Clinical Trials Using Daratumumab and Hyaluronidase-fihj

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Daratumumab and Hyaluronidase-fihj. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-2 of 2
  • Testing the Addition of a New Drug, Daratumumab / rHuPH20, to the Usual Treatment (Lenalidomide) as Post-stem Cell Transplant Treatment for Multiple Myeloma, DRAMMATIC Study

    This phase III trial compares the effect of usual treatment (lenalidomide) to using daratumumab / rHuPH20 plus the usual treatment after stem cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma. This drug combination may help patients live longer after their stem cell transplant. Another purpose of this study is to learn if the presence and amount of minimal residual disease (MRD) can help doctors predict when a patient’s multiple myeloma will get worse. MRD is the name for the small number of cancer cells that remain in the patient even after their multiple myeloma has been treated and they have no symptoms of the disease. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with daratumumab / rHuPH20, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving lenalidomide and daratumumab / rHuPH20 may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma compared to lenalidomide alone.
    Location: 510 locations

  • Testing the Use of Combination Therapy in Adult Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma, the EQUATE Trial

    This phase III trial compares the combination of four drugs (daratumumab, bortezomib, lenalidomide and dexamethasone) to the use of a three-drug combination (daratumumab, lenalidomide and dexamethasone) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Adding bortezomib to daratumumab, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may be more effective in shrinking the cancer or preventing it from returning, compared to continuing on a combination of daratumumab, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.
    Location: 180 locations