Treatment Clinical Trials for Gastric (Stomach) Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for gastric (stomach) cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 126-150 of 153

  • Apatinib and Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Advanced Cancers

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of apatinib when given together with pembrolizumab in treating participants with cancers that have spread to other places in the body. Apatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving apatinib and pembrolizumab may work better at treating advanced cancers.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Pembrolizumab, Oxaliplatin, Capecitabine as First Line Treatment for Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Esophagus or Stomach Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work as first-line treatment in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine may work better in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Lenvatinib Mesylate and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well lenvatinib mesylate works with pembrolizumab in treating patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or has come back (recurrent). Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving lenvatinib mesylate and pembrolizumab may work better at treating at gastric or gastroesophageal cancer.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • A Study of DSP-7888 Dosing Emulsion in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase 1b / 2, open-label, multicenter study of DSP-7888 in combination with checkpoint inhibitors (nivolumab or pembrolizumab) in adult patients with solid tumors, that consists of 2 parts: dose search part of the study (Phase 1b) and the dose expansion part of the study (Phase 2). In Phase 1b of this study there will be 2 arms: Arm 1 and Arm 2. In Arm 1, there will be 6 to 12 patients who will be dosed with DSP-7888 and nivolumab and in Arm 2 there will be 6 to 12 patients who will be dosed with DSP-7888 and pembrolizumab. Once the recommended dose is determined in Phase 1b, platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (PROC) patients will be enrolled in Phase 2 of the study with DSP-7888, exploring the combination with pembrolizumab (Arm 2). In Phase 2, approximately 40 patients with PROC will be initially enrolled.
    Location: 4 locations

  • PEN-866 in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Protocol PEN-866-001 is an open-label, multi-center, first-in-human Phase 1 / 2a study evaluating PEN-866 in patients with advanced solid malignancies whose disease has progressed after treatment with previous anticancer therapies.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Study of Crenolanib With Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Esophagogastric Adenocarcinoma

    This is a single-arm phase I / Ib study of crenolanib combined with ramucirumab / paclitaxel as second line therapy for patients with advanced / metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, GEJ or stomach. Patients will be enrolled in two phases; dose escalation phase and dose expansion phase.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12V Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy involves taking white blood cells from a person, growing them in the lab, genetically modifying them, then giving them back to the person. This therapy is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12 V mTCR cells are safe and can shrink tumors. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old with cancer that has the KRAS G12V molecule on the surface of tumors. Design: In another protocol, participants will: Be screened Have cells harvested and grown Have leukapheresis In this protocol, participants will have the procedures below. Participants will be admitted to the hospital. Over 5 days, participants will get 2 chemotherapy medicines as an infusion via catheter in the upper chest. A few days later, participants will get the anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells via catheter. For up to 3 days, participants will get a drug to make the cells active. A day after getting the cells, participants will get a drug to increase their white blood cell count. This will be a shot or injection under the skin. Participants will recover in the hospital for 1-2 weeks. They will have lab and blood tests. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have visits every few months for 2 years, and then as determined by their doctor. Visits will be 1-2 days. They will include lab tests, imaging studies, and physical exam. Some visits may include leukapheresis or blood drawn. Participants will have blood collected over several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Chemotherapy with or without Radiation or Surgery in Treating Participants with Oligometastatic Esophageal or Gastric Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without radiation or surgery works in treating participants with esophageal or gastric cancer that has spread to less than 3 places in the body (oligometastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Surgery, such as complete surgical resection, may stop the spread of tumor cells by surgically removing organs or tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation or surgery may work better than chemotherapy alone in treating participants with oligometastatic esophageal or gastric cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ramucirumab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ramucirumab and irinotecan hydrochloride work in treating patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or to other parts of the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Irinotecan hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ramucirumab and irinotecan hydrochloride may be a better treatment for patients with metastatic or advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer With Positive Peritoneal Cytology

    Background: Gastric cancer is a common and serious cancer. Standard treatment is chemotherapy drugs. Researchers want to see if a new treatment helps. It is surgical removal of the cancer and heated chemotherapy delivered to the abdominal cavity called HIPEC. Objective: To test if surgical removal of tumors plus heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy can improve survival in people with gastric cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with gastric cancer who can have most tumors surgically removed Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scans - Tissue sample from previous surgery - Endoscopy with biopsy: A tube with a camera goes through the mouth and into the stomach. It and takes a sample of stomach tissue. Participants might may get medicine to make them drowsy. - Laparoscopy: Small cuts are made in the abdomen. A thin tube with a light and camera is inserted into the abdomen. Participants sleep through the procedure. Participants will stay in the hospital. They will have: - Surgery to remove as many tumors as possible. - HIPEC for 60 minutes: Two thin tubes are put into the abdomen. Two chemotherapy drugs are given through one tube. They are drained out through another at a temperature a few degrees above normal body temperature. Another drug is given in a vein. Recovery for 7-21 days: Participants will have tubes in their stomach and bladder and IVs for a few days. They will get pain medicine, IV fluids, antibiotics, and blood transfusions as needed. Participants will have visits every few months for 3 years, then one a year. Visits include physical exam, blood tests, and scans. They also include dietary assessment and questions.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study Evaluating MM-310 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    MM-310 is a liposomal formulation of a docetaxel prodrug that targets the EphA2 receptor on cancer cells. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapeutic drug.This study is a Phase 1 open-label study of MM-310 in patients with solid tumors. In the first part of the study, MM-310 will be assessed as a monotherapy until a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established. After an MTD of MM-310 as a monotherapy is established, an expansion cohort and MM-310 in combination with other therapies will be assessed.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab in treating patients with esophageal and gastric cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph node. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Safety and Efficacy of MAK683 in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this Phase I / II study is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and to evaluate the safety, antitumor activity and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of MAK683 in patients with advanced malignancies such as Diffuse Large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) or other advanced solid tumors for whom no further effective standard treatment is available.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Personalized Antibodies in Treating Patients with Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies personalized antibodies in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Testing tumor tissue for gene mutations and protein expression patterns and using drugs that target the specific profile of the tumor, may work better than standard chemotherapy in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    This is an open label, single arm phase 1 dose escalation study and phase 2 study of BBI608 in combination with paclitaxel in patients with advanced malignancies. Currently the study is only enrolling patients with thymic carcinoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of PF‑06940434 in Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors.

    Open-label, multi-center, non-randomized, multiple dose, safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamics and clinical activity study of PF-06940434 in patients with SCCHN (Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck), renal cell carcinoma (RCC - clear cell and papillary), ovarian, gastric, esophageal, esophageal (adeno and squamous), lung squamous cell, pancreatic and biliary duct, endometrial, melanoma and urothelial tumors. This study contains two parts, single agent dose escalation (Part 1A), dose finding of PF 06940434 in combination with anti-PD-1 (Part 1B), biopsy cohorts with monotherapy lead-in at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD), followed by combination of anti-PD-1 [PF-06801591] (Part 1C) followed by dose expansion (Part 2). Part 2 Dose Combination Expansion will enroll participants into 2 cohorts at doses determined from Part 1B in order to further evaluate the safety of PF-06940434 in combination with anti-PD-1.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Preliminary Efficacy of FP-1305 in Cancer Patients

    This is a first in human study to identify whether FP-1305 is suitable to use in humans. The previous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that FP-1305 binds to a receptor known as CLEVER-1. CLEVER-1 has been shown to support tumour growth. No significant adverse events were witnessed in primates and the dose used will be 300 fold lower than the dose provided to primates which showed no toxicity. The patients with advanced melanoma, uveal melanoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, ER+ breast, gastric, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal or liver cancer who have exhausted all licenced therapeutic options will die due to their disease. Based on the investigator's existing data CLEVER-1 is expressed in these tumour types. Inhibition of CLEVER-1 with FP-1305 may have an anti-tumour effect in these patients.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Study of Romiplostim for Chemo-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adults Subjects With Gastrointestinal or Colorectal Cancer

    Study of Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects with Gastrointestinal or Colorectal Cancer
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Capecitabine / Tesetaxel Versus Capecitabine / Placebo as Second-line Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    This study is being performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine in combination with tesetaxel versus capecitabine in combination with placebo as second-line treatment for patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of PSB205 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1, ascending dose escalation study of PSB205 in subjects with advanced solid tumors. The study will be conducted in 2 parts. Part 1 of the study will be a dose escalation evaluation to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to establish a recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of PSB205. This study purpose is to describe the safety and tolerability, to assess Pharmacokinetics (PK) and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess the anti-tumor activity of PSB205 in subjects with solid tumors. Part 2 of the study will further evaluate the RP2D in 3 distinct tumor cohorts of approximately 12 subjects each.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of AMG 910 in Subjects With CLDN18.2-Positive Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    To evaluate the safety and tolerability of AMG 910 in adult subjects, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D)
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • A First in Human Study of BAY2701439 to Look at Safety, How the Body Absorbs, Distributes and Excretes the Drug, and How Well the Drug Works in Participants With Advanced Cancer Expressing the HER2 Protein

    In this study, researchers want to learn about the safety of drug BAY2701439 and how well the drug works in patients with advanced cancer that has the protein HER2 (Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2) and cannot be cured by currently available treatment options. The study will include patients with HER2 expressing breast, gastric (stomach) or gastroesophageal (stomach and esophagus) cancer, as well as other cancers that have HER2. Researchers want to find the best dose of BAY2701439 for patients and look at the way the body absorbs, distributes and excretes the drug. The study drug is a type of therapy called a 'targeted alpha therapy' which uses an antibody to deliver a radioactive particle to cancer cells. BAY2701439 contains thorium-227 which emits radiation (a lot of energy that moves from one place to another with damaging effects). The thorium-227 in the drug is attached to an 'antibody' (large protein) that specifically binds to HER2 on the cancer cells and will emit its radiation in the form of alpha particles. The alpha particles are expected to damage the tumor cells and cause them to die, but spare surrounding tissue as alpha particles travel only very short distances in the body. This is the first study in humans for drug BAY2701439. Patients participating in this study will receive the drug by injection every 6 weeks a maximum 6 times. Observation after treatment last up to 3 years.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Futibatinib in Patients With Specific FGFR Aberrations

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of futibatinib in patients with FGFR aberrations in 3 distinct cohorts. Patients will be enrolled into one of 3 cohorts: patients with advanced, metastatic or locally-advanced solid tumors harboring FGFR1-4 rearrangements (excluding primary brain tumors and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma [iCCA]); patients with gastric or gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer harboring FGFR2 amplification; and patients with myeloid or lymphoid neoplasms with FGFR1 rearrangements.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • MM-398 and Ramucirumab in Treating Patients with Gastric Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of MM-398 and ramucirumab in treating patients with gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. MM-398 contains a chemotherapy drug called irinotecan, which in its active form interrupts cell reproduction. MM-398 builds irinotecan into a container called a liposome which may be able to release the medicine slowly over time to reduce side effects and increase its ability to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving MM-398 and ramucirumab together may work better in treating patients with gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California