Clinical Trials to Treat Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

Trials 1-10 of 10
  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with or without Ramucirumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Thymic Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab work in treating patients with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body, has come back, or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known if giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab will work better in treating patients with thymic cancer.
    Location: 177 locations

  • Phase 1b Multi-indication Study of Anetumab Ravtansine in Mesothelin Expressing Advanced Solid Tumors

    The key purpose of the main part of the study is to assess efficacy and safety of anetumab ravtansine as monotherapy or combination therapy for mesothelin expressing advanced solid tumors. The main purpose of the safety lead-in (dose-finding) part of the study is to determine the safety and tolerability of anetumab ravtansine in combination with cisplatin and in combination with gemcitabine, and to determine the MTD of anetumab ravtansine in combination with cisplatin for mesothelin expressing advanced cholangiocarcinoma and in combination with gemcitabine for mesothelin expressing advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients will receive anetumab ravtansine every three weeks in monotherapy for most indications. In cholangiocarinoma and adenocarinoma of the pancreas, 3-weekly anetumab ravtansine is administered in combination with cisplatin or gemcitabine respectively (both administered in a 2 week on / 1 week off schedule). Treatment will continue until disease progression or until another criterion for withdrawal is met. .Efficacy will be measured by evaluating the tumor's objective response rate. Radiological tumor assessments will be performed at defined time points until the patient's disease progresses. Blood samples will be collected for safety, pharmacokinetic and biomarker analysis. Archival or fresh biopsy tissue will also be collected for mesothelin expression testing and biomarker analyses.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Nivolumab and Vorolanib in Treating Participants with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Refractory Thoracic Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best does of vorolanib when given in combination with nivolumab in treating participants with non-small cell lung cancer and thoracic tumors that aren't responding to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vorolanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab and vorolanib may work better in treating participants with non-small cell lung cancer and thoracic tumors.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Oral TrkA Inhibitor VMD-928 for Treatment of Advanced Adult Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1 study of orally administered VMD-928 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma that have progressed or are non responsive to available therapies and for which no standard or available curative therapy exists
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Pembrolizumab and Sunitinib Malate in Treating Participants with Refractory Metastatic or Unresectable Thymic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and sunitinib malate work in treating participants with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery and does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sunitinib malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and sunitinib malate may work better in treating thymic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Unresectable Thymoma or Thymic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the sides effects and best dose of pembrolizumab in treating participants with thymoma or thymic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Selinexor in Treating Participants with Advanced Thymic Epithelial Tumor

    This phase II trial studies how well selinexor works in treating participants with thymic epithelial tumor that has spread to other places in the body. Selinexor may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the proteins needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Pilot Study to Investigate the Safety and Clinical Activity of Avelumab (MSB0010718C) in Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma After Progression on Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    Background: Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are cancers originating in the thymus gland. Platinum-based chemotherapy is standard treatment for them. But not uncommonly, the disease returns and people need more treatment to keep the cancer from growing. The drug Avelumab could help the immune system fight cancer. Objective: To test if avelumab is safe and well-tolerated, and is effective in treating relapsed or refractory thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with thymoma or thymic carcinoma that has returned or progressed after platinum-containing chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with: - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scan: They lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Physical exam - Medical history - Biopsy: a needle removes a piece of tumor. Samples can be from a previous procedure, although it is desirable to undergo a new biopsy. Participants will have treatment in 2-week cycles. They will continue until the side effects are not tolerable or their disease gets worse. Visits at the following time points are required per protocol: - Every 2 weeks: Participants will get avelumab by infusion in a vein (IV). They will get diphenhydramine (benadryl) and acetaminophen (tylenol) by mouth or IV before receiving avelumab to decrease the chances of developing a reaction to avelumab. They will have blood, urine, and heart tests periodically. - Cycles 4 and 7, then every 6 weeks: Scans will be performed to look for shrinkage or growth of tumor. - Cycle 4: Participants will be offered a chance to undergo a biopsy. - 2-4 weeks after stopping treatment: Blood, urine, and heart tests will be performed. Participants might undergo a scan. - 10 weeks after stopping treatment: Blood, urine, and heart tests. - About 6 months after stopping treatment, then every 3 months: Participants will have scans andcan allow genetic testing on their blood and tissue samples.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab and Epacadostat in Treating Participants with Advanced Thymic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and epacadostat works in treating participants with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and epacadostat may work better in treating participants with advanced thymic cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Mithramycin for Lung, Esophagus, and Other Chest Cancers

    Background: - Mithramycin is a drug that was first tested as a cancer therapy in the 1960s. It acted against some forms of cancer, but was never accepted as a treatment. Research suggests that it may be useful against some cancers of the chest, such as lung and esophageal cancer or mesothelioma. Researchers want to see if mithramycin can be used to treat these types of cancer. Objectives: - To see if mithramycin is safe and effective against different chest cancers. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have lung, esophagus, pleura, or mediastinum cancers. Design: - Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Imaging studies and tumor tissue samples will be used to monitor the cancer before treatment. - Participants will receive mithramycin every day for 7 days, followed by 7 days without treatment. Each 14-day round of treatment is called a cycle. - Treatment will be monitored with frequent blood tests and imaging studies. - Participants will continue to take the drug for as long as the side effects are not severe and the tumor responds to treatment.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland