Clinical Trials Using Durvalumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Durvalumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 123

  • Multimodality Therapy before and after Surgery in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well multimodality therapy works before and after surgery in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and durvalumab before surgery and using durvalumab with or without radiation therapy and cisplatin after surgery may kill more tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Phase 1 / 2 Study of Combination Immunotherapy and mRNA Vaccine in Subjects With NSCLC

    This is an open-label multicenter 2-arm study to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of the addition of a vaccine therapy to 1 or 2 checkpoint inhibitors for NSCLC. Arm A: mRNA Vaccine [BI 1361849 (formerly CV9202)] + anti-PD-L1 [durvalumab] Arm B: mRNA Vaccine [BI 1361849] + anti-PD-L1 [durvalumab] + anti-CTLA-4 [tremelimumab] The run-in evaluation phase is followed by an expansion phase in which the cohort is expanded to 20 subjects (inclusive of subjects from the run-in).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with or without Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Stage I-IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase I / II trials studies how will stereotactic body radiation therapy with or without durvalumab work in treating patients with stage I-IIA non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether stereotactic body radiation therapy with or without durvalumab may work better in treating patients with stage I-IIA non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and tremelimumab work in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether give durvalumab and tremelimumab in combination or sequential administration works better in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Olaparib, Durvalumab, and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of olaparib when give together with durvalumab and tremelimumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutation that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Drugs, such as olaparib, may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and kill tumors cells with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving olaparib with durvalumab and tremelimumab may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Refractory Bladder Cancer Previously Treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab works in treating bladder cancer that did not respond to treatment with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic HER2 Negative Breast Cancer

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the anti-tumor activity of durvalumab in combination with tremelimumab in patients with metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Both durvalumab and tremelimumab are antibodies (proteins used by the immune system to fight infections and cancers). Durvalumab attaches to a protein in tumors called PD-L1. It may prevent cancer growth by helping certain blood cells of the immune system get rid of the tumor. Tremelimumab stimulates (wakes up) the immune system to attack the tumor by inhibiting a protein molecule called cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated 4 (CTLA-4) on immune cells. Combining the actions of these drugs may result in better treatment options for patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Atezolizumab and Tiragolumab Compared With Durvalumab in Participants With Locally Advanced, Unresectable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab in combination with tiragolumab compared with durvalumab in participants with locally advanced, unresectable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have received at least two cycles of concurrent platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and have not had radiographic disease progression.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Brachytherapy with Durvalumab or Tremelimumab for the Treatment of Patients with Platinum-Resistant, Refractory, Recurrent, or Metastatic Gynecological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well brachytherapy with durvalumab or tremelimumab work for the treatment of gynecological malignancies that is resistant to platinum therapy (platinum-resistant), does not respond to treatment (refractory), has come back (recurrent), or has spread to other places in body (metastatic). Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see whether brachytherapy with durvalumab or tremelimumab works better in treating patients with gynecological malignancies.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Durvalumab and Olaparib for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Men Predicted to Have a High Neoantigen Load

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and olaparib work in treating prostate cancer in men predicted to have specific genetic mutations (a high neoantigen load). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Giving durvalumab and olaparib may kill more tumor cells in patients with prostate cancer predicted to have a high neoantigen load.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Intermittent Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well intermittent checkpoint inhibitor therapy works in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Checkpoint inhibitors, such as pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, nivolumab, and avelumab, are drugs that work by helping the immune system recognize and kill cancer cells. This study is being done to find out whether intermittent checkpoint inhibitor therapy works the same, better, or worse than continued checkpoint inhibitor therapy in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Platinum-Based Chemotherapy and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Stage IIIB or IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well platinum-based chemotherapy works when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, and pemetrexed, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The purpose of this study is to find out if the combination of chemotherapy in combination with the immune therapy drug durvalumab would be efficacious and have an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Staggered Chemo-Immunotherapy (Pemetrexed and Carboplatin with Durvalumab) for the Treatment of Metastatic Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well staggered chemo-immunotherapy (pemetrexed and carboplatin with durvalumab) works in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as pemetrexed and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to compare different schedules of durvalumab in combination with pemetrexed and carboplatin in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Comparing Length of Treatment with Immunotherapy in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase III trial compares 1 year immunotherapy treatment versus continuous immunotherapy treatment beyond 1 year in patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy such as pembrolizumab, nivolumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab are drugs given through a vein to the entire body to activate the immune system. Comparing the treatment lengths may help doctors determine the ideal length of time for treatment with immunotherapy in patients with solid tumors.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Durvalumab Long-Term Safety and Efficacy Study

    The aims of the study are to monitor the long-term safety of durvalumab, to provide continued treatment or retreatment with durvalumab to eligible patients, and to collect overall survival (OS) information.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • A Study of Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Untreated Patients With Stage 3 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) That is Unable or Not Planned to be Removed by Surgery

    The primary purpose of the study is to compare the effectiveness of nivolumab plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by nivolumab plus ipilimumab (Arm A) vs CCRT followed by durvalumab (Arm C) in participants with untreated Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (LA NSCLC)
    Location: 2 locations

  • AVB-S6-500 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Platinum-Resistant or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This trial studies the side effects and best dose of AVB-S6-500 when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that is resistant to platinum therapy or has come back. Immunotherapy with AVB-S6-500 and durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Stage IIIA-B Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial investigates how well durvalumab works when given together with radiation therapy for the treatment of stage IIIA-B non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab combined with radiation therapy may help to control the disease in non-small cell lung cancer patients.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Durvalumab and MEDI0457 Vaccine for the Treatment of High-Risk HPV16-Positive Oropharynx Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and the MEDI0457 vaccine work in treating patients with high-risk HPV16-positive oropharynx cancer (a type of throat cancer). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vaccines made from HPV DNA, such as MEDI0457, may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Giving durvalumab with or without MEDI045, may eliminate human papillomavirus (HPV) in patients previously treated for HPV-positive oropharynx cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Combination with Platinum-based Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Patients with Untreated Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well durvalumab and tremelimumab given in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy work in treating patients with untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Extensive-stage small cell lung cancer is associated with aggressive biology and poor outcomes. Each study drug, durvalumab and tremelimumab, targets a different signal that may be stopping the body's immune system from killing the cancer. Durvalumab targets a signal on tumor cells and tremelimumab targets a signal on immune cells. It is hoped that by blocking these signals, the immune cells will once again be able to prevent or slow down cancer growth. Chemotherapy drugs such as carboplatin and etoposide, work in work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The information learned from the combination of immune boosting drugs may be identified as not excessively toxic and may be studied further to determine the benefit of using these as a therapy for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Durvalumab with or without Tremelimumab or Olaparib after Thoracic Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Extensive Stage-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and how well durvalumab with or without tremelimumab or olaparib works after thoracic radiation therapy in treating patients with extensive stage-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study is being done to find out if all / any of the combinations of study treatment following thoracic radiation therapy will improve 6-month progression-free survival compared with a similar historical control group.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Magnetic Resonance-Guided Hypofractionated Adaptive Radiation Therapy with Chemotherapy and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Inoperable Stage IIB, IIIA, and select IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of magnetic resonance-guided hypofractionated adaptive radiation therapy with chemotherapy and durvalumab, and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IIB, IIIA, and select IIIB non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be treated by surgery (inoperable). Magnetic resonance-guided adaptive radiation therapy uses a machine that contains both the device that delivers the radiation and a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. This allows the treatment team to adjust or re-plan treatment during the course of treatment. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving magnetic resonance-guided hypofractionated adaptive radiation therapy with chemotherapy and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to chemotherapy, durvalumab, and routine radiation therapy without magnetic resonance-guidance.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Durvalumab and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Variant Histology Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and chemotherapy before surgery in treating patients with variant histology bladder cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, cisplatin, gemcitabine, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab in addition to standard chemotherapy may lead to better outcomes in patients with variant histology bladder cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Somatically Hypermutated Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab works in combination with tremelimumab in treating patients with somatically hypermutated solid tumors that have come back or have not responded to treatment. Somatic hypermutation is a cellular mechanism that happens when the immune system adapts to a new foreign element (e.g. microbes). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving durvalumab with tremelimumab may work better in treating patients with somatically hypermutated solid tumors compared to standard treatment (chemotherapy, immunotherapy [using your immune system to treat your cancer] with other agents, or palliative care [no treatment]).
    Location: University of Kentucky / Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, Kentucky

  • Durvalumab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors, (DURVA+ study)

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to others places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, capecitabine, carboplatin, paclitaxel, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with durvalumab may improve how immune cells respond and attack tumor cells.
    Location: National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Clinic, Bethesda, Maryland