Clinical Trials Using Capecitabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Capecitabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-71 of 71

  • Preoperative Radiotherapy and E7046 in Rectum Cancer

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1b study in participants with locally advanced rectum cancer where primary resection without chemoradiotherapy is unlikely to achieve clear margins as defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is conducted to assess the safety, to assess the tolerability, and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of E7046 in combination with pre-operative chemoradiotherapy. The study will also assess the efficacy of the combination in the expansion part at RP2D.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Pembrolizumab, a Monoclonal Antibody Against PD-1, in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in People With Advanced Biliary Tract Carcinoma (BTC)

    Background: Biliary tract cancers are rare but they are serious. Researchers want to see if a certain drug helps the immune system fight cancer cells. The drug is called pembrolizumab. It may work even better with two chemotherapy drugs that are widely used to treat gastrointestinal cancers. Objective: To study if pembrolizumab given with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) increases the time it takes for a person's biliary tract cancer to get worse. Eligibility: People age 18 and older with previously treated biliary tract cancer that has spread to other parts of the body Design: Participants will be screened with tests as part of their regular cancer care. Each study cycle is 3 weeks. For 6 cycles, participants will: Get pembrolizumab and oxaliplatin on day 1 of each cycle. They will be given in an intravenous (IV) catheter. Take capecitabine by mouth for 2 weeks then have 1 week without it. Participants will complete a patient diary. Starting with cycle 7, participants will get only pembrolizumab. They will get it once every 3 weeks. On day 1 of every cycle, participants will have: Physical exam Review of symptoms and how well they do normal activities Blood tests Every 9 weeks, they will have a scan. Participants may have tumor samples taken. Participants will have a final visit about 1 month after they stop the study drug. After that, they will be contacted by phone or email yearly.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil or Capecitabine with or without Zoledronic Acid in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy and fluorouracil or capecitabine with or without zoledronic acid work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Zoledronic acid is used in cancer patients to reduce cancer symptoms and may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation. Giving hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy and fluorouracil or capecitabine with or without zoledronic acid may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Capecitabine, Lenvatinib Mesylate, and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer before Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of capecitabine when given together with lenvatinib mesylate and external beam radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving capecitabine, lenvatinib mesylate, and external beam radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Glutaminase Inhibitor CB-839 and Capecitabine in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 and capecitabine and to see how well they work in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or colorectal cancer. Glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Capecitabine may kill tumor cells by inhibiting deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid synthesis. Giving glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 and capecitabine together may work better in treating patients with solid tumors or colorectal cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Safety and Efficacy of Intra-Arterial and Intra-Tumoral Ad-p53 With Capecitabine (Xeloda) or Anti-PD-1 in Liver Metastases of Solid Tumors and Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This is a Phase 1 / 2 study of the combination of Ad-p53 administered intra-arterially in combination with oral metronomic capecitabine or pembrolizumab in patients with unresectable, refractory liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and other solid tumors, including primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A third arm will study the intra-tumoral injection of Ad-p53 combined with nivolumab infusions in recurrent head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). This safety study has a standard 3+3 design for arms A and B; .HNSCC will be placed in a single dosing cohort. The Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) will be determined as well for intra-arterial infusions, and the entire study will determine the general efficacy using RECIST 1.1 and Immune-Related Response Criteria. Safety will be followed using the CTCAE listings for adverse events.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Low-Dose Capecitabine and Bevacizumab in Targeting Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells and Treating Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma

    This phase 0 / I trial studies how well continuous low-dose capecitabine given alone and with bevacizumab works in targeting myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in patients with glioblastoma that has either returned after being treated by a previous therapy or has continued to progress despite being treated. MDSCs are a group of immune cells found in the tissue and blood that may reduce the ability of the immune system to fight tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumors cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving a continuous low dose of capecitabine, with and without bevacizumab, may help reduce the number of MDSCs found in the tumor and be a better treatment for patients with glioblastoma.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Afatinib Dimaleate and Capecitabine in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer or Biliary Cancer

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of afatinib dimaleate when given together with capecitabine in treating patients with solid tumors, pancreatic cancer, or biliary cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment and has not responded to previous treatment. Afatinib dimaleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving afatinib dimaleate together with capecitabine may be a better treatment for solid tumors, pancreatic cancer, or biliary cancer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Biweekly Intraperitoneal Oxaliplatin with Systemic Capecitabine and Bevacizumab for Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Appendiceal or Colorectal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of oxaliplatin when given together with capecitabine and bevacizumab in treating patients with peritoneal cancer from previously treated cancer of the colon, rectum, or appendix. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Infusing oxaliplatin directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells while reducing side effects. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth by stopping the formation of blood vessels that feed them. Giving oxaliplatin directly into the abdomen, in addition to treatment with and capecitabine and bevacizumab may be effective in patients with peritoneal cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • NEO: Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Excision and Observation for Early Rectal Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to find out the effects of chemotherapy followed by less invasive surgery on patients and their early rectal cancer. The approach of this trial will be considered a success if at least 65% of participants are able to keep the rectum.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • Capecitabine / Tesetaxel Versus Capecitabine / Placebo as Second-line Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    This study is being performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine in combination with tesetaxel versus capecitabine in combination with placebo as second-line treatment for patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • An Open-Label Study to Enable Continued Treatment Access for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Studies of Ruxolitinib

    The purpose of this study is to provide continued supply of ruxolitinib alone, ruxolitinib plus background cancer therapy, or background cancer therapy alone to subjects from an Incyte-sponsored study of ruxolitinib that has reached its study objectives or has been terminated. This study will also provide another mechanism for reporting adverse events related to study drug safety.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • ANG1005 in Leptomeningeal Disease From Breast Cancer

    This is an open-label Phase 3 study to see if ANG1005 can prolong survival compared to a Physician Best Choice control in HER2-negative breast cancer patients with newly diagnosed leptomeningeal disease and previously treated brain metastases.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Paclitaxel Chemotherapy With Oral Capecitabine for Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    Background: Three-fourths of people diagnosed with gastric cancer will die from it. Researchers want to see if giving cancer drugs in a new way can help people live longer and delay the time it takes for the cancer to grow. Objective: To find a better way to treat advanced stomach cancer. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with stomach cancer that has spread throughout their belly. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Scans Cancer sample: If they do not have one, they will have a biopsy. Tests of performance of normal activities Dietary assessment Participants will have a laparoscopy. Small cuts are made into their abdomen. A thin camera with a light is inserted. Small instruments are used to take biopsies. This will be repeated during the study to monitor the cancer. During the first laparoscopy, a port with a catheter attached will be put into the abdomen. Participants may also have an endoscopy: A thin tube with a camera is inserted through the mouth and into the stomach. The tube collects samples to monitor the cancer. Participants will get paclitaxel every 3 weeks through the abdominal port and through a small plastic tube in an arm vein. They will also take capecitabine by mouth twice daily for the first 15 days of a 21-day cycle. After participants finish 3 cycles, they will have scans to see how they are doing. They may get another course of therapy. Participants will have visits every 3 weeks during treatment. Then they will have follow-up visits for 5 years. Then they will keep in touch with researchers for the rest of their life.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Capecitabine and Radiation Therapy after Surgery in Treating Patients with Non-Metastatic Invasive Breast cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well capecitabine and radiation therapy after surgery work in treating patients with invasive breast cancer that has not spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving capecitabine and radiation therapy together may kill more tumor cells in patients with invasive breast cancer compared to capecitabine or radiation therapy alone.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-IIIB Rectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well patients with stage I-IIIB rectal cancer respond to a short course of radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy may prevent patients from needing surgery, could delay their need for surgery, or may mean that they need less drastic surgery and could potentially avoid a permanent ostomy (a surgically created connection between the intestine and the abdominal wall that allows for elimination of stool).
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Standard of Care Alone or in Combination With Ad-CEA Vaccine and Avelumab in People With Previously Untreated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer QUILT-2.004

    Background: Colorectal cancer is a common cancer in the U.S. It causes the second most cancer-related deaths. The drug avelumab and vaccine Ad-CEA together help the immune system fight cancer. Objective: To test if avelumab and Ad-CEA plus standard therapy treats colorectal cancer that has spread to other sites better than standard therapy alone. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with untreated colorectal cancer that has spread in the body Design: Participants will be screened with: Test to see if their cancer has a certain deficiency Blood, urine, and heart tests Scans Medical history Physical exam Tumor sample. This can be from a previous procedure. A small group of participants will get Ad-CEA and avelumab plus standard therapy. This is FOLFOX plus bevacizumab for up to 24 weeks then capecitabine plus bevacizumab. The others will have treatment in 2-week cycles. They will be Arm A or B: Arm A: FOLFOX and bevacizumab by IV days 1 and 2 for 12 cycles. After that, capecitabine by mouth twice a day and bevacizumab by IV on day 1. Arm B: Ad-CEA injection every 2-12 weeks. Avelumab by IV on day 1 of each cycle. FOLFOX and bevacizumab by IV days 2 and 3 for 12 cycles. Then, capecitabine by mouth twice a day and bevacizumab through IV on day 2. Participants will repeat screening tests during the study. Participants will be treated until their disease gets worse or they have bad side effects. Arm A participants can join Arm B. They will have a visit 4 5 weeks after they stop therapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Chemotherapy before and after Surgery in Treating Patients with Resectable Gallbladder Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy before and after surgery works in treating patients with gallbladder cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before and after surgery may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Molecular Profile of Breast Cancer in Ugandan Patients with Stage IIB-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trials studies the molecular profile of breast cancer in Ugandan patients with stage IIB-III breast cancer. Creating a molecular profile of breast cancer my help doctors learn more about biological factors associated with breast cancer in Ugandan patients with as well as measure the benefits of locally available diagnostic studies and the possibility of providing treatment via oral medication.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Veliparib, Pembrolizumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 621 locations

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine before Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of stereotactic body radiation therapy when given together with capecitabine before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and capecitabine before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin