Clinical Trials Using Cytarabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cytarabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 118

  • Prexasertib, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib when given together with mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Prexasertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving prexasertib, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome compared to mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Venetoclax in Combination with Intensive Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax in combination with intensive chemotherapy with daunorubicin and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax with daunorubicin and cytarabine may work better in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ascorbic Acid and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to therapy (refractory). Ascorbic acid may make cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy may work better at treating lymphoma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Intensive Chemotherapy With or Without Glasdegib or Azacitidine With or Without Glasdegib In Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Glasdegib is being studied in combination with azacitidine for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are not candidates for intensive induction chemotherapy (Non-intensive AML population). Glasdegib is being studied in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia (Intensive AML population).
    Location: 5 locations

  • Cytarabine or Vinblastine Sulfate and Prednisone in Treating Participants with Langerhans Cell Histocytosis

    This phase III trial studies how well cytarabine works compared to viblastine sulfate and prednisone in treating participants with Langerhans cell histocytosis. Cytarabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vinblastine sulfate and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not known if cytarabine may work better than vinblastine sulfate and prednisone in treating participants with Langerhans cell histocytosis.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Phase Ib / II Multicenter Open-label Study of BGB324 in Patients With AML or MDS

    A Phase Ib / II multicentre open label study of BGb324 as a single agent in patients with AML or MDS or in a combination with cytarabine and decitabine in AML patients. BGB324 is a potent selective small molecule inhibitor of Axl, a surface membrane protein kinase receptor which is overexpressed in up to half of AML cases.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Antiangiogenic Therapy for Children With Recurrent Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma and ATRT

    Patients with relapsed medulloblastoma, ependymoma and ATRT have a very poor prognosis whether treated with conventional chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, irradiation or combinations of these modalities. Antiangiogenetic therapy has emerged as new treatment option in solid malignancies. The frequent, metronomic schedule targets both proliferating tumor cells and endothelial cells, and minimizes toxicity. In this study the investigators will evaluate the use of biweekly intravenous bevacizumab in combination with five oral drugs (thalidomide, celecoxib, fenofibrate, and alternating cycles of daily low-dose oral etoposide and cyclophosphamide), augmented with alternating courses of intrathecal etoposide and cytarabine. The aim of the study is to extend therapy options for children with recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma, ependymoma and ATRT, for whom no known curative therapy exists, by prolonging survival while maintaining good quality of life. The primary objective of the MEMMAT trial is to evaluate the activity of this multidrug antiangiogenic approach in these heavily pretreated children and young adults. Additionally, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), as well as feasibility and toxicity will be examined.
    Location: 3 locations

  • CLAG-M Chemotherapy and Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of total body irradiation when given with CLAG-M chemotherapy reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • GPS Compared With BAT in AML CR2 / CR2p

    To assess the safety and efficacy of galinpepimut-S compared with investigator's choice of best available therapy (BAT) on overall survival (OS) in subjects with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are in second complete remission 2 (CR2) / second complete remission with incomplete platelet recovery (CR2p).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Donor Natural Killer Cell Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of donor natural killer (NK) cell therapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory), or myelodysplastic syndrome. Natural killer cells are a type of immune cell. Immunotherapy with genetically modified NK cells from donors may induce changes in the body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Venetoclax, SL-401, and Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax, SL-401, and chemotherapy works in treating patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. SL-401 is a recombinant protein consisting of IL-3 linked to a toxic agent called DT. IL-3 attaches to IL-3 receptors on tumor cells in a targeted way and delivers DT to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax and SL-401 with chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Continuous Infusion Chemotherapy (CI-CLAM) for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Other High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of a chemotherapy regimen given by continuous intravenous infusion (CI-CLAM), and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or other high-grade myeloid neoplasms. Drugs used in CI-CLAM include cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone, and work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Continuous intravenous infusion involves giving drugs over a time duration of equal to or more than 24 hours. Giving CLAM via continuous infusion may result in fewer side effects and have similar effectiveness when compared to giving CLAM over the shorter standard amount of time.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • CPX-351 or CLAG-M Regimen for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Other High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms in Medically Less-Fit Patients

    This phase II trial studies how well CPX-351 or the CLAG-M regimen (consisting of the drugs cladribine, cytarabine, G-CSF, and mitoxantrone) works in treating medically less-fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia or other high-grade myeloid neoplasms. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, cladribine, cytarabine, G-CSF, and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CPX-351 or the CLAG-M regimen at doses typically used for medically-fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia may work better than reduced doses of CPX-351 in treating medically less-fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia or other high-grade myeloid neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Combination Chemotherapy with Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial identifies the side effects and the activity of combination chemotherapy and gemtuzumab ozogamicin for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as cladribine and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor may improve white blood cells after chemotherapy for many cancers including acute myeloid leukemia. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Other objectives of this trial are to assess how strong the responses are, look at the average length of time patients stay in remission and how long they live, and to see what proportion of patients move onto a stem-cell / bone marrow transplant safely. Also, this trial will look to see whether certain characteristics of leukemia cells are linked to response and survival. Giving combination chemotherapy and gemtuzumab ozogamicin may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Cladribine, Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Quizartinib in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well cladribine, idarubicin, cytarabine, and quizartinib work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome that is newly diagnosed, has come back (relapsed), or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, idarubicin, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Quizartinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving quizartinib with cladribine, idarubicin, and cytarabine may help to control acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Temozolomide, Etoposide, Doxil, Dexamethasone, Ibrutinib, and Rituximab (TEDDI-R) in Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas With Secondary Involvement of the Central Nervous System (CNS)

    Background: Secondary central nervous system lymphoma (sCNSL) is cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat it do not cross the blood-brain barrier. This makes it hard to treat. Researchers hope that a new combination of drugs may be able to help. Objective: To find a better way to treat sCNSL. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with sCNSL Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Eye exam - Tissue or tumor biopsy - Collection of cerebrospinal fluid - CT, PET, and MRI scans: Participants will like in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Bone marrow aspirations or biopsies: A needle will be inserted into the participant s hipbone. The needle will remove a small amount of marrow. Participants will take the study drugs in 21-day cycles. They will take some drugs by mouth. They will take others through a catheter: A small tube will be inserted into a vein in the arm, neck, or chest. They may have drugs given through a catheter placed through the brain or injected into the spinal canal. Participants will have regular visits during the study. These will include repeats of the screening test. They may also provide a saliva sample or have a cheek swab. Participants will have up to 4 treatment cycles. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment dose. Then they will have visits every 3-6 months for 3 years and then yearly. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin with Standard Chemotherapy Regimen for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given with 3 and 4 drug standard chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as daunorubicin, vincristine, cytarabine, methotrexate, and pegaspargase, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to inotuzumab ozogamicin alone.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with MRD Positive CD22+ Relapsed B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating patients with minimal residual disease (MRD) positive CD22 positive (+) B cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma that has come back. Minimal residual disease is when there is evidence for remaining tumor following initial treatment that is only apparent using highly sensitive techniques, but there are no other signs of leukemia in the bone marrow or blood yet. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22+ cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B- or T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax and how well it works in combination with low-intensity chemotherapy in patients with B- or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has not responded to treatment or that has come back. Venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, including vincristine, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, rituximab, methotrexate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax with low-intensity chemotherapy may work better in treating patient with B- or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax in Combination with BEAM Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given in combination with standard chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplant. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well venetoclax works when given with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplant.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Ibrutinib, Rituximab, Venetoclax, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and rituximab given together with venetoclax and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy such as, venetoclax, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib, rituximab, and venetoclax together with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax, Cladribine, Low Dose Cytarabine, and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax, cladribine, low dose cytarabine, and azacitidine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has previously not been treated. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, cladribine, and low dose cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax, cladribine, low dose cytarabine induction followed by cladribine, low dose cytarabine, and azacitidine consolidation may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax, Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, and Melphalan before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan before stem cell transplant in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Ruxolitinib in Combination with Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Adolescents and Young Adults with Ph-Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of ruxolitinib in combination with standard chemotherapy in treating adolescents and young adults with Philadelphia (Ph)-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ruxolitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with h-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin with G-CSF, Cladribine, Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone in Treating Participants with Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasm

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dosing frequency of gemtuzumab ozogamicin when given in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone (GCLAM) and to see how well they work in treating participants with acute myeloid leukemia or high-grade myeloid tumors (neoplasms) that have not been previously treated. Antibody-drug conjugates, such as gemtuzumab ozogamicin, act by directly delivering toxic chemotherapy to cancer cells. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor is a growth factor used to stimulate leukemia cells and render them more sensitive to chemotherapy drugs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with G-CSF, cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride may work better in treating participants with acute myeloid leukemia or high-grade myeloid neoplasm.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington