Clinical Trials Using Cyclophosphamide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cyclophosphamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 351-375 of 383

  • Comparing ATG or Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide to Calcineurin Inhibitor-Methotrexate as GVHD Prophylaxis after Myeloablative Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies how well 3 different drug combinations prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD) after donor stem cell transplant. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, may stop the activity of donor cells that can cause GVHD. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, may also stop the donor cells that can lead to GVHD while not affecting the cancer-fighting donor cells. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), is used to decrease the body's immune response and reduces the risk of GVHD. It is not yet known which combination of drugs: 1) ATG, methotrexate, and calcineurin inhibitor 2) cyclophosphamide and calcineurin inhibitor, or 3) methotrexate and calcineurin inhibitor may work best to prevent graft versus host disease and result in best overall outcome after donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Ibrutinib, Rituximab, Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HIV-Positive Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effect and best dose of ibrutinib in combination with rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib and etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with HIV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.
    Location: 15 locations

  • T Cells Expressing Fully-human Anti-CD19 and Anti-CD20 Chimeric Antigen Receptors for Treating B-cell Malignancies and Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Background: CD19 and CD20 are often found on certain cancer cells. Researchers think that a person s T cells can be modified in a lab to kill cells that have CD19 and CD20 on the surface. Objective: To see if it is safe to give anti-CD19 and anti-CD20 CAR T cells to people with a B cell cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with a B cell cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma that has not been controlled with standard therapies Design: Participants will be screened under protocol 01C0129 with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and heart tests Bone marrow biopsy: A needle is inserted into the participant s hip bone to remove a small amount of marrow. Scans Participants will have apheresis: Blood will be removed through a vein. The blood with circulate through a machine that removes the T cells. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant. Once a day for 3 days before they get the T cells, participants will receive chemotherapy through a vein. Participants will receive the T cells through a vein. They will stay in the hospital for at least 9 days. Participants may have a lumbar puncture: A needle will remove fluid from the spinal cord. Participants may have a tumor biopsy. Participants will repeat the screening tests throughout the study. Participants will have follow-up visits 2 weeks after infusion; monthly for 4 months; at 6, 9, and 12 months; every 6 months for 3 years; and then annually for 5 years. Participants will then be contacted annually for 15 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Phase I Study of Autologous huMNC2-CAR44 T Cells for Breast Cancer Targeting Cleaved Form of MUC1 (MUC1*)

    Phase I study of adoptive immunotherapy for advanced MUC1* positive breast cancer with autologous T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor, huMNC2-CAR44 specific for a cleaved form of MUC1 (MUC1*)
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Rituximab Hyaluronidase in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma in Uganda

    This phase I trial studies how well rituximab hyaluronidase and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients in Uganda with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease. Rituximab hyaluronidase is a combination of rituximab and hyaluronidase. Rituximab binds to a molecule called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Hyaluronidase allows rituximab to be given by injection under the skin. Giving rituximab and hyaluronidase by injection under the skin is faster than giving rituximab alone by infusion into the blood. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, doxorubicin, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. While rituximab has a clear survival benefit in patients within developed countries, differences in supportive care and infectious co-morbidities require special attention. Giving rituximab hyaluronidase alone or in combination with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease compared to chemotherapy alone in Uganda.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • IRX-2, Cyclophosphamide, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose and side effects of IRX-2 in combination with cyclophosphamide and nivolumab in treating patients with solid tumors that have come back (recurrent) or have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). IRX-2 is a cell derived biologics which is made by cells of the immune system (a system that defends the body against infections). IRX-2 regimen may attempt to correct immune system defect and restore the immune system in order to improve the body’s ability to fight the cancer. Cyclophosphamide may help in reversing suppression of immune response in cancer patients and reducing the immunosuppressive effects of T regulated cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving IRX-2 and cyclophosphamide with nivolumab may work better than nivolumab alone in treating patients with recurrent or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • 211At-BC8-B10 followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of a radioactive agent linked to an antibody (211At-BC8-B10) followed by donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, or acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or isn't responding to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as 211At-BC8-B10, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells, called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and sirolimus after a transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Molecular Profile of Breast Cancer in Ugandan Patients with Stage IIB-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trials studies the molecular profile of breast cancer in Ugandan patients with stage IIB-III breast cancer. Creating a molecular profile of breast cancer my help doctors learn more about biological factors associated with breast cancer in Ugandan patients with as well as measure the benefits of locally available diagnostic studies and the possibility of providing treatment via oral medication.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • BCMA-Specific CAR T-Cells Combined with a Gamma Secretase Inhibitor (JSMD194) to Treat Relapsed or Persistent Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial determines the side effects and best dose of B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells when combined with gamma-secretase inhibitor LY3039478 (JSMD194), cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine in treating participants with multiple myeloma that that has come back or remains despite treatment. Placing genes added in the laboratory into immune T-cells may make the T-cells recognize BCMA, a protein on the surface of cancer cells. JSMD194 may enhance the killing of cancer cells by increasing the BCMA expression on multiple myeloma cells, making the targeted BCMA CAR-T treatment more effective. JSMD194 also decreases the amount of BCMA found in the circulation (called soluble BCMA) that is not bound to the myeloma cells. JSMD194 can therefore reduce the potential for soluble BCMA to act as a decoy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BCMA CAR T therapy with JSMD194, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine may work better in treating participants with relapsed or persistent multiple myeloma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Nivolumab and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab and cyclophosphamide works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia and higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Given nivolumab and cyclophosphamide may work better at treating acute myeloid leukemia and higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • IRX-2 Regimen, Cyclophosphamide, and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of the IRX-2 regimen when given together with cyclophosphamide and durvalumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Many cancers in humans, including head and neck cancer, are associated with defects in the immune system. IRX-2 is a mixture of substances made by human cells stimulated in a laboratory to make these substances (proteins) that can “turn on” the immune system. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known if the IRX-2 regimen, cyclophosphamide, and durvalumab will work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel followed by Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Human Chimeric Antigen Receptor Modified T-Cells with or without Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Mesothelin-Expressing Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of human chimeric antigen receptor modified T-cells (huCART-meso cells) with or without cyclophosphamide in treating patients with mesothelin-expressing cancers. T-cells or white blood cells can be genetically modified by introducing a receptor called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that recognizes mesothelin protein. Using huCART-meso cells can help identify cancerous cells and may improve the body's ability to fight mesothelin-expressing cancers. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether huCART-meso cells with or without cyclophosphamide work better in treating patients with mesothelin-expressing cancers.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 160 locations

  • Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells from Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts from HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    This phase II trial is for patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myeloid leukemia who have been referred for a peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to treat their cancer. In these transplants, chemotherapy and total-body radiotherapy ('conditioning') are used to kill residual leukemia cells and the patient's normal blood cells, especially immune cells that could reject the donor cells. Following the chemo / radiotherapy, blood stem cells from the donor are infused. These stem cells will grow and eventually replace the patient's original blood system, including red cells that carry oxygen to our tissues, platelets that stop bleeding from damaged vessels, and multiple types of immune-system white blood cells that fight infections. Mature donor immune cells, especially a type of immune cell called T lymphocytes (or T cells) are transferred along with these blood-forming stem cells. T cells are a major part of the curative power of transplantation because they can attack leukemia cells that have survived the chemo / radiation therapy and also help to fight infections after transplantation. However, donor T cells can also attack a patient's healthy tissues in an often-dangerous condition known as Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD). Drugs that suppress immune cells are used to decrease the severity of GVHD; however, they are incompletely effective and prolonged immunosuppression used to prevent and treat GVHD significantly increases the risk of serious infections. Removing all donor T cells from the transplant graft can prevent GVHD, but doing so also profoundly delays infection-fighting immune reconstitution and eliminates the possibility that donor immune cells will kill residual leukemia cells. Work in animal models found that depleting a type of T cell, called naive T cells or T cells that have never responded to an infection, can diminish GVHD while at least in part preserving some of the benefits of donor T cells including resistance to infection and the ability to kill leukemia cells. This clinical trial studies how well the selective removal of naive T cells works in preventing GVHD after peripheral blood stem cell transplants. This study will include patients conditioned with high or medium intensity chemo / radiotherapy who can receive donor grafts from related or unrelated donors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Adjuvant Tumor Lysate Vaccine and Iscomatrix With or Without Metronomic Oral Cyclophosphamide and Celecoxib in Patients With Malignancies Involving Lungs, Esophagus, Pleura, or Mediastinum

    Background: During recent years, cancer-testis (CT) antigens (CTA), particularly those encoded by genes on the X chromosome (CT-X genes), have emerged as attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Whereas malignancies of diverse histologies express a variety of CTAs, immune responses to these proteins appear uncommon in cancer patients, possibly due to low-level, heterogeneous antigen expression, as well as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells present within tumor sites and systemic circulation of these individuals. Conceivably, vaccination of cancer patients with tumor cells expressing high levels of CTAs in combination with regimens that deplete or inhibit T regulatory cells will induce broad immunity to these antigens. In order to examine this issue, patients with primary lung and esophageal cancers, pleural mesotheliomas, thoracic sarcomas, thymic neoplasms and mediastinal germ cell tumors, as well as sarcomas, melanomas, germ cell tumors, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum with no evidence of disease (NED) or minimal residual disease (MRD) following standard multidisciplinary therapy will be vaccinated with H1299 tumor cell lysates with Iscomatrix adjuvant. Vaccines will be administered with or without metronomic oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg PO BID x 7d q 14d), and celecoxib (400 mg PO BID). Serologic responses to a variety of recombinant CTAs as well as immunologic responses to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBVtransformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after a six month vaccination period. Primary Objectives: 1. To assess the frequency of immunologic responses to CTAs in patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccines alone in comparison to patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix vaccines in combination with metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. Secondary Objectives: 1. To examine if oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib therapy diminishes the number and percentage of T regulatory cells and diminishes activity of these cells in patients with thoracic malignancies are at risk of recurrence. 2. To examine if H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccination enhances immunologic response to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBV-transformed lymphocytes (B cells). Eligibility: - Patients with histologically or cytologically proven small cell or non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC;NSCLC), esophageal cancer (EsC), malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) , thymic or mediastinal germ cell tumors, thoracic sarcomas, or melanomas, sarcomas, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum who have no clinical evidence of active disease (NED), or minimal residual disease (MRD) not readily accessible by non-invasive biopsy or resection / radiation following standard therapy completed within the past 26 weeks. - Patients must be 18 years or older with an ECOG performance status of 0 2. - Patients must have adequate bone marrow, kidney, liver, lung and cardiac function. - Patients may not be on systemic immunosuppressive medications at time vaccinations commence. Design: - Following recovery from surgery, chemotherapy, or chemo / XRT, patients with NED or MRD will be vaccinated via IM injection with H1299 cell lysates and Iscomatrix(TM) adjuvant monthly for 6 months. - Vaccines will be administered with or without with metronomic oral cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. - Systemic toxicities and immunologic response to therapy will be recorded. Pre and post vaccination serologic and cell mediated responses to a standard panel of CT antigens as well as autologous tumor cells (if available) and EBV-transformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after vaccination. - Numbers / percentages and function of T regulatory cells in peripheral blood will be assessed before, during, and after vaccinations. - Patients will be followed in the clinic with routine staging scans until disease recurrence. - The trial will randomize 28 evaluable patients per arm to either receive vaccine alone or vaccine plus chemotherapy in order to have 80% power to determine if the frequency of immune responses on the combination arm exceeds that of the vaccine alone arm, if the expected frequencies of immune responses on the two arms were 20% and 50%, using a one-sided 0.10 alpha level Fisher s exact
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, called brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 145 locations

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients with Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III-IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Scleroderma Treatment with Autologous Transplant (STAT) Study

    This phase II trial studies how well giving cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin together followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) and mycophenolate mofetil works in treating patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored prior to treatment. To store the stem cells patients are given colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF) or chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) to help stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. After storage, patients are then given high-dose chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide, and immunosuppression with anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress the immune system to prepare for the transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and immunosuppression. After the stem cells have “engrafted” and have matured enough to support the immune system at approximately 2-3 months, patients are given a medication called mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or Myfortic. This medication is given to prevent worsening or reactivation of SSc and is referred to as maintenance therapy.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Cladribine, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab for the Primary Treatment of Macroglobulinemic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies how well cladribine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab work for the primary treatment of macroglobulinemic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving cladribine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab may work better in shrinking lymphoma cells compared to each drug by itself.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide and Abatacept for the Treatment of Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Hematologic Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide and abatacept work in reducing the incidence of moderate and severe chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following donor stem cell transplantation in patients with hematologic (blood) cancers. GVHD occurs when the cells from the donor (the graft) see the body's cells (the host) as different and attack them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as abatacept, is used to decrease the body’s immune response. The combination of cyclophosphamide and abatacept following donor stem cell transplantation may work better in reducing the incidence of moderate and severe chronic GVHD compared to standard of care.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Palifermin with Leuprolide Acetate or Degarelix after Total-Body Irradiation Based Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well palifermin with leuprolide acetate or degarelix works after total body-irradiation based donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies (cancer of the blood or bone marrow). Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving palifermin and leuprolide acetate or degarelix and removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether giving palifermin with leuprolide acetate or degarelix is more effective in helping the immune system recover faster after a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York