Clinical Trials Using Atezolizumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Atezolizumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 128

  • A Study Of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations In Participants With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (Morpheus- Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two cohorts will be enrolled in parallel in this study: the first-line (1L) cohort will consist of patients who have not received any systemic therapy for their disease and the second-line (2L) cohort will consist of patients who progressed during or after receiving a platinum-containing regimen and a PD-L1 / PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor treatment. In each cohort, eligible patients will be assigned to one of several treatment arms.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Cancer following Adoptive Cell Transfer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab in treating patients with cancer following adoptive cell transfer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Non-metastatic Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the best dose of atezolizumab and how well it works in treating patients with bladder cancer that has not spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Patients With Advanced Liver Cancers (Morpheus-Liver)

    This is a Phase Ib / II, open-label, multicenter, randomized umbrella study in participants with advanced liver cancers. The study is designed with the flexibility to open new treatment arms as new treatments become available, close existing treatment arms that demonstrate minimal clinical activity or unacceptable toxicity, modify the participant population, or introduce additional cohorts of participants with other types of advanced primary liver cancer. Cohort 1 will enroll participants with locally advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have not received prior systemic therapy for their disease. Eligible participants will initially be randomly assigned to one of several treatment arms (Stage 1). Participants who experience loss of clinical benefit or unacceptable toxicity during Stage 1 may be eligible to receive treatment with a different treatment combination (Stage 2). When a Stage 2 treatment combination is available, this will be introduced by amending the protocol.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • First-in-human Study of DRP-104 as Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors.

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and preliminary antitumor activity of DRP-104 administered via intravenous infusion as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors and to assess preliminary safety and efficacy in two expansions of patients, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with defined genetic mutations and advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Stage IB-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial estimates how many patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer have measurable circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) in their blood at baseline and unmeasurable ctDNA after receiving 1 year of chemotherapy and atezolizumab. ctDNA is genetic material in the bloodstream that comes from the tumor and is a possible marker of lung cancer returning. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, pemetrexed, and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Adding atezolizumab to combination chemotherapy may help kill any remaining cancer cells in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Intermittent Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well intermittent checkpoint inhibitor therapy works in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Checkpoint inhibitors, such as pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, nivolumab, and avelumab, are drugs that work by helping the immune system recognize and kill cancer cells. This study is being done to find out whether intermittent checkpoint inhibitor therapy works the same, better, or worse than continued checkpoint inhibitor therapy in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • An Open-Label Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate XmAb24306 as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and activity of XmAb24306 alone or in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor treatment in participants with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Cobimetinib, Atezolizumab, and Hydroxychloroquine for the Treatment of Metastatic or Unresectable KRAS-Mutated Malignancies, MEKiAUTO Study

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of cobimetinib and how well it works when given together with atezolizumab and hydroxychloroquine in treating patients with KRAS-mutated cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Cobimetinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Hydroxychloroquine is used to decrease the body's immune response and may improve bone marrow function. Giving cobimetinib, atezolizumab, and hydroxychloroquine may work better in treating patients with metastatic or unresectable cancer compared to cobimetinib and atezolizumab alone.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • D2C7-IT and Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of D2C7-immunotoxin (IT) when given together with atezolizumab in treating patients with glioblastoma that has come back (recurrent). An immunotoxin is a human-made protein that consists of a targeting portion linked to a toxin. The toxin is based on a portion of a common bacteria that the immune system cells will recognize. D2C7-IT is engineered to recognize two receptors, epidermal growth factor wild type (EGFRwt) and epidermal growth factor variant type III (EGFR-vIII). These receptors are expressed in many glioblastoma cells. Atezolizumab is a monoclonal antibody that unblocks “checkpoint” proteins that interfere with the immune system attacking tumor cells. Combining D2C7-IT with a checkpoint inhibitor, such as atezolizumab, may be effective against glioblastoma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Comparing Length of Treatment with Immunotherapy in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase III trial compares 1 year immunotherapy treatment versus continuous immunotherapy treatment beyond 1 year in patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy such as pembrolizumab, nivolumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab are drugs given through a vein to the entire body to activate the immune system. Comparing the treatment lengths may help doctors determine the ideal length of time for treatment with immunotherapy in patients with solid tumors.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Preliminary Efficacy Trial of BNT411

    This first-in-human (FIH) trial aims to establish a safe dose of BNT411 as a monotherapy and in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide. BNT411 is a TLR7 agonist which is expected to mount broad innate and adaptive immune reactions, especially in combination with cytotoxic therapies and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Immunotherapy (Atezolizumab and Varlilumab) in Combination with Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced Unresectable Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab, varlilumab, and radiation therapy in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as atezolizumab may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as varlilumab may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving atezolizumab, varlilumab, and radiation therapy may increase the amount of time the disease is not active or does not spread to another part of the body.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Derazantinib and Atezolizumab in Patients With Urothelial Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate efficacy of derazantinib single-agent or derazantinib-atezolizumab in combination in patients with advanced urothelial cancer harboring fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) genetic aberrations (GA) of various clinical stages of disease progression and prior treatments.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Immunotherapy (Atezolizumab) and Vaccines (MVA-BN-Brachyury and PROSTVAC) for the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk and High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer, the AtezoVax Study

    This trial studies how well atezolizumab, MVA-BN-brachyury and PROSTVAC work for the treatment of intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PROSTVAC includes the use of two doses; a prime vaccine, PROSTVAC-V (the first vaccine may generate a response from the immune system) and a boost vaccine, PROSTVAC-F (the second vaccine may increase and maintain the response of the immune system). The MVA-BN-brachyury vaccine used with the PROSTVAC vaccine may start an immune response in the tumor. An ‘immune response’ is the process of the body detecting and attacking foreign bodies such as cancer cells. Immune responses are effective in killing some forms of cancer. Giving atezolizumab, MVA-BN-brachyury and PROSTVAC may work better than MVA-BN-brachyury and PROSTVAC alone.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Atezolizumab with or without PEGPH20 before and after Surgery for the Treatment of Stage I-II Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab with or without PEGPH20 given before and after surgery works in treating patients with stage I-II pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PEGPH20 may stop the growth of tumor cells by breaking down hyaluronan, a tissue component needed for cell growth. Giving atezolizumab with PEGPH20 before and after surgery may increase immune response compared to atezolizumab alone.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Ipatasertib in Combination with Carboplatin, Carboplatin / Paclitaxel, or Capecitabine / Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies best dose of ipatasertib and how well it works with carboplatin with or without paclitaxel in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Ipatasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving ipatasertib in combination with carboplatin, carboplatin / paclitaxel, or capecitabine / atezolizumab will work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Safety and Efficacy of KY1044 and Atezolizumab in Advanced Cancer

    A Phase 1 / 2, open label, multi-center study to evaluate the safety, efficacy and tolerability of KY1044 as single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1 (atezolizumab) in adult patients with selected advanced malignancies, who are ineligible for or there are no available therapies known to confer a clinical benefit for their disease, or they have exhausted all such available options in each indication and therefore will be patients for whom a clinical trial is appropriate.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Atezolizumab with or without Tocilizumab in Treating Men with Localized Prostate Cancer before Radical Prostatectomy

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works alone or in combination with tocilizumab in treating men with localized prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Tocilizumab is an antibody (a protein similar to those produced by the body's immune system) that binds to a protein called IL-6R. High levels of IL-6 may promote tumor growth. Blocking IL-6R with tocilizumab may reset the immune system to recognize the tumor and help shrink it. We want to see how effective atezolizumab and tocilizumab are when used together for people with advanced local prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients with Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well atezolizumab in combination with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil works in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, oxaliplatin, and fluorouracil may work better in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Atezolizumab with or without Tocilizumab or Other Immune Modulating-Agents in Treating Patients with Stage III or IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works in treating patients with stage III or IV head and neck squamous cell cancer, and if adding atezolizumab to the standard-of-care treatment (surgical resection followed by radiation or chemoradiation) decreases the occurrence of cancer relapse. Atezolizumab is an antibody (a protein used by the body's immune system to identify and neutralize foreign substances such as bacteria, viruses, and tumor cells) that affects the immune system by blocking the PD-L1 pathway. The PD L1 pathway is involved in decreasing the body’s natural immune response to fight cancer. By blocking the PD-L1 pathway, atezolizumab may help your immune system stop or reverse the growth of tumors. Tocilizumab is an antibody (a protein similar to those produced by the body's immune system) that binds to a protein called IL-6R. High levels of IL-6 may promote tumor growth. Blocking IL-6R with tocilizumab may reset the immune system to recognize the tumor and help shrink it. The body’s immune system has a certain natural ability to withstand tumor growth. Tumors partially resist the immune system and atezolizumab may help your immune system to withstand the growth of tumors. Giving atezolizumab in combination with tocilizumab may have additional immune effects against tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of atezolizumab or atezolizumab in combination with tocilizumab on infiltration of the tumor by T-cells (a type of white blood cell).
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • The EndoBARR Trial (Endometrial Bevacizumab, Atezolizumab, Rucaparib)

    To demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the combination of rucaparib, bevacizumab and atezolizumab in recurrent, progressive endometrial carcinoma.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Ramucirumab and Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ramucirumab and atezolizumab work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab and atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Platinum Chemotherapy Plus Paclitaxel With Bevacizumab and Atezolizumab in Metastatic Carcinoma of the Cervix

    The study will integrate the efficacy of combining the anti programmed death-ligand 1 (anti-PD-L1) agent atezolizumab with the current standard of care in Stage IVB , persistent or recurrent carcinoma of the cervix, namely cisplatin / paclitaxel / bevacizumab. It will be explored the combination of bevacizumab plus atezolizumab, with no patient selection based on PD-L1 expression, allowing an all-comer assessment of atezolizumab activity. The study is a randomized open label phase III trial to investigate the impact of atezolizumab in combination with bevacizumab and cisplatin / paclitaxel chemotherapy on overall survival and will employ the intent to treat principle, and random assignment to one of the 2 arms will be balanced according to disease histology (squamous versus adenocarcinoma), prior platinum therapy as a radiation sensitizer (no prior cis-Radiotherapy (RT) versus prior cis-RT) and chemotherapy backbone (cisplatin versus carboplatin). This trial will be run in an open label design due to the following considerations: the control arm is the standard of care for women diagnosed with metastatic, persistant or recurrent cervical cancer because of its impact on overall survival and the primary endpoint of the study is overall survival (OS), so blinding is not needed to ensure a robust assessment.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Safety and Efficacy of p53 Gene Therapy Combined With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Solid Tumors.

    This is a single arm Phase 2 study of the combination of adenoviral p53 (Ad-p53) gene therapy administered intra-tumorally with approved immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with recurrent or metastatic cancers. Comparison will be made to historical data. General safety and efficacy using RECIST 1.1 and Immune-Related Response Criteria as well as ECOG performance will be utilized.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois