Cancer Moonshot℠

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The Cancer Moonshot to accelerate cancer research aims to make more therapies available to more patients, while also improving our ability to prevent cancer and detect it at an early stage.

To ensure that the Cancer Moonshot's goals and approaches are grounded in the best science, a Cancer Moonshot Task Force consulted with external experts, including the presidentially appointed National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB).

A Blue Ribbon Panel of experts was established as a working group of the NCAB to assist the board in providing this advice. The panel's charge was to provide expert advice on the vision, proposed scientific goals, and implementation of the Cancer Moonshot.

Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act in December 2016, authorizing $1.8 billion in funding for the Cancer Moonshot over 7 years. The funding must be appropriated each fiscal year over those 7 years. Congress appropriated $300 million to NCI for fiscal year (FY) 2017, $300 million for FY 2018, and $400 million for FY 2019.

Blue Ribbon Panel

A Blue Ribbon Panel of experts was established as a working group of the NCAB to ensure that the Cancer Moonshot's approaches are grounded in the best science. Their report outlines 10 recommendations to accelerate progress against cancer.

Cancer Moonshot℠ Implementation

Implementation teams are considering multiple ways to fund new programs as well as expansions of ongoing efforts to advance the goals of the Cancer Moonshot.

Funding Opportunities to Support Cancer Moonshot

New Cancer Moonshot funding opportunities from NCI support goals articulated in the recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Panel.

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