Melanoma Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for melanoma. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 276-295 of 295
< Previous 1 ... 10 11 12

  • FDG PET / CT in Measuring Early Response in Patients with Advanced Metastatic Melanoma Receiving Pembrolizumab

    This pilot research trial studies how well fluorodeoxyglucose F-18 (FDG) positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT) works in measuring early response to treatment with pembrolizumab in patients with melanoma that has spread to other places in the body. Diagnostic procedures, such as FDG PET / CT, may help show if melanoma tumors are responding to treatment within the first few weeks of starting pembrolizumab.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Genetic Analysis of Blood and Tissue Samples from Patients with Advanced Cancer, Moonshot Study

    This trial studies the genetic analysis of blood and tissue samples from patients with cancer that has spread to other anatomic sites (advanced) or is no longer responding to treatment. Studying these samples in the laboratory may help doctors to learn how genes affect cancer and how they affect a person’s response to treatment.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Dermoscopic Patterns Analysis in Stratifying Skin Melanoma Risk in Patients with a High-Risk Nevus Phenotype

    This pilot research trial studies dermoscopic patterns in stratifying skin melanoma risk in patients with a high-risk nevus phenotype. Studying the dermoscopic patterns may improve doctors' ability to identify which people with many moles on their skin are most likely to develop skin melanoma. It may also help doctors use this information to customize and tailor melanoma screening to the individual patient based on a better estimate of their individual risk.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Melanoma Patients' Decision to Have or to Decline Immunotherapy after Surgery

    This trial studies melanoma patients' decision to have or to decline immunotherapy after surgery. Receiving treatment after surgery to try to reduce the risk of disease returning is called adjuvant treatment. Studying patients' decision about receiving treatment after surgery may help doctors identify factors that patients consider when deciding whether or not to receive adjuvant treatment and how patients feel about their decision after one year.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Long-term, Non-interventional, Observational Study Following Treatment With Fate Therapeutics FT500 Cellular Immunotherapy

    Subjects who previously took part in the FT500-101 study and received allogeneic NK cell immunotherapy will take part in this long term follow-up study. Subjects will automatically enroll into study FT-003 once they have withdrawn or complete the parent interventional study. The purpose of this study is to provide long-term safety and survival data for subjects who have participated in the parent study. No additional study drug will be given, but subjects can receive other therapies for their cancer while they are being followed for long term safety in this study.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Pharmacogenomics Testing in Directing the Optimal Use of Supportive Care Medications in Patients with Stage III-IV Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well a genetic test called pharmacogenomics works in directing the optimal use of supportive care medications in patients with stage III-IV cancer. Pharmacogenomics is the study of how genes may affect the body’s response to and interaction with some prescription medications. Genes, which are inherited from parents, carry information that determines things such as eye color and blood type. Genes can also influence how patients process and respond to medications. Depending on the genetic makeup, some medications may work faster or slower or produce more or fewer side effects. Pharmacogenomics testing may help doctors learn more about how patients break down and process specific medications based on their genes and improve the quality of life of cancer patients receiving clinical care.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Scottsdale, Arizona

  • Influenza Vaccine Response in Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Melanoma

    This trial studies response to influenza vaccine in patients with melanoma that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic). After exposure to a potential pathogen or vaccine, the body’s white blood cells are mobilized to help defend the body. Some of these white blood cells are known as T cells. As the infection is passing, the immune system is left with a “memory” of the infection in the T cells, which can then recognize the pathogen much more quickly the next time the infection occurs. Memory T cells are also formed after vaccination. However, many aspects of memory T cell formation are unknown, especially for those T cells that help other cells, known as T helper cells or CD4 cells. T helper cell help is critical for later production of the proteins that help defend against influenza infection. Understanding the establishment of memory cells may help future efforts to develop better vaccines.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Collection of Blood Samples in Detecting Circulating Tumor Material from Patients with Stage IIA-IVB Colorectal Cancer or Stage IIB-IV Melanoma

    This clinical trial studies the collection of blood samples in detecting circulating tumor material from patients with stage IIA-IVB colorectal cancer or stage IIB-IV melanoma. Collected blood samples may help to provide insight into the detection of colorectal cancer and melanoma in the blood before it can be found by other methods or provide a method of monitoring the status of colorectal cancer and melanoma throughout a treatment course.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Genetic Analysis in Understanding Immunotherapy Resistance in Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This pilot research trial studies genetic alterations in tissue samples from patients with stage III-IV melanoma undergoing immunotherapy. Studying specific cancer-associated genetic changes in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about immunotherapy resistance and improve ways to treat adult patients with melanoma undergoing immunotherapy.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Tissue and Blood Biomarkers from Patients with Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma Treated with Ipilimumab with or without Sargramostim

    This research trial studies tissue and blood biomarkers in patients with stage III melanoma or stage IV melanoma treated with ipilimumab with or without sargramostim. Studying samples of tissue and blood in the laboratory from patients treated with ipilimumab with or without sargramostim may help doctors learn more about the effects of ipilimumab and sargramostim on cells. It may also help doctors understand how well patients respond to treatment.
    Location: ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Cancer Risk in Carriers of the Gene for Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    This study will determine if family members of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) have various abnormalities, including: skin abnormalities; nervous system abnormalities, such as hearing problems; skin, eye, or internal cancers, or other changes. XP is a rare inherited disease that involves an inability to repair damage to cell DNA (genetic material). It can affect several organ systems, including the skin, eye, nervous system, and bones. Patients have a more than thousand-fold increase in frequency in all major skin cancers. Parents of patients with XP are carriers of the abnormal XP gene. Other family members may also be carriers of the abnormal XP gene. Carriers do not develop the disease themselves; symptoms develop only in children who have inherited the faulty gene from both parents. This study will try to clarify the genetic basis for XP and to understand the increased frequency of cancer in the disease. XP patients who have been evaluated at the NIH Clinical Center and their relatives are eligible for this study. Newly diagnosed XP patients are also eligible. Spouses of relatives will also be included as control subjects. Patients and their family members will undergo some or all of the following procedures: - Parental permission to review the child s relevant medical records and pathology material from treatments or surgery for cancer or other related illnesses - Medical history and physical examination, with particular attention to the skin and possible eye, hearing or neurological examinations - Photographs to document skin and other physical findings - Nuclear medicine scans to evaluate the brain and nervous system - X-rays of the skull or other parts of the body - Nervous system testing with an electroencephalogram (EEG), electroretinogram (ERG), electromyogram (EMG) or nerve conduction velocity measurement - Collection of blood and skin samples for gene studies - Establishment of cell lines from collected blood or tissues to study DNA repair, skin cancer, cancers related to XP, immune defects, and related studies. - Biopsy (surgical removal of a small piece of tissue) of suspicious skin lesions for examination under a microscope - Collection of a cheek cell sample, obtained by twirling a soft brush against the inside of the cheek - Collection of a hair sample for microscopic examination and composition analysis - Surgery to treat skin cancers or other lesions
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Clinical, Laboratory, and Epidemiologic Characterization of Individuals and Families at High Risk of Melanoma

    This study will investigate how genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of melanoma, a type of skin cancer, and related conditions. Individuals of any age with a personal or family history of melanoma may be eligible for this study. Participants will: - Fill out one or two questionnaires about their personal and family medical history. - Provide written consent for researchers to review their medical records and pathology materials related to their care and those of deceased relatives with melanomas, tumors, cancer, or other related illnesses for whom they are the next-of-kin or legally authorized representative. - Donate a blood or cheek cell sample to be used for genetic studies. (The blood sample is collected through a needle in an arm vein. The cheek cell sample is obtained either by gently brushing the inside of the mouth with a soft brush or by swishing a tablespoon of mouthwash and then spitting it into a container.) - Undergo a skin biopsy (removal of a small piece of skin tissue) for genetic study. For this procedure, the area of skin to be removed is numbed with a local anesthetic and a 1 / 4-inch piece of skin is excised with a cookie cutter-like instrument. The wound is then covered with a band-aid. Participants may be asked to travel to the NIH Clinical Center for evaluation, including a medical history, physical examination, and some of the following procedures: - Full body skin examination to evaluate the type and number of moles and document any evidence of sun damage to the skin. The examination involves all the skin from the scalp to the bottoms of the feet. After the examination, a medical photographer will photograph the skin, with close-ups of skin lesions marked by the examiner. If there are parts of the skin the participant does not want examined or photographed, he or she can tell the examiner. - Blood draw of about 120 milliliters (4 ounces) or less - Skin biopsy - Cheek cell sample - X-rays, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to detect tumors or changes in tumors or other types of changes in specific tissues. MRI is a diagnostic test that uses strong magnetic fields and radiowaves to examine body tissues. The subject lies on a table that is moved into a large tunnel-like machine (the scanner) for about 45 minutes to 1 hour. When the tests are finished, a doctor will discuss the results with the participant and the need, if any, for clinical follow-up.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Eligibility Screening and Tissue Procurement for the NIH Intramural Research Program Clinical Protocols

    The purpose of this protocol is to provide patients with adequate informed consent to understand that screening tests with minimal health risk will be performed to evaluate their eligibility for a research study. The protocol makes it clear that patients initial visit to the intramural clinical program may include screening studies that are not medically necessary for disease management, but are done purely for research purposes. Patients with a known or suspected diagnosis of cancer, HIV infection, skin disorder or immunodeficiency who are being considered for enrollment in a National Cancer Institute intramural clinical research protocol will participate in this consent protocol. It informs patients of screening tests and procedures involving minimal risk that are done for research purposes only, including blood tests, electrocardiogram, standard X-rays (e.g., chest X-ray), bone films, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and nuclear medicine studies. It explains that other eligibility screens that are more invasive and involve greater risk, such as a biopsy, will require separate consent. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Evaluation for NCI Surgery Branch Clinical Research Protocols

    Background: The National Cancer Institute Surgery Branch (NCI-SB) has developed experimental therapies that involve taking white blood cells from patients' tumor or from their blood, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. Objective: This study will allow patients to under screening and evaluation for participation in NC-SB Protocols. Eligibility: Patients 18 years or older must meet the minimum eligibility criteria for an NCI-SB treatment protocol. Design Patients will undergo testing and evaluations as required by the appropriate NCI-SB treatment protocol. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Registry of Patients With Primary Choroidal Melanoma (CM) or Indeterminate Lesions (ILs)

    The purpose of this observational research study is to follow participants who have been treated with either AU-011 or observation and / or received standard of care therapy while participating in a previous Aura Biosciences clinical research study to assess the long-term safety and effectiveness of AU-011 and standard of care therapy. This study will collect information from procedures conducted as part of routine follow-up eye care and cancer care.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Postmarketing Prospective Study of Melanoma Patients Treated With IMLYGIC® to Characterize Risk of Herpetic Infection

    A Postmarketing Prospective Cohort Study of Melanoma Patients Treated With IMLYGIC® (Talimogene Laherparepvec) in Clinical Practice to Characterize the Risk of Herpetic Infection Among Patients, Close Contacts, and Health Care Providers; and Long-term Safety in Treated Patients
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of Tumor Tissue From Patients With Melanoma Treated on Clinical Trial EST-1690

    This research study is looking at tumor tissue samples from patients with melanoma treated on clinical trial EST-1690. Studying samples of tumor tissue from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer. It may also help doctors predict how patients will respond to treatment.
    Location: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Satisfaction with Facial Appearance and Scar Outcome in Participants with Skin Cancer on the Face after Surgery

    This trial studies satisfaction with facial appearance and scar outcome in participants with skin cancer on the face after surgery. Assessing participants' satisfaction following treatment may help to better advise and counsel participants to improve their care.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Follow Up Protocol for Subjects Previously Enrolled on NCI Surgery Branch Studies

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed experimental therapies that involve taking white blood cells from patients' tumor or from their blood, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. Objective: This study will allow patients to be followed for up to 15 years following treatment on an NCI Surgery Branch Gene Therapy Trial as required by the FDA. Eligibility: Patients must have been enrolled on an NCI Surgery Branch Gene Therapy Protocol Design Patients will be followed with a physical examination and blood tests for up to 15 years as required by the FDA
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Harvesting Cells for Experimental Cancer Treatments

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed experimental therapies that involve taking white blood cells from patients' tumor or from their blood, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. Objective: This study will collect white blood cells from normal volunteers and white blood cells and / or tumor cells, from patients who have been screened for and are eligible for a NCI Surgery Branch treatment protocol. The cells collected from normal volunteers will be used as growth factors for the cells during the period of laboratory growth. The cells and / or tumor from patients will be used to make the cell treatment product. Eligibility: Patients must be eligible for a NCI Surgery Branch Treatment Protocol Normal Volunteers must meet the criteria for blood donation Design Both patients and normal Volunteers will undergo apheresis. Patients will then undergo further testing as required by the treatment protocol. There is no required follow up for normal volunteers.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland


< Previous 1 ... 10 11 12