Clinical Trials to Treat Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

Trials 1-13 of 13
  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with or without Ramucirumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Thymic Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab work in treating patients with thymic cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), has come back (recurrent), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known if giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab will work better in treating patients with thymic cancer.
    Location: 246 locations

  • A Study of XmAb®20717 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD / RD and regimen of XmAb20717, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb20717 in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Nivolumab and Vorolanib in Treating Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Refractory Thoracic Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorolanib when given in combination with nivolumab in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer and thoracic tumors that aren't responding to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vorolanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab and vorolanib may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer and thoracic tumors.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Study of SO-C101 and SO-C101in Combination With Pembro in Adult Patients With Advanced / Metastatic Solid Tumors

    A multicenter open-label phase 1 / 1b study to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of SO-C101 as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab in patients with selected advanced / metastatic solid tumors
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab and Sunitinib Malate in Treating Participants with Refractory Metastatic or Unresectable Thymic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and sunitinib malate work in treating participants with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery and does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sunitinib malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and sunitinib malate may work better in treating thymic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Unresectable Thymoma or Thymic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the sides effects and best dose of pembrolizumab in treating participants with thymoma or thymic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Selinexor in Treating Participants with Advanced Thymic Epithelial Tumor

    This phase II trial studies how well selinexor works in treating participants with thymic epithelial tumor that has spread to other places in the body. Selinexor may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the proteins needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Epacadostat in Treating Participants with Advanced Thymic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and epacadostat works in treating participants with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and epacadostat may work better in treating participants with advanced thymic cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Abexinostat and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with MSI-High Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of abexinostat and how well it works with given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with microsatellite instability (MSI) solid tumors that have spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic). Abexinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving abexinostat and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with solid tumors.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Oral TrkA Inhibitor VMD-928 for Treatment of Advanced Adult Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1 study of orally administered VMD-928 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma that have progressed or are non responsive to available therapies and for which no standard or available curative therapy exists
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • A Pilot Study to Investigate the Safety and Clinical Activity of Avelumab (MSB0010718C) in Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma After Progression on Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    Background: Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are cancers originating in the thymus gland. Platinum-based chemotherapy is standard treatment for them. But not uncommonly, the disease returns and people need more treatment to keep the cancer from growing. The drug Avelumab could help the immune system fight cancer. Objective: To test if avelumab is safe and well-tolerated, and is effective in treating relapsed or refractory thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with thymoma or thymic carcinoma that has returned or progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with: - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scan: They lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Physical exam - Medical history - Biopsy: a needle removes a piece of tumor. Samples can be from a previous procedure, although it is desirable to undergo a new biopsy. Participants will have treatment in 2-week cycles. They will continue until the side effects are not tolerable or their disease gets worse. Visits at the following time points are required per protocol. Patients who respond to treatment or have durable stability after at least 12 months of therapy may undergo a dose de-escalation regimen to continue on therapy. - Every 2 weeks: Participants will get avelumab by infusion in a vein (IV). They will get diphenhydramine (benadryl) and acetaminophen (tylenol) by mouth or IV before receiving avelumab to decrease the chances of developing a reaction to avelumab. They will have blood, urine, and heart tests periodically. - Cycles 4 and 7, then every 6 weeks: Scans will be performed to look for shrinkage or growth of tumor. - Cycle 4: Participants will be offered a chance to undergo a biopsy. - 2-4 weeks after stopping treatment: Blood, urine, and heart tests will be performed. Participants might undergo a scan. - 10 weeks after stopping treatment: Blood, urine, and heart tests. - About 6 months after stopping treatment, then every 3 months: Participants will have scans andcan allow genetic testing on their blood and tissue samples.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Rapid Analysis and Response Evaluation of Combination Anti-Neoplastic Agents in Rare Tumors (RARE CANCER) Trial: RARE 1 Nilotinib and Paclitaxel

    Background: People with rare cancers often have limited treatment options. The biology of rare cancers is not well understood. Researchers want to find better treatments for these cancers. They want to test 2 drugs that, taken separately, have helped people with non-rare cancers. They want to see if these drugs together can make rare cancers shrink or stop growing. Objective: To learn if nilotinib and paclitaxel will benefit people with rare cancers. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have a rare, advanced cancer that has progressed after receiving standard treatment, or for which no effective therapy exists. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have a pregnancy test if needed. They will have an electrocardiogram to check their heart. They will have imaging scans to measure their tumors. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. Participants will receive nilotinib and paclitaxel. The drugs are given in 28-day cycles. Nilotinib is a capsule taken by mouth twice a day. Paclitaxel will be given intravenously by peripheral line or central line once a week for the first 3 weeks of each cycle. Participants will keep a medicine diary. They will track when they take the study drugs and any side effects they may have. Participants may have optional tumor biopsies. Participants can stay on the study until their disease gets worse or they have intolerable side effects. Participants will have a follow-up phone call about 30 days after taking the last dose of study drugs.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Bintrafusp Alfa (M7824) in Subjects With Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    Background: Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are diseases of the thymus. Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for these diseases. But in many cases, the disease returns after treatment. Researchers want to see if a new drug can help. Objective: To see if bintrafusp alfa (M7824) is an effective treatment for thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have thymoma or thymic cancer and their disease returned or progressed after treatment with at least one platinum-containing chemotherapy treatment plan, or they have refused standard therapy Design: Participants will be screened under a separate protocol. Their medical, medicine, and treatment history will be reviewed. They will have a tumor biopsy if they do not have a sample. Participants will get the study drug once every 2 weeks as an intravenous infusion. For this, a small plastic tube is put into an arm vein. During the study, participants will undergo the following: Medicine review Physical exam Review of their symptoms and their ability to perform their normal activities Blood and urine tests Thigh muscle scan (using MRI) Tumor assessment (using MRI or CT) Heart and lung function tests Thyroid gland test Skin assessment. Participants may have tumor biopsies. Some of their blood and biopsy samples will be used for gene testing. Participants may take the study drug until their disease worsens or they cannot tolerate treatment. Participants will have follow-up visits 2 and 6 weeks after stopping treatment. Then they will have long-term follow-up visits every 3 months. These may include imaging scans. Visits may be done by phone, with scans (if needed) done at their doctor s office.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland