Treatment Clinical Trials for Neuroblastoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for neuroblastoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-72 of 72

  • Next Generation Personalized Neuroblastoma Therapy with Ribociclib and Ceritinib, Trametinib, or HDM2 Inhibitor HDM201 in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ribociclib when given together with ceritinib, and HDM2 inhibitor HDM201, and to also see how well ribociclib and ceritinib, trametinib, or HDM2 inhibitor HDM201 work in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Ribociclib, ceritinib, trametinib, and HDM2 inhibitor HDM201 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Assigning patients to different treatment groups with ribociclib and ceritinib, trametinib, or HDM2 inhibitor HDM201 based on genetic testing may work better in treating neuroblastoma.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells and Hu3F8 in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural killer cells when given together with humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 (hu3F8) in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has not responded to standard treatment or has returned after treatment. Natural killer cells are a type of white blood cell that can recognize and kill abnormal cells in the body, and can work together with antibodies to kill target cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, can recognize a specific protein present on the target cancer cells. Giving donor natural killer cells together with humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Trial of Tolcapone With Oxaliplatin for Neuroblastoma

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate an investigational drug (Tolcapone) alone and in combination with oxaliplatin, for relapsed and refractory neuroblastoma. Tolcapone is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for adults, but is an investigational drug in this study because it has not been approved in pediatrics for this indication. Oxaliplatin, although a drug approved by the FDA for other cancers, is investigational for treatment of neuroblastoma in this study. This study will look at the safety and tolerability of tolcapone in combination with oxaliplatin as well as the tumors response to this study drug.
    Location: Rady Children's Hospital - San Diego, San Diego, California

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Iobenguane I-131 in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Neuroblastoma or Non-neuroblastic Iobenguane Avid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well iobenguane I-131 works in treating patients with neuroblastoma or non-neuroblastic iobenguane avid tumors that has come back after a period of improvement or that does not respond to treatment. Iobenguane I-131 may help deliver radiation to the tumor cells and cause them to die.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • Genetically Modified T-Cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cells in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Placing a patient's modified gene into white blood cells may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington

  • Reduced-Dose Radiation Therapy after Chemotherapy and Surgery in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This pilot clinical trial studies using a lower dose of radiation therapy in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is likely to come back (high-risk) after they have undergone chemotherapy and surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy protons to kill tumor cells. After patients undergo chemotherapy and surgery to remove the tumor, radiation therapy is given to help prevent the tumor from coming back. Giving a lower dose of radiation therapy may still reduce the risk that the tumor will return but cause fewer side effects.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Study of DFMO in Combination With Bortezomib for Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate an investigational drug (DFMO) in combination with bortezomib, for relapsed and refractory neuroblastoma. DFMO is an investigational drug because it has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study will look at the safety and tolerability of DFMO in combination with bortezomib as well as the tumors response to this study drug.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well proton beam radiation therapy works in treating patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Proton beam radiation therapy delivers radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells while causing less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Anti-GD2 Monoclonal Antibody Hu14.18K322A and Combination Chemotherapy before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Previously Untreated High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu14.18K322A and combination chemotherapy before autologous stem cell transplant and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with previously untreated high-risk neuroblastoma. Giving chemotherapy before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Also, monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu14.18K322A, can find cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Naxitamab and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of naxitamab and how well it works when given together with sargramostim in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (recurrent). Immunotherapy with naxitamab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving naxitamab together with sargramostim may be an effective treatment for patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Intensity-Modulated or Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Together with or without Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Stage III-IVB Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well giving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) together with or without cisplatin works in treating patients with stage III-IVB paranasal sinus and nasal cavity cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays and other types of radiation to kill tumor cells. Giving radiation therapy in different ways may kill more tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving IMRT or PBRT together with cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • OPT-821 with Vaccine Therapy and Beta-Glucan in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of OPT-821 (saponin-based immunoadjuvant OBI-821) with vaccine therapy when given together with beta-glucan and how well the regimen works in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma that is likely to recur (come back), or spread (high-risk). Biological therapies, such as OPT-821 and beta-glucan, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Vaccines may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Giving OPT-821 with vaccine therapy together with beta-glucan may be an effective treatment for high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Iobenguane I-131 in Treating Patients with Recurrent Neuroblastoma, Malignant Pheochromocytoma, or Malignant Paraganglioma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of targeted radiation therapy with iobenguane I-131 and to see how well it works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or has not responded to treatment, or pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma that has spread to other places in the body. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Tumors in the Brain and / or Spinal Cord

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody 8H9 in treating patients with tumors in the brain and / or spinal cord that have come back or have not responded to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies can find tumor cells and carry tumor-killing substances to them. The antibody 8H9 can carry a radioactive substance, such as iodine I 131, to tumor cells and may help kill them.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Study Of Palbociclib Combined With Chemotherapy In Pediatric Patients With Recurrent / Refractory Solid Tumors

    This study will evaluate palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy (temozolomide and irinotecan) in children, adolescents and young adults with recurrent or refractory solid tumors. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy in order to estimate the maximum tolerated dose. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy will be evaluated.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Study of Therapeutic Iobenguane (131-I) for Relapsed, High-Risk Neuroblastoma Subjects

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 131I-MIBG in patients with neuroblastoma, who relapsed.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Immunotherapy of Relapsed Refractory Neuroblastoma With Expanded NK Cells

    This NANT trial will determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of autologous expanded natural killer (NK) cells when combined with standard dosing of ch14.18 and will assess the feasibility of adding lenalidomide at the recommended Phase II dose of the expanded NK cells with ch14.18, for treatment of children with refractory or recurrent neuroblastoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Vorinostat and Iobenguane I 131 in Treating Patients With Resistant or Relapsed Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of giving vorinostat together with iobenguane I 131 in treating patients with resistant or relapsed neuroblastoma. Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I 131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Giving vorinostat together with iobenguane I 131 may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 16 locations

  • Artesunate in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of artesunate in treating patients with solid tumors. Artesunate may help treat cancer caused by the human papillomavirus.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia