Clinical Trials Using Cyclophosphamide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cyclophosphamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 351-375 of 397

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant with Treosulfan, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation for the Treatment of Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor stem cell transplant, treosulfan, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation work in treating patients with blood cancers (hematological malignancies). Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Cord Blood Transplant with OTS for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using OTS and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. OTS consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with OTS may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Modified Immune Cells (CD19 / CD20 CAR-T Cells) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CD19 / CD20 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how effective they are in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). In CAR-T cell therapy, a patient's white blood cells (T cells) are changed in the laboratory to produce an engineered receptor that allows the T cell to recognize and respond to CD19 and CD20 proteins. CD19 and CD20 are commonly found on non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Chemotherapy drugs such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide can control cancer cells by killing them, by preventing their growth, or by stopping them from spreading. Combining CD19 / CD20 CAR-T cells and chemotherapy may help treat patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • A Study of Combination Chemotherapy for Patients with Newly Diagnosed DAWT and Relapsed FHWT

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV diffuse anaplastic Wilms tumors (DAWT) or favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWT) that have come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy regimens such as UH-3 (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan) and ICE / Cyclo / Topo (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, and topotecan) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial may help doctors find out what effects, good and / or bad, regimen UH-3 has on patients with newly diagnosed DAWT and standard risk relapsed FHWT (those treated with only 2 drugs for the initial WT)and regimen ICE / Cyclo / Topo has on patients with high and very high risk relapsed FHWT (those treated with 3 or more drugs for the initial WT).
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Anakinra for the Reduction of CAR-T Toxicity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of anakinra and to see how well it works in reducing side effects (toxicity) associated with a CAR-T cell treatment called axicabtagene ciloleucel in patients with large B-cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Anakinra is a drug typically used to treat rheumatoid arthritis but may also help in reducing CAR-T cell therapy toxicity. Giving anakinra in combination with axicabtagene ciloleucel may help control relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Breast Cancer Vaccine (SV-BR-1-GM) in Combination with Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of a breast cancer vaccine (SV-BR-1-GM) and how well it works in combination with pembrolizumab for the treatment of breast cancer that is persistent, has come back (recurrent), or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Breast cancer vaccine SV-BR-1-GM is a human breast cancer cell line that has been genetically engineered to produce a substance called “GM-CSF” (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor) which occurs naturally in the body. GM-CSF is normally produced by white blood cells and helps the body develop immunity to disease-causing germs. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as pembrolizumab may help the body's immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Anti-cancer drugs such as cyclophosphamide may help boost the immune response. Interferon alpha 2b may help stimulate the immune system to fight cancer. This trial may help doctors see whether SV-BR-1-GM injections help boost the immune system and / or help control or help shrink breast cancer along with the other drugs that also boost the immune system.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Ruxolitinib for the Treatment of Graft Versus Host Disease Following Stem Cell Transplant in Patients with Primary and Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation works in preventing graft versus host disease and improving transplant outcomes in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only treatment with proven curative potential for myelofibrosis, however, myelofibrosis patients have a high risk for developing graft versus host disease post-transplant. Graft versus host disease is a condition where the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells. Ruxolitinib, a janus-associated kinase (JAK) inhibitor, is known to decrease inflammatory signals, which may reduce spleen size and decrease symptoms such as night sweats and weight loss. Administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after transplant may decrease the incidence and severity of graft versus host disease, increase survival, and improve quality of life in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation as Conditioning Regimen before Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well total marrow and lymphoid irradiation works as a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia. Total body irradiation can lower the relapse rate but has some fatal side effects such as irreversible damage to normal internal organs and graft-versus-host disease (a complication after transplantation in which donor's immune cells recognize the host as foreign and attack the recipient's tissues). Total body irradiation is a form of radiotherapy that involves irradiating the patient's entire body in an attempt to suppress the immune system, prevent rejection of the transplanted bone marrow and / or stem cells and to wipe out any remaining cancer cells. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more recently developed method of delivering radiation. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation is a method of using IMRT to direct radiation to the bone marrow. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation may allow a greater dose of radiation to be delivered to the bone marrow as a preparative regimen before hematopoietic cell transplant while causing less side effects to normal organs than standard total body irradiation.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • UCD19 CAR T Cells for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects of UCD19 CAR T cells work in treating patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). CAR T cells are immune cells used to fight infections and in some cases, can also kill cancer cells. During this study, some T cells are removed from the blood, and modified in the laboratory before being given back by intravenous injection. UCD19 CAR T cells is a new investigational gene that allows the T cells to then recognize and attempt to kill the lymphoma cells, and allow these modified cells to multiply and increase in numbers. Using UCD19 CAR T cells may work better in treating B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma compared to standard treatment.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy before Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Relapsed Aggressive B-cell or T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well vorinostat and combination chemotherapy before donor stem cell transplantation work in treating patients with aggressive B-cell or T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed). Vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, gemcitabine, and clofarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving vorinostat together with combination chemotherapy before donor stem cell transplantation may help to control lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Reduce Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen after donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and daratumumab after donor stem cell transplant may improve survival and reduce the risk of multiple myeloma coming back.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Genetically Engineered Cells (CD22-CAR T Cells) for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory B Cell Malignancies

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and how well cell therapy (CD22-CAR T cells) works for the treatment of B cell malignancies that have come back (recurrent) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). The antigen CD22 is commonly found on B cell cancers. In this study, a CD22 gene and a type of virus (lentivirus; a virus similar to HIV) are used in making the cells (CD22-CAR T cells). The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells can recognize and respond to a specific molecule, such as CD22 protein. This uses a portion of an antibody to CD22 and part of a molecule that activates or ‘turns on’ the immune cell. Together, the CAR may help these T cells find the cancer in the body. Giving chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide) before CD22-CAR T cells may help prepare the immune system to accept the CD22-CAR T cells.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Modified Immune Cells (AFM13-NK) and A Monoclonal Antibody (AFM13) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory CD30 Positive Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified umbilical cord blood immune cells (natural killer [NK] cells) combined with the antibody AFM13 (AFM13-NK) and AFM13 alone in treating patients with CD30 positive Hodgkin lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as AFM13, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving AFM13 loaded with NK cells followed by AFM13 alone may kill more cancer cells and decrease cancer growth in patients with CD30 positive AFM13-NK Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Modified Immune Cells (CD19-CD22 CAR T cells) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive, CD22 Positive Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified immune cells called CD19-CD22 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells in treating patients with CD19 positive(+), CD22+ B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). T-cells are collected from the patient and genetic materials called “chimeric antigen receptors (CAR)” are transferred to the collected T-cells. The CAR T-cells are then infused back to the patient's body. Giving CD19- CD22 CAR T cells after chemotherapy may help to control the disease.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • An Investigational Graft Processing Procedure (ApoGraft) for the Prevention of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of an investigational graft processing procedure (ApoGraft) in preventing acute graft versus host disease in patients undergoing a stem cell transplant. A stem cell is a type of cell found in the blood or bone marrow which helps form more blood cells. The purpose of a stem cell transplant is to use the stem cells from a healthy donor to replace the diseased bone marrow in the recipient. One of the side effects of a stem cell transplant is the development of graft versus host disease (GVHD). GVHD occurs when some of the cells from the donor attack the recipient’s tissues, resulting in mild, moderate, or even life-threatening side effects to the recipient’s skin, stomach, intestine, and liver. A haploidentical (half-matched related) stem cell transplant is a type of transplant that occurs when the person who needs a transplant can’t find a donor who exactly matches their tissue type (either among family members or through a matched unrelated donor). When no matched donor is available, haploidentical donors may be used. The purpose of this study is to see how well using ApoGraft in processing stem cells works to prevent or lessen the effects of GVHD while still effectively treating the disease in patients receiving a haploidentical stem cell transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Split-Dose R-CHOP for Older Adults with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (split-dose rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin hydrochloride [doxorubicin], vincristine [Oncovin], prednisone [R-CHOP]) works in treating older patients with stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Rituximab (R) is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide (C), doxorubicin (H), and vincristine (O), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone (P) lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving R at the typical dose and CHOP in a split-dose may reduce side effects and interactions with other medications or medical conditions, thereby making it easier for older patients with DLBCL to tolerate.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Comparing ATG or Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide to Calcineurin Inhibitor-Methotrexate as GVHD Prophylaxis after Myeloablative Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies how well 3 different drug combinations prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD) after donor stem cell transplant. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, may stop the activity of donor cells that can cause GVHD. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, may also stop the donor cells that can lead to GVHD while not affecting the cancer-fighting donor cells. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), is used to decrease the body's immune response and reduces the risk of GVHD. It is not yet known which combination of drugs: 1) ATG, methotrexate, and calcineurin inhibitor 2) cyclophosphamide and calcineurin inhibitor, or 3) methotrexate and calcineurin inhibitor may work best to prevent graft versus host disease and result in best overall outcome after donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Genetically Engineered Immune Cells for the Treatment of Lymphoid Malignancies after Donor Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase I trial identifies the best dose and effect of patient-derived genetically modified CAR-T cells in treating patients with CD19+ advanced B-cell lymphoma or leukemia after they have received a bone marrow transplant from a related donor. CAR T-cell therapy is a type of treatment in which a patient's T cells (a type of immune system cell) are changed in the laboratory so they will attack cancer cells. T cells are taken from a patient’s blood. Then the gene for a special receptor that binds to a certain protein on the patient’s cancer cells is added to the T cells in the laboratory. The special receptor is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Large numbers of the CAR T cells are grown in the laboratory and given to the patient by infusion. This trial aims to find out the highest dose of these special T-cells that can be given safely to leukemia and lymphoma patients and learn how and whether T cells can be rapidly made. This study also investigates how long the changed T-cells stay in the body, and if adding them to a standard bone marrow transplant can improve how patients respond to treatment. Receiving the T-cell infusion may help to control the disease.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • T Cells Expressing Fully-human Anti-CD19 and Anti-CD20 Chimeric Antigen Receptors for Treating B-cell Malignancies and Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Background: CD19 and CD20 are often found on certain cancer cells. Researchers think that a person s T cells can be modified in a lab to kill cells that have CD19 and CD20 on the surface. Objective: To see if it is safe to give anti-CD19 and anti-CD20 CAR T cells to people with a B cell cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with a B cell cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma that has not been controlled with standard therapies Design: Participants will be screened under protocol 01C0129 with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and heart tests Bone marrow biopsy: A needle is inserted into the participant s hip bone to remove a small amount of marrow. Scans Participants will have apheresis: Blood will be removed through a vein. The blood with circulate through a machine that removes the T cells. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant. Once a day for 3 days before they get the T cells, participants will receive chemotherapy through a vein. Participants will receive the T cells through a vein. They will stay in the hospital for at least 9 days. Participants may have a lumbar puncture: A needle will remove fluid from the spinal cord. Participants may have a tumor biopsy. Participants will repeat the screening tests throughout the study. Participants will have follow-up visits 2 weeks after infusion; monthly for 4 months; at 6, 9, and 12 months; every 6 months for 3 years; and then annually for 5 years. Participants will then be contacted annually for 15 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Gene Modified Immune Cells (IL13Ralpha2 CAR T Cells) after Conditioning Regimen for the Treatment of Stage IIIC or IV Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified immune cells (IL13Ralpha2 CAR T cells) after a chemotherapy conditioning regimen for the treatment of patients with stage IIIC or IV melanoma. The study agent is called IL13Ralpha2 CAR T cells. T cells are a special type of white blood cell (immune cells) that have the ability to kill tumor cells. The T cells are obtained from the patients own blood, grown in a laboratory, and modified by adding the IL13Ralpha2 CAR gene. The IL13Ralpha2 CAR gene is inserted into T cells with a virus called a lentivirus. The lentivirus allows cells to make the IL13Ralpha2 CAR protein. This CAR has been designed to bind to a protein on the surface of tumor cells called IL13Ralpha2. This study is being done to determine the dose at which the gene-modified immune cells are safe, how long the cells stay in the body, and if the cells are able to attack the cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • IRX-2, Cyclophosphamide, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects of IRX-2, cyclophosphamide, and pembrolizumab work in treating participants with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has come back or that has spread to other places in the body. Interleukins, such as those found in IRX-2, are proteins made by white blood cells and other cells in the body and may help regulate immune response. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving RX-2, cyclophosphamide, and pembrolizumab may work better in treating participants with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Rituximab Hyaluronidase in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma in Uganda

    This phase I trial studies how well rituximab hyaluronidase and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients in Uganda with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease. Rituximab hyaluronidase is a combination of rituximab and hyaluronidase. Rituximab binds to a molecule called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Hyaluronidase allows rituximab to be given by injection under the skin. Giving rituximab and hyaluronidase by injection under the skin is faster than giving rituximab alone by infusion into the blood. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, doxorubicin, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. While rituximab has a clear survival benefit in patients within developed countries, differences in supportive care and infectious co-morbidities require special attention. Giving rituximab hyaluronidase alone or in combination with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease compared to chemotherapy alone in Uganda.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Dinutuximab, Sargramostim, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well dinutuximab and sargramostim work with combination chemotherapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sargramostim helps the body produce normal infection-fighting white blood cells. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant, with drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, melphalan, etoposide, carboplatin, topotecan, and isotretinoin, helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in a patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells). Giving dinutuximab and sargramostim with combination chemotherapy may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Molecular Profile of Breast Cancer in Ugandan Patients with Stage IIB-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trials studies the molecular profile of breast cancer in Ugandan patients with stage IIB-III breast cancer. Creating a molecular profile of breast cancer my help doctors learn more about biological factors associated with breast cancer in Ugandan patients with as well as measure the benefits of locally available diagnostic studies and the possibility of providing treatment via oral medication.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington