Treatment Clinical Trials for Cervical Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for cervical cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 68

  • A Trial of Tisotumab Vedotin in Cervical Cancer

    A Single arm, Multicenter, International Trial of Tisotumab Vedotin (HuMax®-TF-ADC) in Previously Treated, Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Adavosertib, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Cervical, Vaginal, or Uterine Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib when given together with external beam radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib, external beam radiation therapy, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Phase 1 / 2 Study to Investigate the Safety, Biologic and Anti-tumor Activity of ONCOS-102 in Combination With Durvalumab in Subjects With Advanced Peritoneal Malignancies

    This is a two-part Phase 1 / 2 dose escalation and dose expansion study of the GMCSFencoding adenovirus, ONCOS-102, in combination with anti-programmed death ligand-1 (PDL1) antibody, durvalumab, in adult subjects with peritoneal disease who have failed prior standard chemotherapy and have histologically confirmed platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer or colorectal cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Oligo-Recurrent Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with cancer that has come back and has spread to 5 or fewer places in the body (oligometastatic disease). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Oligometastatic Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with cancer that has spread to 5 or fewer places in the body and involves 3 or fewer organs (oligometastatic disease). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A First-in-human Study of ILDR2 (Immunoglobulin-like Domain Containing Receptor 2) Function-blocking Antibody BAY1905254

    The main purpose of this clinical study is to determine the most appropriate dose of the study medication that can be safely given to subjects, and to look at how the study medication is changed and distributed by the body.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Gynecologic Cancer That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy in treating patients with gynecologic cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with gynecologic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Internal Radiation Therapy with or without MRI Guidance in Treating Patients with Gynecologic Cancer

    This randomized clinical trial studies how well internal radiation therapy with or without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) works in treating patients with gynecologic cancer. Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Computer systems that allow doctors to create a 3-dimensional (3-D) picture of the tumor may help in planning radiation therapy and may result in more tumor cells being killed. Using a magnetic resonance (MR)-tracking device may improve the placement of the brachytherapy catheters.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of COTI-2 as Monotherapy or Combination Therapy for the Treatment of Malignancies

    Activity of COTI-2 has been demonstrated in various cancer tumor models. With its p53- and AKT-based mechanisms of action, COTI-2 is anticipated to be highly relevant in treatment of patients with gynecologic malignancies or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as well as a variety of other tumor types. This study is designed primarily to assess the safety and tolerability of COTI-2 monotherapy or combination therapy in patients with advanced and recurrent malignancies to establish a recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) for future studies. Patients are currently being recruited for Part 3 of the study. Critical Outcome Technologies Inc. has been renamed to Cotinga Pharmaceuticals.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Vaccine (TA-CIN) as Adjuvant Therapy in Treating Patients with HPV16 Related Stage IB1-IV Cervical Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of TA-CIN vaccine administered via arm or thigh in treating patients with HPV16 related stage IB1-IV cervical cancer. TA-CIN vaccine may teach the body’s immune system to recognize and get rid of the HPV16 virus. Giving TA-CIN after definitive treatment may kill any remaining tumor cells in patients with HPV16 related cervical cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of vaccine therapy in treating patients with tumors that have a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the surfaces of their cells. Vaccines made from a virus that has been modified to contain HER2 cells may help teach the immune system find and kill tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Patients Receiving High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Background: - One standard way of giving radiation is to combine external beam treatments with internal brachytherapy treatments, which involve short-range radiation therapy that gives a high dose of radiation directly to a cancer or to the area where cancer cells were removed. - Brachytherapy is done by placing hollow implant device(s) into the area to be treated and then moving a radiation source into each. The type of device depends on the type of cancer and the site to be treated. These devices can range from hollow applicators and needles to balloon-like equipment. Objectives: - To evaluate the quality of the brachytherapy procedure at the National Institutes of Health s Radiation Oncology Branch. Eligibility: - Patients with cancer who could potentially benefit from high-dose brachytherapy as part of their treatment. Design: - In conjunction with their existing treatment, patients will be treated with high-dose brachytherapy as determined appropriate for their particular type of cancer and cancer history. - Each treatment will take place in the Radiation Oncology Clinic. - If the patient does not have implant devices, the clinic staff will insert them and check their placement through a computed tomography (CT) scan. - The calculations to determine the appropriate brachytherapy dose will take a few hours; the brachytherapy treatment itself will take between 10 and 30 minutes. - The number of brachytherapy treatments will vary according to the individual needs and requirements of each type of cancer and each patient. - Patients will return to the Radiation Oncology Clinic for followup visits at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the completion of radiation therapy. Followup evaluations will include a medical history and physical examination, assessment of any side effects of radiation therapy, and a repeat of any imaging (i.e., CT, MRI, X-ray) that was done at baseline to evaluate the tumor response.
    Location: 2 locations

  • This is a Trial of MG1-E6E7 With Ad-E6E7 and Atezolizumab in Patients With HPV Associated Cancers

    This is a Phase 1 / 1b open-label dose escalation trial of Ad / MG1-E6E7 and sequential treatment with atezolizumab in patients with HPV associated cancers. This study will consist of two arms. Both arms will dose escalate (MG1-E6E7) using a 3 + 3 design in Phase 1 to establish initial safety and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) / maximum feasible dose (MFD). * Arm 1 - intravenous (IV) administration of MG1-E6E7 following intramuscular (IM) AD-E6E7 priming and subsequent treatment with IV atezolizumab. *Arm 2 - intratumoral (IT) and IV injection of MG1-E6E7 following (IM) Ad-E6E7 priming and subsequent treatment with IV atezolizumab. In the Phase 1b expansion for each arm, additional patients will be enrolled at the MTD as determined in Phase 1 in order to more thoroughly explore immune response, pharmacokinetics / dynamics, and safety for the patient populations with Cervical cancer, HPV positive (HPV+) Oropharyngeal cancer (Phase 1B, Arm 1, Cohorts A and B respectively) and HPV+ tumors with injectable lesions (Phase 1B, Arm 2, Cohort 3).
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and atezolizumab works in treating patients with cervical cancer that has come back, persistent, or has spread to other places in the body. SBRT uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving SBRT and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with cervical cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02385 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02385 in participants with advanced malignancies.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab in Treating Participants with Recurrent or High Grade Gynecologic Cancer with Metastatic Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab with or without ipilimumab in treating participants with female reproductive cancer that has come back or is high grade and has spread extensively throughout the peritoneal cavity. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Bevacizumab and Rucaparib in Recurrent Carcinoma of the Cervix or Endometrium

    This is a phase II study of rucaparib, a small molecule inhibitor poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP), being tested in combination with bevacizumab in patients with recurrent cervical or endometrial cancer. The objective of this study is to determine the proportion of these patients who survive progression-free for at least 6 months while receiving this drug combination.
    Location: 2 locations

  • DNA Plasmid-encoding Interleukin-12 / HPV DNA Plasmids Therapeutic Vaccine INO-3112 and Durvalumab in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Metastatic Human Papillomavirus Associated Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab work in treating participants with human papillomavirus associated cancers that have come back or spread to other places in the body. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DNA plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / HPV DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab may work better in treating participants with human papillomavirus associated cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • M7824 in Subjects With HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: In the United States, each year there are more than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers. Some of these cancers are often incurable and are not improved by standard therapies. Researchers want to see if a new drug M7824, which targets and blocks a pathway that prevents the immune system from effectively fighting the cancer can shrink tumors in people with some HPV cancers. Objectives: To see if the drug M7824 causes tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who have a cancer associated with HPV infection. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will review their symptoms and how they perform normal activities. They will have body scans. They will give blood and urine samples. They will have a sample of their tumor tissue taken if one is not available. Participants will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Then they will get the study drug through a thin tube in an arm vein. Participants will get the drug every 2 weeks for 26 times (1 year). This is 1 course. After the course, participants will be monitored but will not take the study drug. If their condition gets worse, they will start another course with the drug. This process can be repeated as many times as needed. Treatment will stop if the participant has bad side effects or the drug stops working. Throughout the study, participants will repeat some or all the screening tests. After participants stop taking the drug, they will have a follow-up visit and repeat some screening tests. They will get periodic follow-up phone calls.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Avelumab, Utomilumab, Anti-OX40 Antibody PF-04518600, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Participants with Advanced Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of avelumab when given in different combinations with utomilumab, anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600, radiation therapy, and cisplatin in treating participants with malignancies that have spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, utomilumab, and anti-OX40 antibody PF-04518600, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high-energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well avelumab works in combination with these other anti-cancer therapies in participants with advanced malignancies.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Text or Voice Messages in Improving Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well text or voice messages work in improving physical activity in cancer survivors. Physical activity may protect from cancer and may even reduce the risk of cancer recurrence. New technology, such as text and voice messages, may help cancer survivors to become more active.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Gynecologic Cancers

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy works in treating patients with gynecologic cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging may be able to successfully guide the placement of the brachytherapy applicator and may help in assessing the tumor better at the time of brachytherapy as compared to routinely used computed tomography scan in treating gynecologic cancers.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Doxycycline in Treating Patients with Localized Breast, Uterine, or Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride works together with doxycycline in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Doxycycline may stop the growth of bacteria by keeping them from making proteins and minimized the toxic side effects of anti-cancer therapy. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride together with doxycycline may be a better way in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with HLA-A*02 Positive Relapsed, Refractory, or Metastatic HPV16-Related Oropharyngeal, Cervical, or Anal Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies side effects and best dose of HPV16-E711-19 nanomer vaccine DPX-E7 and to see how well it works when given together with cyclophosphamide in treating patients with HLA-A*02 positive, human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-related oropharyngeal, cervical, or anal cancer that has come back, does not respond to treatment, or has spread to other parts of the body. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving HPV16-E711-19 nanomer vaccine DPX-E7 together with cyclophosphamide may work better in treating patients with HPV16-related oropharyngeal, cervical, or anal cancer.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Dose Escalation Study of GSK3326595 in Subjects With Solid Tumors and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    The study drug, GSK3326595, is an inhibitor of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) that potently inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo in animal models. This first time in human (FTIH), open-label, dose escalation study will assess the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary clinical activity of GSK3326595 in subjects with advanced or recurrent solid tumors, as well as clinical activity in subjects with a subset of solid tumors and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This is an open-label, repeat-dose, multicenter, 2-part study to establish the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) / recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) based on safety and tolerability and preliminary clinical efficacy of orally-administered GSK3326595. Part 1 is a dose-escalation phase to identify the MTD / RP2D based on the safety, PK, and PD profiles observed after oral administration of GSK3326595 and to preliminarily identify whether or not there is an effect of fed versus fasted state on the PK of GSK3326595. This Part will be conducted in adult subjects with relapsed and / or refractory solid tumors. It is estimated that up to 66 subjects will be enrolled into the dose escalation cohort of the study, including up to 42 subjects to identify the MTD and approximately 12 subjects in the PK / PD / metabolite / biomarker expansion cohort(s) and approximately 12 subjects in the food effect sub-study. Disease-specific expansion cohorts (Part 2) are planned to further explore clinical activity of GSK3326595 in subjects with selected solid tumors and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. It is estimated that up to 251 subjects will be enrolled in the disease-specific expansion cohorts of the study. The duration of study will depend on recruitment rates and the timing of subjects' duration on study (withdrawal rates due to toxicity or progression), with an approximate duration of 2 years.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York