Treatment Clinical Trials for Gastric (Stomach) Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for gastric (stomach) cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 126-144 of 144
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  • Safety and Efficacy of MAK683 in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this Phase I / II study is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and to evaluate the safety, antitumor activity and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of MAK683 in patients with advanced malignancies such as Diffuse Large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) or other advanced solid tumors for whom no further effective standard treatment is available.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • CD8+ T Cell Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Gastrointestinal Tumors

    This phase I pilot trial studies the side effects of cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8)+ T cells in treating patients with gastrointestinal tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Tumor cells and blood are used to help create an adoptive T cell therapy, such as CD8+ T cell therapy, that is individually designed for a patient and may help doctors learn more about genetic changes in the tumor. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving CD8+ T cell therapy and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with gastrointestinal tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of BGB-A317 in Combination With BGB-290 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of the Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody BGB-A317 in Combination With the PARP Inhibitor BGB-290 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors
    Location: 4 locations

  • Mogamulizumab in Treating Patients with Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the safety and best dose of mogamulizumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as mogamulizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells that express C-C chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4).
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Personalized Antibodies in Treating Patients with Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies personalized antibodies in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Testing tumor tissue for gene mutations and protein expression patterns and using drugs that target the specific profile of the tumor, may work better than standard chemotherapy in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Evaluation of SAR408701 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Primary Objectives: - To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of SAR408701 administered as monotherapy, once every 2 weeks (with and without a loading dose at Cycle 1) to patients with advanced solid tumors (Main Escalation and Loading Dose Escalation Q2W). - To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of SAR408701 administered as monotherapy, once every 3 weeks to patients with advanced solid tumors (Escalation Q3W Cycle). - To assess efficacy according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) (Expansion Phase) when SAR408701 is administered once every 2 weeks with or without a loading dose at Cycle 1. Secondary Objectives: - To characterize the overall safety profile of SAR408701. - To characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of SAR408701 and of its potential circulating derivatives. - To identify the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of SAR408701. - To assess the potential immunogenicity of SAR408701.
    Location: 2 locations

  • KN026 in Patients With HER2 Expressing Breast Cancer and Gastric Cancer

    This is an open-label, phase 1 dose-escalation study of KN026 in subjects with HER2 positive advanced breast and Gastric Cancer. The standard "3 + 3" design was used for dose escalation. There are 3 proposed dose levels which are 10, 15, and 20 mg / kg, but dosing interval may be adjusted during the study (such as QW, OR Q2W, OR Q3W) based on emerging data from this trial and / or from phase 1 trial of KN026 in other country. Dose escalation will continue until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is reached or if MTD is not found, dose escalation will continue until the MAD of 20 mg / kg is reached.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose and preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Mismatch-Repair Deficient and Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Gastric Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works with capecitabine and radiation therapy in treating patients with mismatch repair deficient and Epstein-Barr virus positive gastric cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving pembrolizumab, capecitabine and radiation therapy may work better at treating gastric cancer.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Capecitabine / Tesetaxel Versus Capecitabine / Placebo as Second-line Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    This study is being performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine in combination with tesetaxel versus capecitabine in combination with placebo as second-line treatment for patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study to Test How Well Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors Respond to Treatment With the ATR Inhibitor BAY1895344 in Combination With Pembrolizumab, to Find the Optimal Dose for Patients, How the Drug is Tolerated and the Way the Body Absorbs, Distributes and Discharges the Drug

    The purpose of the study is to test how well patients with advanced solid tumors respond to treatment with BAY1895344 in combination with pembrolizumab. In addition researchers want to find for patients the optimal dose of BAY1895344 in combination with pembrolizumab, how the drug is tolerated and the way the body absorbs, distributes and discharges the drug. The study medication, BAY1895344, works by blocking a substance (ATR Kinase) which is produced by the body and is important for the growth of tumor cells. Pembrolizumab is an immunologic checkpoint blocker that promotes an immune response against the tumor.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study of NGM120 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors and Pancreatic Cancer Using Combination Therapy

    Study of NGM120 in subjects with advanced solid tumors and pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Nous-209 Genetic Vaccine for the Treatment of Microsatellite Unstable Solid Tumors

    NOUS-209 is a multicenter, open-label, multiple cohorts, First In Humans (FIH) clinical study, designed to evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity, and to detect any preliminary evidence of anti-tumor activity of Nous-209 genetic polyvalent vaccine based on a heterologous prime / boost regimen composed of the GAd20-209-FSP used for priming and MVA-209-FSP used for boosting in patients with Microsatellite Instability High (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC), gastric, gastro-esophageal junction (G-E junction) and endometrial tumors.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Paclitaxel Chemotherapy With Oral Capecitabine for Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    Background: Three-fourths of people diagnosed with gastric cancer will die from it. Researchers want to see if giving cancer drugs in a new way can help people live longer and delay the time it takes for the cancer to grow. Objective: To find a better way to treat advanced stomach cancer. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with stomach cancer that has spread throughout their belly. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Scans Cancer sample: If they do not have one, they will have a biopsy. Tests of performance of normal activities Dietary assessment Participants will have a laparoscopy. Small cuts are made into their abdomen. A thin camera with a light is inserted. Small instruments are used to take biopsies. This will be repeated during the study to monitor the cancer. During the first laparoscopy, a port with a catheter attached will be put into the abdomen. Participants may also have an endoscopy: A thin tube with a camera is inserted through the mouth and into the stomach. The tube collects samples to monitor the cancer. Participants will get paclitaxel every 3 weeks through the abdominal port and through a small plastic tube in an arm vein. They will also take capecitabine by mouth twice daily for the first 15 days of a 21-day cycle. After participants finish 3 cycles, they will have scans to see how they are doing. They may get another course of therapy. Participants will have visits every 3 weeks during treatment. Then they will have follow-up visits for 5 years. Then they will keep in touch with researchers for the rest of their life.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study of PSB205 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1, ascending dose escalation study of PSB205 in subjects with advanced solid tumors. The study will be conducted in 2 parts. Part 1 of the study will be a dose escalation evaluation to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to establish a recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of PSB205. This study purpose is to describe the safety and tolerability, to assess Pharmacokinetics (PK) and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess the anti-tumor activity of PSB205 in subjects with solid tumors. Part 2 of the study will further evaluate the RP2D in 3 distinct tumor cohorts of approximately 12 subjects each.
    Location: 2 locations

  • MM-398 and Ramucirumab in Treating Patients with Gastric Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of MM-398 and ramucirumab in treating patients with gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. MM-398 contains a chemotherapy drug called irinotecan, which in its active form interrupts cell reproduction. MM-398 builds irinotecan into a container called a liposome which may be able to release the medicine slowly over time to reduce side effects and increase its ability to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving MM-398 and ramucirumab together may work better in treating patients with gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Study of Romiplostim for Chemo-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adults Subjects With Gastrointestinal or Colorectal Cancer

    Study of Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects with Gastrointestinal or Colorectal Cancer
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Sonidegib and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of sonidegib when given together with pembrolizumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with solid tumor that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Sonidegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sonidegib and pembrolizumab may work better than standard treatment in treating patients with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 3 locations


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