Treatment Clinical Trials for Prostate Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for prostate cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 301-315 of 315
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  • Single-Port Versus Multi-Port Robotic Radical Prostatectomy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    This phase III trial compares the effect of single-port versus multi-port robotic radical prostatectomy in treating patients with prostate cancer. Single-port robotic radical prostatectomy is a surgery during which a single incision is made. Multi-port robotic radical prostatectomy is a surgery during which six small incisions are made. This study aims to understand whether a single incision surgery ends up with better recovery after surgery.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Curcumin and Ursolic Acid for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects of curcumin and ursolic acid, as well as their rate of absorption in the blood (bioavailability), their absorption in the prostate, and their interactions and effect within the body in patients with prostate cancer. Dietary supplements, such as curcumin and ursolic acid, may slow the growth of prostate cancer. This trial may help researchers learn if a combination of curcumin and ursolic acid has greater combined (synergistic) absorption in the body, which may lead to future clinical trials and ultimately to a safe and effective treatment in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer to reduce the progression of disease.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • CASPAR, A Clinical Study Evaluating The Benefit of Adding Rucaparib to Enzalutamide for Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer That Has Become Resistant To Testosterone-Deprivation Therapy

    This phase III trial compares the addition of rucaparib to enzalutamide with enzalutamide alone for the treatment of men with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and has become resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy. Testosterone is a hormone made mainly in the testes and is needed to develop and maintain male sex characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle growth. It also plays role in prostate cancer development. Enzalutamide may help fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells for growth. PARPs are proteins that help repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as rucaparib, can keep PARPs from working , so tumor cells can't repair themselves. This may stop tumor cells from growing. Giving enzalutamide and rucaparib may prolong patients’ survival and / or prevent their cancer from growing or spreading for a longer time. It may also help doctors learn if a mutation in any of the specific DNA repair (homologous recombination) genes is helpful in selecting the most appropriate treatment for the patient.
    Location: 68 locations

  • Enzalutamide with Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with enzalutamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as enzalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Venetoclax may target a special group of prostate cancer cells that is known to lead to resistance to treatment. Giving enzalutamide and venetoclax may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Enzalutamide and Relacorilant in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of enzalutamide and relacorilant in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs, such as enzalutamide and relacorilant, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. It is not yet known whether enzalutamide and relacorilant may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Apalutamide and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog with or without Abiraterone Acetate in Treating Participants with Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well apalutamide and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog with or without abiraterone acetate work in treating participants with prostate cancer prior to surgery. Apalutamide and abiraterone acetate may stop the growth of cancer cells either by killing the cells or by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hormone therapy, using gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog, may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone the body makes. Giving apalutamide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog, and abiraterone acetate may work better in treating participants with prostate cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Olaparib, Cabazitaxel, Carboplatin, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib, cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving olaparib, cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • PI3K-beta Inhibitor GSK2636771 and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Cancer and PTEN Loss

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of PI3K-beta inhibitor GSK2636771 when given together with pembrolizumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage III-IV cancer and PTEN loss. PI3K-beta inhibitor GSK2636771 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving PI3K-beta inhibitor GSK2636771 and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with metastatic cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Abiraterone Acetate, Niclosamide, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well abiraterone acetate, niclosamide, and prednisone work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cells. Hormone therapy using abiraterone acetate may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes. Niclosamide is a drug that may block another signal that can cause prostate cancer cell growth. Prednisone is a drug that can help lessen inflammation. Giving abiraterone acetate, niclosamide, and prednisone may be a better treatment for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or to other parts of the body. Specialized radiation therapy, such as proton beam radiation therapy, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12D Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy takes white blood cells from a person, grows them in a lab, genetically changes them, then gives them back to the person. Researchers think this may help attack tumors in people with certain cancers. It is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells are safe and cause tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults ages 18-70 who have cancer with a molecule on the tumors that can be recognized by the study cells Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, scans, photography, and heart, lung, and lab tests. An intravenous (IV) catheter will be placed in a large vein in the chest. Participants will have leukapheresis. Blood will be removed through a needle in an arm. A machine will divide the blood and collect white blood cells. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant through a needle in the other arm. A few weeks later, participants will have a hospital stay. They will: - Get 2 chemotherapy medicines by IV over 5 days. - Get the changed cells through the catheter. Get up to 9 doses of a medicine to help the cells. They may get a shot to stimulate blood cells. - Recover in the hospital for up to 3 weeks. They will provide blood samples. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have several follow-up visits over 2 years. They will repeat most of the screening tests and may have leukapheresis. Participants blood will be collected for several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Apalutamide, Abiraterone Acetate, and Prednisone in Treating Participants with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well apalutamide and abiraterone acetate work in treating participants with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Abiraterone acetate and apalutamide may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as prednisone, is used to decrease the body’s immune response and may improve bone marrow function. Giving apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone may work better in treating participants with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12V Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy involves taking white blood cells from a person, growing them in the lab, genetically modifying them, then giving them back to the person. This therapy is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12 V mTCR cells are safe and can shrink tumors. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old with cancer that has the KRAS G12V molecule on the surface of tumors. Design: In another protocol, participants will: Be screened Have cells harvested and grown Have leukapheresis In this protocol, participants will have the procedures below. Participants will be admitted to the hospital. Over 5 days, participants will get 2 chemotherapy medicines as an infusion via catheter in the upper chest. A few days later, participants will get the anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells via catheter. For up to 3 days, participants will get a drug to make the cells active. A day after getting the cells, participants will get a drug to increase their white blood cell count. This will be a shot or injection under the skin. Participants will recover in the hospital for 1-2 weeks. They will have lab and blood tests. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have visits every few months for 2 years, and then as determined by their doctor. Visits will be 1-2 days. They will include lab tests, imaging studies, and physical exam. Some visits may include leukapheresis or blood drawn. Participants will have blood collected over several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy with Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and hormone therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer. Specialized radiation therapy, such as IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Androgen hormones can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells and antihormone therapy drugs, such as leuprolide acetate, goserelin acetate, and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving IMRT with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and androgen deprivation therapy may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Using PSMA-PET / MRI to Guide Cyberknife-Delivered Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect of using PSMA-PET / MRI to guide cyberknife-delivered stereotactic body radiation therapy in favorable risk prostate cancer patients. Diagnostic procedures, such as PSMA-PET / MRI may help design the radiation treatment plan so that the entire prostate receives the prescribed dose of radiation and, in addition, the visible tumor as defined by the scans receives hot spots. Hot spots are areas that receive above the dose of prescription simply due to the nature of radiation therapy. The imaging techniques in this study help focus the hot spots on certain regions determined by the scans where the visible tumor is located as opposed to the current practice where hot spot regions are randomly located in the target area. PSMA-PET / MRI may help better guide stereotactic body radiotherapy and improve treatment outcomes for future patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov


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