Treatment Clinical Trials for Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for extragonadal germ cell tumor treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-13 of 13
  • Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Carboplatin, Etoposide, or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 347 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 41 locations

  • Ramucirumab in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Including CNS Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ramucirumab in treating younger patients with solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors, that have come back or did not respond to previous treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Ramucirumab may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow.
    Location: 19 locations

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and tremelimumab work in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or do not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin works in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Melphalan, Carboplatin, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Progressive CNS Embryonal or Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate, and to see how well they work in treating patients with recurrent or progressive central nervous system (CNS) embryonal or germ cell tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving melphalan together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate may be an effective treatment for recurrent or progressive CNS embryonal or germ cell tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with recurrent or progressive germ cell tumors. The combination chemotherapy, consisting of gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel, and oxaliplatin stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy, including carboplatin, thiotepa, and etoposide, is given at high doses. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the high-dose chemotherapy.
    Location: Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Paclitaxel, Oxaliplatin, High-Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin, high dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with central nervous system germ cell tumors that have come back after a period of improvement or that have not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel and oxaliplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin, high dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with central nervous system term cell tumors.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have come back. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Also, monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can find cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Germ Cell Tumors

    Treatment options for relapsed or refractory germ cell tumors (GCT) patients are limited. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue (autologous stem cell transplant), when given sequentially, has shown that a subset of patients may be cured. The optimal high-dose chemotherapy regimen, however, is unknown. In this trial, we will use tandem autologous transplants with non-cross resistant conditioning regimens to treat patients with relapsed / refractory GCTs.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors.
    Location: Childrens Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed central nervous system germ cell tumors that have not spread to other parts of the brain, spinal canal, or body (localized). Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 146 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy and Iscomatrix with or without Cyclophosphamide and Celecoxib in Treating Patients with Thoracic Malignancies or Tumors That Have Spread to the Chest Cavity

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects of vaccine therapy and Iscomatrix (saponin-cholesterol-phospholipid adjuvant) with or without cyclophosphamide and celecoxib and to see how well they work in treating patients with lung cancer, esophageal cancer, thymic or mediastinal germ cell tumors, malignant pleural mesotheliomas, primary thoracic sarcomas (thoracic malignancies), or tumors that have spread to the chest cavity. Vaccines made from tumor cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Saponin-cholesterol-phospholipid adjuvant may also help to boost the immune system response to the vaccine. Cyclophosphamide is a chemotherapy drug that may decrease the number of a specific white blood cell allowing the vaccine to work better. Celecoxib may also have an effect on the immune system and may allow for a better immune reaction to the vaccine. It is not yet known whether vaccine therapy and saponin-cholesterol-phospholipid adjuvant are more effective with or without cyclophosphamide and celecoxib in treating patients with cancer of the chest cavity.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov