Clinical Trials Using Cytarabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cytarabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 101-118 of 118

  • A Study of Gilteritinib (ASP2215) Combined With Chemotherapy in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3) / Internal Tandem Duplication (ITD) Positive Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    The purpose of the phase 1 portion (dose escalation) of the study will be to establish an optimally safe and biologically active recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and / or to determine maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for gilteritinib in sequential combination with fludarabine, cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG). The purpose of the phase 2 portion (dose expansion) is to determine complete remission (CR) rates and composite complete remission (CRc) rates after two cycles of therapy. The study will also assess safety, tolerability and toxicities of gilteritinib in combination with FLAG, evaluate FLT3 inhibition, assess pharmacokinetics (PK), perform serial measurements of minimal residual disease, obtain preliminary estimates of 1-year event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rate and assess the acceptability as well as palatability of the formulation. One cycle is defined as 28 days of treatment. A participant completing 2 cycles in phase 1 or 2 will have the option to participate in long term treatment (LTT) with gilteritinib (for up to 2 years).
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Best Available Therapy Versus Autologous Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Sclerosis (BEAT-MS)

    This is a multi-center prospective rater-masked (blinded) randomized controlled trial of 156 participants, comparing the treatment strategy of Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) to the treatment strategy of Best Available Therapy (BAT) for treatment-resistant relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants will be randomized at a 1 to 1 (1:1) ratio. All participants will be followed for 72 months after randomization (Day 0, Visit 0).
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Isatuximab in Combination With Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Primary Objective: To evaluate the anti-leukemic activity of isatuximab in combination with standard chemotherapies in pediatric participants of ages 28 days to less than 18 years with Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Secondary Objectives: - Safety and tolerability assessments - Assessment of infusion reactions (IRs) - Pharmacokinetics (PK) of isatuximab - Minimal residual disease - Overall response rate - Overall survival - Event free survival - Duration of response - Relationship between clinical effects and CD38 receptor density and occupancy
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called “anti-HIV genes” are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • BLAST MRD AML-1: BLockade of PD-1 Added to Standard Therapy to Target Measurable Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia 1- A Randomized Phase 2 Study of Anti-PD-1 Pembrolizumab in Combination with Intensive Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and idarubicin or daunorubicin with or without pembrolizumab work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine, idarubicin, and daunorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving induction chemotherapy with pembrolizumab may work better than induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Testing the Addition of an anti-cancer drug, KRT-232 (AMG 232), to the Usual Treatments (Cytarabine and Idarubicin) in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of KRT-232 (AMG 232) when given together with the standard chemotherapy drugs cytarabine and idarubicin in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. KRT-232 (AMG 232) may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called MDM2 that is needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cytarabine and idarubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving KRT-232 (AMG 232) with cytarabine and idarubicin may stabilize cancer for longer when compared to giving usual treatments alone.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Ivosidenib and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of IDH1 Mutant Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ivosidenib when given together with combination chemotherapy for the treatment of 1DH1 mutant acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Ivosidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking the IDH1 mutation and some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ivosidenib with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • A Study to Compare Blinatumomab Alone to Blinatumomab with Nivolumab in Patients Diagnosed with First Relapse B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

    This phase II trial investigates how well nivolumab when given together with blinatumomab work compared to blinatumomab alone in treating patients with CD19+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or Down syndrome that has come back (relapsed). Blinatumomab is an antibody, which is a protein that identifies and targets foreign substances in the body. Blinatumomab searches for and attaches itself to the cancer cell. Once attached, an immune response occurs that kills the cancer cell. Nivolumab is a medicine that is used to boost a patient’s immune system. Giving nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab may cause the cancer to stop growing for a period of time, and for some patients, it may lessen the symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Use of Steroids and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with Blinatumomab or Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults

    This phase III trial compares the effect of the combination of steroids, potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), and blinatumomab versus treatment with steroids, TKI, and chemotherapy. The usual approach for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, or targeted therapies that kill leukemia cells. These treatments are effective and typically control the ALL for a number of years, but are not curative and usually require chronic, indefinite treatment. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone and prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Methotrexate may slow the growth of cancer cells. Ponatinib and dasatinib and may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Blinatumomab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and cytarabine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The information gained from this study may help researchers to compare overall survival following the study approach with steroids, TKI, and blinatumomab versus the usual approach.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Modified Chemotherapy Regimen and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Pediatric Patients

    This phase I trial studies how well a modified chemotherapy regimen with gemtuzumab ozogamicin works for the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in pediatric patients. The current standard of care to treat most pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia is 5 cycles of chemotherapy. Adjusting treatment with a 4-cycle treatment regimen may provide the same treatment results and decrease the amount of side effects experienced during treatment. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Giving gemtuzumab ozogamicin with the 4-cycle treatment regimen may also reduce the chances of acute myeloid leukemia coming back after initial treatment.
    Location: Children's Healthcare of Atlanta - Egleston, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Pevonedistat with Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat and how well it works with combination chemotherapy in treating adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Pevonedistat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, dexamethasone, pegaspargase, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pevonedistat with chemotherapy may work better in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Global Study of Midostaurin in Combination With Chemotherapy to Evaluate Safety, Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Patients With FLT3 Mutated AML

    This study will evaluate the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of midostaurin in combination with standard chemotherapy in pediatrics patients with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated acute Myeloid Leukemia. the study has two parts : Part 1 to define the Recommended Phase 2 Dose, and the Part 2 to evaluate efficacy and safety of midostaurin. All patients will follow the same treatment regimen consisting in 2 Induction blocks, 3 consolidation blocks, 12 cycles of post-consolidation consisting of continuous therapy with midostaurin, and a follow-up phase.
    Location: Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

  • ONC201 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of ONC201 and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). ONC201 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, called brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 144 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients with Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III-IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Preventing Heart-Related Side Effects of Chemotherapy in Patients with Blood Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well dexrazoxane hydrochloride works in preventing heart-related side effects of chemotherapy in patients with blood cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myeloproliferative neoplasms. Chemoprotective drugs, such as dexrazoxane hydrochloride, may protect the heart from the side effects of drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, idarubicin, cytarabine, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin, in patients with blood cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas