Treatment Clinical Trials for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 160

  • Bendamustine, Rituximab, and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well bendamustine, rituximab, and venetoclax work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine, rituximab, and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Venetoclax may also block proteins present on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Giving bendamustine and rituximab followed by venetoclax may increase response to therapy and reduce the risk of complications.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Total Body Irradiation before TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes Donor Transplant in Treating Participants with High-Risk Myeloid Diseases

    This phase I trial studies how well reduced intensity chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes donor transplant) works in treating participants with high-risk myeloid diseases. Giving chemotherapy such as anti-thymocyte globulin and fludarabine phosphate, as well as total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the participant's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Venetoclax, Rituximab, and Rituximab and Hyaluronidase Human in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well venetoclax, rituximab, and rituximab and hyaluronidase human work in treating participants with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab and rituximab and hyaluronidase human, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread or may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax, rituximab, and rituximab and hyaluronidase human may work better in treating participants with recurrent or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Phase I / II Study of Venetoclax or Lenalidomide in Combination With Ublituximab and Umbralisib in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory CLL / SLL and NHL

    Phase I / II Study of Venetoclax or Lenalidomide in Combination with Ublituximab and Umbralisib in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory CLL / SLL and NHL
    Location: 2 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma after Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent, called CalichDMH. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers CalichDMH to kill them.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with Vitamin D Deficiency

    This randomized pilot early phase I trial studies how well cholecalciferol works in treating patients with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia with low levels of vitamin D (vitamin D deficiency). Cholecalciferol may increase levels of vitamin D and improve survival in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia receiving standard of care chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of JBH492 Monotherapy in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL)

    The purpose of the First-In-Human study is to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), immunogenicity and preliminary efficacy of JBH492 as single agent.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes in the Treatment of Patients With CLL or SLL

    This is a Phase 1 / 2, study evaluating IOV-2001 (Adoptive Cell Therapy) composed of autologous PBL (Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes) in patients with CLL / SLL, which has relapsed or is relapsing during treatment with ibrutinib or acalabrutinib.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Genetically Engineered Cells (CD22-CAR T Cells) for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory B Cell Malignancies

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and how well cell therapy (CD22-CAR T cells) works for the treatment of B cell malignancies that have come back (recurrent) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). The antigen CD22 is commonly found on B cell cancers. In this study, a CD22 gene and a type of virus (lentivirus; a virus similar to HIV) are used in making the cells (CD22-CAR T cells). The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells can recognize and respond to a specific molecule, such as CD22 protein. This uses a portion of an antibody to CD22 and part of a molecule that activates or ‘turns on’ the immune cell. Together, the CAR may help these T cells find the cancer in the body. Giving chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide) before CD22-CAR T cells may help prepare the immune system to accept the CD22-CAR T cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • CD19-specific CAR-T Cells in CLL / SLL and DLBCL

    This is a first-in-human study to evaluate the feasibility, safety and preliminary antitumor efficacy of autologous T cells genetically engineered with a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and manufactured with a new process. CAR-T cells will be investigated in combination with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) / small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) and as single agent in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Copanlisib and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Richter's Transformation or Transformed Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and how well copanlisib when given together with nivolumab works in treating patients with Richter's transformation or transformed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Copanlisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving copanlisib and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with Richter's transformation or transformed non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • CYC065 CDK Inhibitor and Venetoclax Study in Relapsed / Refractory CLL

    A Phase I Combination Study of CYC065 and Venetoclax for Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pevonedistat and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat when given together with ibrutinib in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or has stopped responding to other treatments (refractory). Pevonedistat and ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Personalized Neoantigen Cancer Vaccine with and without Low-Dose Cyclophosphamide or Pembrolizumab for the Treatmen IGHV Unmutated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    This early phase I trial studies the effects of personalized neoantigen cancer vaccine with and without low-dose cyclophosphamide or pembrolizumab in treating patients with IGVH unmutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Personalized neoantigen cancer vaccine will consist of up to 20 of these peptides as well as a drug called Poly-ICLC. Poly-ICLC binds proteins on the surface of certain immune cells to make it appear as if a virus is present. When the cells detect the vaccine, they think it is a virus and turn on the immune system. Chemotherapy drugs, such as low-dose cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study examines the feasibility and safety in giving personalized neoantigen cancer vaccine with and without low-dose cyclophosphamide or pembrolizumab to patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • huCART19-IL18 Cells for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory CD19+ Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial finds out the best dose, possible benefits and / or side effects huCART19-IL18 cells in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). huCART19-IL18 cells are patients white blood cells, called T cells, which are modified to target the cancer cells or cells that help the cancer to grow. huCART19-IL18 cells target a marker on NHL and CLL cells called CD19 and also produce interleukin (IL) 18. huCART19-IL18 cells are designed to identify and kill a type of white blood cell called a “B-cell”, which are the cancerous cells in patients with NHL and CLL. By eliminating B-cells, huCART19 may help control NHL or CLL.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Acalabrutinib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the effect of acalabrutinib in treating autoimmune hemolytic anemia that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Acalabrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Acalabrutinib, Umbralisib, and Ublituximab for the Treatment of Previously Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the effect of acalabrutinib, umbralisib, and ublituximab in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma that is previously untreated, has come back (relapsed), or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Acalabrutinib is a type of drug called a kinase inhibitor. It blocks a type of protein called Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) that helps chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells live and grow. By blocking BTK, acalabrutinib may kill cancer cells or stop them from growing. Umbralisib is an investigational drug which blocks a protein called PI3K. PI3K is a protein that plays a role in the way cells grow. Early clinical trials have shown that umbralisib can kill cancer cells in some patients and cause their tumors to shrink. Ublituximab is a type of investigational drug called a monoclonal antibody. A monoclonal antibody is a type of protein made in the laboratory that can locate and bind to substances in the body, including tumor cells. By binding to the tumor cells, the antibody might prevent the tumor cell from growing and spreading. Giving acalabrutinib, umbralisib, and ublituximab may work better in controlling cancer growth in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Donor-Derived 19-28z CAR T cells following Allogeneic Transplant for the Treatment of CD19 Malignancies

    This phase I trial evaluates the side effects and best dose of donor-derived CAR T cells following allogeneic stem cell transplantation in treating patients with CD19 malignancies. T cells are infection fighting blood cells that can kill tumor cells. The T cells given have a new gene put in them that makes them able to recognize CD19, a protein on the surface of cancer cells. These CD19-specific T cells may help the body's immune system identify and kill CD19+ cancer cells. Giving 19-28z CAR T cells after stem cell transplantation from a donor (allogeneic) may reduce the risk of relapse (cancer coming back) after transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Cirmtuzumab and Venetoclax as Consolidation Therapy for the Treatment of Patients with Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma / Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Previously Treated with Venetoclax

    This phase II trial studies the effect of cirmtuzumab in combination with venetoclax when given as consolidation therapy in treating patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) / chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have been previously treated with venetoclax. Cirmtuzumab is a type of drug called a monoclonal antibody that is designed to attach to a protein called ROR1 that is on the surface of CLL cells. Cirmtuzumab blocks the growth and survival of the CLL cells. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving cirmtuzumab with venetoclax may reduce the number of cancer cells that may be left in the bone marrow or in the blood, which may lead to a better chance of patients remaining in remission.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • 19(T2)28z1xx Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells for the Treatment of B-Cell Cancers

    This phase I trial investigates the best dose and side effects of 19(T2)28z1xx chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells in treating patients with B-cell cancers that have come back after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). 19(T2)28z1xx CAR T cells are made in the laboratory using the patient's collected white blood cells (T cells). T cells are important protective cells of the immune system. The T cells have been genetically modified (changes are made to the DNA or genes) to help them identify, fight, or kill cancer cells. A virus (retrovirus) is used to introduce a gene that creates a protein (called a chimeric antigen receptor or CAR) on the surface of T cells to identify and kill cancer cells. The retrovirus then becomes inactive. The 19(T2)28z1xx CAR T cells can recognize a protein called CD19, which is found on the surface of B-cell cancer cells, and destroy those cells. The purpose of this trial is to test the safety of 19(T2)28z1xx CAR T cells in patients with relapsed / refractory B-cell cancers.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Study of a Triple Combination Therapy, DTRM-555, in Patients With R / R CLL or R / R Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    Targeted drug therapies have greatly improved outcomes for patients with relapsed or refractory (R / R) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, single drug therapies have limitations, therefore, the current study is evaluating a novel oral combination of targeted drugs as a way of overcoming these limitations. This study will determine the efficacy of the triple combination therapy, DTRM-555, in patients with R / R CLL or R / R non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics Study of KPG-818 in Hematological Malignancies Subjects

    This is a Phase 1 study to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics(PK), and preliminary clinical activity of KPG-818 as a single agent in adult subjects with selected hematological malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), indolent lymphoma, adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This study will assist in identifying appropriate, well tolerated doses that can be administered in subsequent studies in subjects with selected hematological malignancies.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • T Lymphocytes Expressing the Kappa Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) and CD28 Endodomain for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory B cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of T lymphocytes expressing the kappa CAR and CD28 endodomain (CAR.kappa.28) in treating patients with kappa-positive B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) / small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). The treatment tested in this study uses modified T-cells called autologous T lymphocyte chimeric antigen receptor (ATLCAR) cells targeted against the kappa light chain antibody on cancer cells. The anti-kappa light chain antibody has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood, a part of it is now joined to the T cells. Only the part of the antibody that sticks to the lymphoma cells is attached to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way, it is called a chimeric receptor. These kappa light chain chimeric (combination) receptor-activated T cells, which are called ATLCAR.kappa.28, can kill some of the tumor. They do not, however, last very long in the body and so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant with Treosulfan, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation for the Treatment of Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor stem cell transplant, treosulfan, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation work in treating patients with blood cancers (hematological malignancies). Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Acalabrutinib and Venetoclax with or without Early Obinutuzumab for the Treatment of High Risk, Recurrent, or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well acalabrutinib and venetoclax with or without early obinutuzumab work for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma that is high risk, has come back (recurrent), or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Acalabrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Venetoclax may stop the growth cancer cells by blocking BCL-2 protein needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving acalabrutinib and venetoclax together with early obinutuzumab may improve clinical outcomes and control the disease.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas