-144 (Lifileucel) / LN-145 / LN-145-S1 as a single agent therapy.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Autologous LN-145 in Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    This is a prospective, open-label, multi-cohort, non-randomized, multicenter phase 2 study evaluating LN-145 in patients with metastatic NSCLC.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Modified Immune Cells (LN-145) for the Treatment of Pretreated Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well modified immune cells (LN-145) work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). LN-145 is made up of specialized white blood cells called lymphocytes or “T cells” that are derived from a patient's tumor after a small piece is obtained by surgical removal. This piece of the patient's tumor is sent to a centralized manufacturing facility where T cells that have infiltrated the tumor are isolated and grown to create LN-145, which is infused back into the body. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte therapy with LN-145 involves expanding and activating tumor-derived T cells in vitro (in tissue culture) and then infusing the cells back into the patient where they may then attack the tumor.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Autologous Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Interleukin 2 for the Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer or Stage III-IV Cutaneous or Mucosal Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the possible benefits and / or side effects of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose IL-2 in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or stage III-IV cutaneous or mucosal melanoma. Autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are special tumor-fighting cells that are taken from patients’ tumors, grown in the laboratory, and then given back to the patient to fight their cancer. High-dose IL-2 increases the activity and growth of white blood cells called T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. Giving autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose IL-2 may kill more cancer cells and help researchers learn more about the transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes to treat cancer.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Solid Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well cell therapy (with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) works for the treatment of solid cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), or has come back (recurrent). This trial involves taking cells called lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the therapy is called cell therapy. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, before treating with these cells may temporarily suppress the immune system to improve the chances that the tumor fighting cells will be able to survive in the body. Giving aldesleukin after the cell administration may help the tumor fighting cells stay alive longer. Giving tumor fighting cells (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) followed by aldesleukin may cause the cancer to shrink.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Autologous Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes MDA-TIL in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes MDA-TIL works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes MDA-TIL, made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) from a patient's tumor, may help to stimulate the immune system in different ways to stop tumor cells from growing.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine, Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and aldesleukin work in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes may be an effective treatment for uveal melanoma. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells to kill uveal melanoma cells. Giving cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and aldesleukin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • LN-145 or LN-145-S1 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) or LN-145-S1 works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, anaplastic thyroid cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. LN-145-S1 is made using a modified process that chooses a specific portion of the T-cells. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Modified T-Cells Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cells followed by aldesleukin in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. T-cells are a type of white blood cell that help the body fight infections. Genes that may help the T-cells recognize melanoma cells are placed into the T-cells in the laboratory. Adding these genes to the T cells may help them kill more tumor cells when they are put back in the body. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Modified Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III or Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies how well genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes (patient's own white blood cells) followed by aldesleukin work in treating patients with stage III melanoma or melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Placing chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) and nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) into lymphocytes (white blood cells) may help the body build an immune response to kill melanoma cells. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells. Giving genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes together with aldesleukin may be a better treatment for melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Aldesleukin with or without Autologous Dendritic Cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin with or without autologous dendritic cells work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other areas of the body. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells and special blood cells (dendritic cells) may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin are more effective when given together with or without dendritic cells in shrinking or slowing the growth of melanoma. The clinical benefits of receiving tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in combination with the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine / threonine kinase (BRAF) inhibitor will be studied, in patients who have progressive disease (PD) with using the BRAF inhibitor prior to TIL treatment. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) is unfortunately a common development in patients with melanoma, with an extremely poor prognosis, translating into an overall survival of only weeks. With the novel approach of combining intrathecal TILs and intrathecal interleukin (IL)-2, researchers hope to induce long term disease stabilization or remission of LMD.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas