Clinical Trials Using Cyclosporine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cyclosporine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-20 of 20
  • Radiation- and Alkylator-free Bone Marrow Transplantation Regimen for Patients With Dyskeratosis Congenita

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a disease that affects numerous parts of the body, most typically causing failure of the blood system. Lung disease, liver disease and cancer are other frequent causes of illness and death. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure the blood system but can make the lung and liver disease and risk of cancer worse, because of DNA damaging agents such as alkylators and radiation that are typically used in the procedure. Based on the biology of DC, we hypothesize that it may be possible to avoid these DNA damaging agents in patients with DC, and still have a successful BMT. In this protocol we will test whether a regimen that avoids DNA alkylators and radiation can permit successful BMT without compromising survival in patients with DC.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Graft Versus Host Disease-Reduction Strategies for Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant Patients with Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial investigates three strategies and how well they work for the reduction of graft versus host disease in patients with acute leukemia in remission. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Children and Young Adults with Blood Cancers or Non-malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies the effect of chemotherapy and a cord blood transplant in children and young adults with hematologic malignancies or non-malignant diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as clofarabine, fludarabine, and busulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Before receiving stem cells, the standard process, called cytoreduction, is to receive high doses of chemotherapy. This helps to make room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow, helps prevent the body from rejecting the transplanted cells, and helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body. This is called a conditioning regimen. However, high doses of chemotherapy can have serious side effects. This study may help researchers learn whether combining the chemotherapy drugs clofarabine, fludarabine, and busulfan is a safe and effective way to reduce the side effects from receiving a conditioning regimen in children and young adults receiving cord blood transplants.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant after Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory High-Risk Solid Tumors in Pediatric and Adolescent-Young Adults

    This phase II trial investigates side effects and how well donor stem cell transplant after chemotherapy works in treating pediatric and adolescent-young adults with high-risk solid tumor that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine, thiotepa, etoposide, melphalan, and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CLAG-M Chemotherapy and Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of total body irradiation when given with CLAG-M chemotherapy reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant with Treosulfan, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation for the Treatment of Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor stem cell transplant, treosulfan, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation work in treating patients with blood cancers (hematological malignancies). Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Comparison of Triple GVHD Prophylaxis Regimens for Nonmyeloablative or Reduced Intensity Conditioning Unrelated Mobilized Blood Cell Transplantation

    This randomized phase II trial includes a blood stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor to treat blood cancer. The treatment also includes chemotherapy drugs, but in lower doses than conventional (standard) stem cell transplants. The researchers will compare two different drug combinations used to reduce the risk of a common but serious complication called "graft versus host disease" (GVHD) following the transplant. Two drugs, cyclosporine (CSP) and sirolimus (SIR), will be combined with either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy). This part of the transplant procedure is the main research focus of the study.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • 211^At-BC8-B10 before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Mixed-Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of 211^astatine(At)-BC8-B10 before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or mixed-phenotype acute leukemia. Radioactive substances, such as astatine-211, linked to monoclonal antibodies, such as BC8, can bind to cancer cells and give off radiation which may help kill cancer cells and have less of an effect on healthy cells before donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Brentuximab Vedotin, Cyclosporine, and Verapamil Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of brentuximab vedotin and cyclosporine when given together with verapamil hydrochloride in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Immunosuppressive therapies, such as cyclosporine, may improve bone marrow function and increase blood cell counts. Verapamil hydrochloride may increase the effectiveness of brentuximab vedotin by overcoming drug resistance of the cancer cells. Giving brentuximab vedotin, cyclosporine, and verapamil hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Fludarabine-Based Conditioning before Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Patients with Acquired Aplastic Anemia or Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    This trial studies how well fludarabine-based reduced intensity conditioning regimen works in preventing transplant rejection in patients with aplastic anemia or inherited bone marrow failure syndromes scheduled to undergo donor bone marrow transplant. Reduced intensity conditioning involves giving medicines that decrease the amount of white blood cells in the body. These cells support the immune system which fights infection and also help the body identify anything that is new and determine if it needs to get rid of it. Decreasing the amount of white blood cells may help the new bone marrow to get accepted and not be rejected by the body’s immune system.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Myeloablative or Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimen in Treating Patients with High-Risk, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well a myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is high-risk, has come back, or does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy (myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimen) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus or cyclosporine after the transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens given before the transplant will work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Ibritumomab Tiuxetan before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibritumomab tiuxetan before donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, and total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Also, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as ibritumomab tiuxetan, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, and TLI before the transplant together with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Methylprednisolone, Horse Anti-Thymocyte Globulin, Cyclosporine, Filgrastim, and / or Pegfilgrastim or Pegfilgrastim Biosimilar in Treating Patients with Aplastic Anemia or Low or Intermediate-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies methylprednisolone, horse anti-thymocyte globulin, cyclosporine, filgrastim, and / or pegfilgrastim or pegfilgrastim biosimilar in treating patients with aplastic anemia or low or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Horse anti-thymocyte globulin is made from horse blood and targets immune cells known as T-lymphocytes. Since T-lymphocytes are believed to be involved in causing low blood counts in aplastic anemia and in some cases of myelodysplastic syndromes, killing these cells may help treat the disease. Methylprednisolone and cyclosporine work to suppress immune cells called lymphocytes. This may help to improve low blood counts in aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Filgrastim and pegfilgrastim are designed to cause white blood cells to grow. This may help to fight infections and help improve the white blood cell count. Giving methylprednisolone and horse anti-thymocyte globulin together with cyclosporine, filgrastim, and / or pegfilgrastim may be an effective treatment for patients with aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia and Other Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using G-CSF Mobilized CD34+ Selected Hematopoietic Precursor Cells Co-Infused With a Reduced Dose of Non-Mobilized Donor T-cells

    Background: - Stem cell transplants from related donors (allogenic stem cell transplants) can be used to treat individuals with certain kinds of severe blood diseases or cancers, such as severe anemia. Allogenic stem cell transplants encourage the growth of new bone marrow to replace that of the recipient. Because stem cell transplants can have serious complications, researchers are interested in developing new approaches to stem cell transplants that will reduce the likelihood of these complications. - By reducing the number of white blood cells included in the blood taken during the stem cell collection process, and replacing them with a smaller amount of white blood cells collected prior to stem cell donation, the stem cell transplant may be less likely to cause severe complications for the recipient. Researchers are investigating whether altering the stem cell transplant donation procedure in this manner will improve the likelihood of a successful stem cell transplant with fewer complications. Objectives: - To evaluate a new method of stem cell transplantation that may reduce the possibly of severe side effects or transplant rejection in the recipient. Eligibility: - Recipient: Individuals between 4 and 80 years of age who have been diagnosed with a blood disease that can be treated with allogenic stem cell transplants. - Donor: Individuals between 4 and 80 years of age who are related to the recipient and are eligible to donate blood. OR unrelated donors found through the National Marrow Donor Program. Design: - All participants will be screened with a physical examination and medical history. - DONORS: - Donors will undergo an initial apheresis procedure to donate white blood cells. - After the initial donation, donors will receive injections of filgrastim to release bone marrow cells into the blood. - After 5 days of filgrastim injections, donors will have apheresis again to donate stem cells that are present in the blood. - RECIPIENTS: - Recipients will provide an initial donation of white blood cells to be used for research purposes only. - From 7 days before the stem cell transplant, participants will be admitted to the inpatient unit of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center and will receive regular doses of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress their immune system and prepare for the transplant. - After the initial chemotherapy, participants will receive the donated white blood cells and stem cells as a single infusion. - After the stem cell and white blood cell transplant, participants will have regular doses of cyclosporine and methotrexate to prevent rejection of the donor cells. Participants will have three doses of methotrexate within the week after the transplant, but will continue to take cyclosporine for up to 4 months after the transplant. - Participants will remain in inpatient care for up to 1 month after the transplant, and will be followed with regular visits for up to 3 years with periodic visits thereafter to evaluate the success of the transplant and any side effects.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning Regimen for the Treatment of Non-Malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with non-cancer (non-malignant) disorders. Reduced intensity conditioning involves giving medicines that suppress the immune system before giving the donor stem cells. It does not completely eliminate the blood making cells in bone marrow. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen may result in fewer short and long term side effects, shorter hospital stay than after conditioning that completely destroys the bone marrow, and blood counts may recover more quickly.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Campath / Fludarabine / Melphalan Transplant Conditioning for Non-Malignant Diseases

    The hypothesis for this study is that a preparative regimen that maximizes host immunosuppression without myeloablation will be well tolerated and sufficient for engraftment of donor hematopoietic cells. It is also to determine major toxicities from these conditioning regimens, within the first 100 days after transplantation.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant, Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation in Treating Patients with Hematologic Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well giving an umbilical cord blood transplant together with cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation (TBI) works in treating patients with hematologic disease. Giving chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, and TBI before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer and abnormal cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • A Phase II Dose-escalation Study Characterizing the PK of Eltrombopag in Pediatric Patients With Previously Untreated or Relapsed Severe Aplastic Anemia or Recurrent Aplastic Anemia

    This is a phase II, open label, multi-center, intra-patient dose escalation study to characterize the pharmacokinetics after oral administration of eltrombopag in combination with immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric patients with previously untreated or relapsed / refractory severe aplastic anemia or recurrent aplastic anemia. All patients will be treated with eltrombopag for the 26-week Treatment Period, followed by a 52-week Follow-Up Period. Patients who have been previously untreated with immunosuppressive therapy will be treated according to the standard of care, hATG / cyclosporine, in addition to eltrombopag. Patients with relapsed / refractory SAA or recurrent AA will be enrolled into one of two treatment options: hATG / cyclosporine plus eltrombopag or cyclosporine plus eltrombopag, depending on prior treatment with immunosuppressive therapy. After initiating treatment with eltrombopag, patients will have their dose assessed and modified as tolerated, until the targeted platelet count or maximum dose is achieved. Pharmacokinetic assessments will be performed at time points intended to capture steady state PK of the starting dose and highest dose achieved. Upon completion of the Treatment and Follow-Up Periods, all patients will be offered the opportunity to enroll in an additional 3 year Long Term Follow-Up Period.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Comparing ATG or Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide to Calcineurin Inhibitor-Methotrexate as GVHD Prophylaxis after Myeloablative Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies how well 3 different drug combinations prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD) after donor stem cell transplant. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, may stop the activity of donor cells that can cause GVHD. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, may also stop the donor cells that can lead to GVHD while not affecting the cancer-fighting donor cells. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), is used to decrease the body's immune response and reduces the risk of GVHD. It is not yet known which combination of drugs: 1) ATG, methotrexate, and calcineurin inhibitor 2) cyclophosphamide and calcineurin inhibitor, or 3) methotrexate and calcineurin inhibitor may work best to prevent graft versus host disease and result in best overall outcome after donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington