Clinical Trials Using Durvalumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Durvalumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 130

  • First Time in Human Study of AZD8701 With or Without Durvalumab in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumours

    The purpose of this study is to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Immunogenicity and Antitumor Activity of AZD8701 Alone and in Combination with Durvalumab (MEDI4736) in Adult Subjects with Select Advanced Solid Tumors
    Location: 2 locations

  • Phase III Study to Determine the Efficacy of Durvalumab in Combination With Chemotherapy in Completely Resected Stage II-III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    This is a Phase III, randomized, parallel-arm, placebo controlled, double blind, multicenter study assessing the efficacy and safety of durvalumab versus placebo following SoC chemotherapy in patients with completely resected stage II-III NSCLC who are MRD+ post surgery
    Location: 4 locations

  • DuRvalumab With chEmotherapy as First Line treAtment in Advanced Pleural Mesothelioma

    Patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) that cannot be surgically removed will receive first-line treatment with standard chemotherapy of pemetrexed and cisplatin. Two-thirds of the participants in the study will be randomly assigned to also receive a new treatment called durvalumab. Durvalumab is an antibody (a type of human protein) that works by blocking a body substance called Programmed Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1). Blocking PD-L1 helps the body's immune system attack cancer cells. Research has shown that durvalumab can slow tumor growth and shrink tumors in some people with cancer. Previous studies of combining durvalumab and chemotherapy showed that this combination is active in advanced mesothelioma. The purpose of this study is to see whether adding durvalumab to standard chemotherapy will improve overall survival (OS) in patients with MPM.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Durvalumab Long-Term Safety and Efficacy Study

    The aims of the study are to monitor the long-term safety of durvalumab, to provide continued treatment or retreatment with durvalumab to eligible patients, and to collect overall survival (OS) information.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab Treatment in Combination With Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab, Followed by Maintenance Durvalumab, Bevacizumab and Olaparib Treatment in Advanced Ovarian Cancer Patients.

    This is a Phase III randomised, double-blind, multi-centre study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of durvalumab in combination with standard of care platinum based chemotherapy and bevacizumab followed by maintenance durvalumab and bevacizumab or durvalumab, bevacizumab and olaparib in patients with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Durvalumab, MVA-BN-CV301, FPV Vaccine CV301, and Capecitabine with or without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Colorectal or Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect of durvalumab when given with modified vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic-CV301 (MVA-BN-CV301), FPV vaccine CV301, and capecitabine with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Giving booster vaccinations may make a stronger immune response and prevent or delay the recurrence of cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab may stop or slow colorectal or pancreatic tumors by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Given durvalumab, MVA-BN-CV301, FPV vaccine CV301, and capecitabine with or without bevacizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Gynecologic Cancer That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy in treating patients with gynecologic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with gynecologic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab and Radiation Therapy with or without Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trials studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab and radiation therapy with or without tremelimumab in treating patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether durvalumab and radiation therapy with or without tremelimumab will work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • DNA Vaccine with or without Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine with or without durvalumab in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer. Vaccines made from DNA may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express breast cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DNA vaccine with durvalumab may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Multimodality Therapy before and after Surgery in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well multimodality therapy works before and after surgery in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and durvalumab before surgery and using durvalumab with or without radiation therapy and cisplatin after surgery may kill more tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and tremelimumab work in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether durvalumab and tremelimumab in combination or sequential administration works better in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab as First Line Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the safety of durvalumab and how well it works as first line therapy in treating patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer. Drugs like durvalumab are designed to work with the immune system to help fight cancer cells against signals the tumor cells send to stop the immune system from working well. The durvalumab used in this study works to block this signal and to increase the immune response and may help the body build an effective immune response to kill lung cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Olaparib and Durvalumab with Carboplatin, Etoposide, and / or Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer, PRIO Trial

    This phase I / II trials investigates the side effects of olaparib and durvalumab and how well it works in combination with carboplatin, etoposide, and / or radiation therapy in treating patients with extensive stage-small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC) who have not received treatment for their disease. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy sources to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving olaparib and durvalumab together with carboplatin, etoposide, and / or radiation therapy may help treat patients with ES-SCLC.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab for the Treatment of Stage II-IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This clinical trial studies the effect of durvalumab and tremelimumab in treating patients with stage II-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer who have undergone surgical removal and completed after surgery treatment with or without radiation therapy and now have detectable tumor DNA in the blood. Durvalumab and tremelimumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving durvalumab and tremelimumab may help prevent cancer from returning (called cancer recurrence) when tumor DNA is detected in the blood.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Datopotamab Deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) in Combination With Durvalumab With or Without Platinum Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (TROPION-Lung04)

    This study will assess safety, tolerability, and treatment activity of datopotamab deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) in combination with durvalumab in participants with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • Durvalumab and Topotecan for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effects of durvalumab and topotecan in treating patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment with chemotherapy and immunotherapy (refractory). Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Topotecan may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth Giving durvalumab and topotecan may help kill more tumor cells and help patients live longer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Durvalumab for the Treatment of Patients with Stage IA2-III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer who Have Minimal Residual Disease

    This phase II trial studies the effect of durvalumab in treating patients with stage IA2-III non-small cell lung cancer who have positive minimal residual disease (MRD). Durvalumab is a checkpoint inhibitor and also known as immunotherapy. One of the ways tumors avoid being killed by the immune system is by expressing a protein on its surface called PD-L1, which interacts with PD-1 on the immune cell, and stops the immune cell from doing its job of killing the tumor. One of the most promising therapies involves activating the immune system to target and kill the cancer cells. Many cancers hide from the immune system by activating "checkpoints" like PD-L1 that the immune system uses to identify cells as normal cells. The immunotherapy treatments inhibit these checkpoints, allowing the immune system to target and kill cancer cells. Durvalumab targets PD-L1 and blocks the interaction of PD-1 and PD-L1, and essentially activate your immune system to target and kill the cancer cells. For patients with early stage disease, the backbone of therapy is surgery or radiation. Despite this, rates of disease coming back (relapse) after treatment of early stage disease remain high. Giving durvalumab after standard treatment may reduce the number of circulating cancer cells detected in the blood in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • A Phase 1b / 2 Study of T-DXd Combinations in HER2-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DESTINY-Breast07 will investigate the safety, tolerability, and anti-tumour activity of trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) in combination with other anti-cancer agents in patients with HER2-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • Olaparib (LYNPARZA) Plus Durvalumab (IMFINZI) in EGFR-Mutated Adenocarcinomas That Transform to Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) and Other Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Background: Lung cancers with EGFR mutations may develop resistance to therapies targeting this protein by evolving / being transformed into small cell or neuroendocrine cancers. There are no standard treatments for it. Researchers want to see if a new combination of drugs can help. Objective: To see if the combination of durvalumab and olaparib will cause tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who had EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) that was treated and now transformed to SCLC or another neuroendocrine tumor. Design: Participants will be screened under a separate protocol. They may have a tumor biopsy. Participants will have a physical exam. They will have a review of their symptoms, their medicines, and their ability to do their normal activities. They will have blood tests. They will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Participants will have a computed tomography (CT) scan, a series of x-rays taken of parts of the body. Participants will get durvalumab on Day 1 of each 28-day cycle. It is given through a small plastic tube that is put in an arm vein. They will take olaparib by mouth twice every day. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will take the study drugs until their disease gets worse or they have unacceptable side effects. About 30 days after they stop taking the study drugs, participants will have a follow-up visit. Then they will be contacted every 6 months for the rest of their life....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study of AZD4635 With Durvalumab and With Cabazitaxel and Durvalumab in Patients With mCRPC.

    This is a Phase II, international, open-label, two-arm, non-randomised study of AZD4635 in participants with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Acalabrutinib and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Primary or Secondary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    This phase I trial evaluates the best dose and side effects of acalabrutinib when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with primary or secondary central nervous system lymphoma. Acalabrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving acalabrutinib and durvalumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Brachytherapy with Durvalumab or Tremelimumab for the Treatment of Patients with Platinum-Resistant, Refractory, Recurrent, or Metastatic Gynecological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well brachytherapy with durvalumab or tremelimumab work for the treatment of gynecological malignancies that is resistant to platinum therapy (platinum-resistant), does not respond to treatment (refractory), has come back (recurrent), or has spread to other places in body (metastatic). Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see whether brachytherapy with durvalumab or tremelimumab works better in treating patients with gynecological malignancies.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Ph1b / 2 Study of the Safety and Efficacy of T-DXd Combinations in Advanced HER2+ Gastric Cancer (DESTINY-Gastric03)

    DESTINY-Gastric03 will investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and preliminary antitumor activity of trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) alone or in combination with chemotherapy and / or durvalumab in HER2-positive advanced / metastatic gastric / gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma patients. Study hypotheses: Combination of T-DXd with cytotoxic chemotherapy and / or durvalumab administered to subjects at the recommended phase 2 dose will show manageable safety and tolerability and preliminary anti-tumor efficacy so as to permit further clinical testing. T-DXd in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy or immune checkpoint inhibitor administered to HER2-positive gastric / GEJ cancer patients who have not received prior treatment for advanced / metastatic disease will show preliminary evidence of anti-tumour activity and the potential to become a therapeutic option for this patient population.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Sirolimus and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Stage I-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This trial studies the side effects of sirolimus and durvalumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Sirolimus is an oral medication that blocks the mTOR cellular pathway which may help the immune system work better. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sirolimus before durvalumab may help the immune system get rid of cancer.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Durvalumab and Olaparib for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Men Predicted to Have a High Neoantigen Load

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and olaparib work in treating prostate cancer in men predicted to have specific genetic mutations (a high neoantigen load). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Giving durvalumab and olaparib may kill more tumor cells in patients with prostate cancer predicted to have a high neoantigen load.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington