Clinical Trials Using Cyclophosphamide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cyclophosphamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 377

  • Eribulin Mesylate Followed by Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with HER2-Negative Inflammatory Breast Cancer before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well eribulin mesylate works in combination with doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative inflammatory breast cancer before surgery. Eribulin mesylate works by interfering with cancer cell division, growth, and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving eribulin mesylate together with doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide before surgery may be an effective treatment in HER2-negative inflammatory breast cancer patients.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Sirolimus and Metronomic Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent and / or Refractory Solid or Central Nervous System Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus and continuous or frequent treatment with low doses of chemotherapy work in treating younger patients with solid or central nervous system (CNS) tumors that have come back (recurrent) or have not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Biological therapies, such as sirolimus, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, celecoxib, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving sirolimus together with metronomic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for solid and CNS tumors.
    Location: 7 locations

  • LMP1 / BARF1 / EBNA1-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes with or without Cyclophosphamide and Fludarabine in Treating Participants with EBV-Positive Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of LMP1 / BARF1 / EBNA1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes when given together with or without cyclophosphamide and fludarabine in treating participants with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoma. Immunotoxins, such as LMP1 / BARF1 / EBNA1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find certain cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving LMP1 / BARF1 / EBNA1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine together may work better in treating participants with EBV-positive lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Adult Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating adult patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Risk-Adapted Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Mature B-Cell Lymphoma or Leukemia

    Many children and young adults with mature B-cell lymphoma can be cured with current standard treatments, but these standard treatments do not stop every child’s cancer from coming back. Furthermore, many children have significant side effects from treatment, both at the time of treatment and for many years after treatment is completed (late effects). That is why there is still much to be learned about this disease and its treatment. This study is being done to help researchers learn more about the biology and genetics of this disease in children in the United States (U.S.) and at several international sites and to study the effects (good and bad) of this treatment in St. Jude participants in order to help researchers guide treatment for children and young adults with this disease in the future.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematological Malignancies Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    In an effort to lower the occurrences and severity of graft-versus-host disease in patients and to lower the rate of transplant failure, researchers would like to specially treat the donor's blood cells to remove cells that are most likely to attack patients' tissues. This will occur in combination with intense conditioning treatment that patients will receive before having a transplant.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of ALLO-715 BCMA Allogenic CAR T Cells in in Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma (UNIVERSAL)

    The purpose of the UNIVERSAL study is to assess the safety, efficacy, cell kinetics, and immunogenicity of ALLO-715 in adults with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma after a lymphodepletion regimen of ALLO-647 in combination with fludarabine and / or cyclophosphamide, or ALLO-647 alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Preliminary Activity of Idasanutlin in Combination With Either Chemotherapy or Venetoclax in the Treatment of Pediatric and Young Adult Participants With Relapsed / Refractory Acute Leukemias or Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase I / II, multicenter, open-label, multi-arm study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of idasanutlin, administered as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy or venetoclax, in pediatric and young adult participants with acute leukemias or solid tumors. This study is divided into three parts: Part 1 will begin with dose escalation of idasanutlin as a single agent in pediatric participants with relapsed or refractory solid tumors to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) / maximum administered dose (MAD) and to characterize dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Following MTD / MAD identification, three separate safety run-in cohorts in neuroblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be conducted to identify the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of idasanutlin in each combination, with chemotherapy or venetoclax. Part 2 will evaluate the safety and early efficacy of idasanutlin in combination with chemotherapy or venetoclax in newly enrolled pediatric and young adult participants in neuroblastoma, AML,and ALL cohorts at idasanutlin RP2D. Part 3 will potentially be conducted as an additional expansion phase of the idasanutlin combination cohorts in neuroblastoma, AML, or ALL for further response and safety assessment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cell Therapy (CIML NK Cells) for the Treatment of Recurrent Myeloid Disease after Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cell therapy (CIML NK cells) in treating patients with myeloid disease that has come back (recurrent) after undergoing a donor blood stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. CIML NK cells may recognize and kill cancer cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells, including natural killer cells, to kill myeloid cells. Giving CIML NK cells with aldesleukin may increase the levels of NK cells and kill more myeloid cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of an Immunotherapeutic, DPX-Survivac, in Combination With Low Dose Cyclophosphamide & Pembrolizumab, in Subjects With Selected Advanced & Recurrent Solid Tumors

    This study will assess the safety and efficacy of DPX-Survivac and low dose cyclophosphamide with pembrolizumab in subjects with selected advanced and recurrent solid tumours.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Nivolumab and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and standard chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer. Immunotherapy with a monoclonal antibody such as nivolumab works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1. PD-1 is a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Antibodies that block PD-1 can potentially prevent PD-1 from shutting down the immune system, thus allowing immune cells to recognize and destroy tumor cells. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the addition of nivolumab to standard chemotherapy improves response rate in patients with inflammatory breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study To Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety Of Atezolizumab or Placebo in Combination With Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin + Cyclophosphamide Followed By Paclitaxel + Trastuzumab + Pertuzumab In Early Her2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This study (also known as IMpassion050) will evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab compared with placebo when given in combination with neoadjuvant dose-dense anthracycline (doxorubicin) + cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel + trastuzumab + pertuzumab (ddAC-PacHP) in patients with early HER2-positive breast cancer (T2-4, N1-3, M0).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Nivolumab with Standard of Care Chemotherapy for First Line Treatment in Patients with Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab works with standard of care chemotherapy for first line treatment in patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab with standard of care chemotherapy may work better as first line treatment in patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Total Body Irradiation before TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes Donor Transplant in Treating Participants with High-Risk Myeloid Diseases

    This phase I trial studies how well reduced intensity chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes donor transplant) works in treating participants with high-risk myeloid diseases. Giving chemotherapy such as anti-thymocyte globulin and fludarabine phosphate, as well as total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the participant's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study Comparing Atezolizumab (Anti PD-L1 Antibody) In Combination With Adjuvant Anthracycline / Taxane-Based Chemotherapy Versus Chemotherapy Alone In Patients With Operable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of adjuvant atezolizumab in combination with paclitaxel, followed by atezolizumab, dose-dense doxorubicin or epirubicin (investigator's choice), and cyclophosphamide, compared with paclitaxel followed by dose-dense doxorubicin or epirubicin (investigator's choice) and cyclophosphamide alone in patients with Stage II-III TNBC (Triple Negative Breast Cancer)
    Location: 2 locations

  • TCR-engineered T Cells in Solid Tumors Including NSCLC and HCC Patients

    The study purpose is to establish the safety and tolerability of IMA202 product in patients with solid tumors that express melanoma-associated antigen 1 (MAGEA1).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Everolimus, Nelarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide Phosphate in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of everolimus and to see how well it works when given together with nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide phosphate in treating patients with T cell lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as everolimus, nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Modified Immune Cells (GD2 Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor and IL-15 Expressing Autologous Natural Killer T-Cells) in Treating Children with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of GD2 specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and interleukin-15 (IL-15) expressing autologous natural killer T-cells (G28z.15 NKTs) in treating children with neuroblastoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. This trial combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and natural killer T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. GD2-CAR natural killer T cells are modified immune cells that have been engineered in the laboratory to specifically target GD2 proteins found on neuroblastoma tumor cells and kill them. IL-15 is critical for the development and maintenance of T cells. These new cells may be able to slow the growth of tumor cells in patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide and IRX-2 in Treating Women with Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 or Squamous Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide and IRX-2 work in treating women with cervical squamous intraepithelial neoplasia 3 or squamous vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia 3. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. IRX-2 may act as an immune booster to stimulate the immune system. Giving cyclophosphamide and IRX-2 may work better at treating cervical squamous intraepithelial neoplasia or squamous vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Adult T-Cell Leukemia / Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with adult T-cell leukemia / lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody that also has a chemotherapy drug attached to it. Antibodies are proteins that are part of the immune system. They can stick to and attack specific targets on cancer cells. The antibody part of brentuximab vedotin sticks to a target called CD30 that is located on the outside of the cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, etoposide phosphate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy together may work better in treating patients with adult T-cell leukemia / lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation in Sickle Cell Patients (BMT CTN 1507)

    This is a Phase II, single arm, multi-center trial, designed to estimate the efficacy and toxicity of haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Based on their age and entry criteria patients are stratified into two groups: (1) children with SCD with strokes; and (2) adults with severe SCD.
    Location: 6 locations

  • CD19 / CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Children or Young Adults with Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of CD19 / CD22 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how well they work in treating children or young adults with CD19 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. A CAR is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells (T cells) can attack cancer cells by recognizing and responding to the CD19 / CD22 proteins. These proteins are commonly found on B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CD19 / CD22-CAR T cells and chemotherapy may work better in treating children or young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • T-allo10 Cell Infusion before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Blood Cancer

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of T-allo10 cells and to see how well they work when given before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancer that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving T-allo10 cells before the transplant may help prevent this from happening. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving T-allo10 cells before donor stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with blood cancer that has come back or dose not respond to treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide, Nivolumab, GVAX Pancreas Vaccine, and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide, nivolumab, GVAX pancreas vaccine, and stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that may be removed by surgery (borderline resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. GVAX pancreas vaccine is made from other patients’ pancreatic cancer cells. The cells were changed in a laboratory to make a protein called GM-CSF. GM-CSF helps to activate a person’s own immune system cells to recognize and attack cancer cells. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. It is not yet known if cyclophosphamide, nivolumab, GVAX pancreas vaccine, and stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better than giving either one alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • rQNestin34.5v.2 with or without Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of oncolytic HSV-1 rQNestin34.5v.2 (rQNestin34.5v.2) with or without cyclophosphamide in treating patients with malignant glioma that has come back (recurrent). rQNestin34.5v.2 is a drug made from the herpes simplex virus type I, and if it is effective, may spread to a tumor cell, kill it, and then make a copy of itself and spread again. This should be repeated over and over until all tumor cells are reached. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving rQNestin34.5v.2 with or without cyclophosphamide may work better in treating patients with recurrent malignant glioma.
    Location: 2 locations