Clinical Trials Using Durvalumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Durvalumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 124

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Durvalumab and Proton Beam Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Stage IIA-IIIC Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, PARTICLE-D Study

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and proton beam radiation therapy in treating patients with stage IIA-IIIC non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Proton beam radiation therapy is a type of radiation therapy with a unique characteristic where the proton stops at a specific depth according to its energy. This may be advantageous in treating lung cancer because it allows for a sufficient tumor dose that may improve local control and survival while sparing normal organs at risk, such as the heart, lung, and spinal cord. Giving durvalumab together with proton beam radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to the usual treatment.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Olaparib and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II study assesses the efficacy of the combination of olaparib and durvalumab in the treatment of patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Olaparib may stop growth of tumors cells by inhibiting some of the enzymes (ADP ribose polymerase [PARP]) needed for cell growth. Durvalumab, a monoclonal antibody, inhibits the growth and spread of tumors by stimulating the patient's antitumor immune response. Giving olaparib and durvalumab together may provide an effective method to treat patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Novel Anti-cancer Agents in Patients With Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This study is designed to determine the efficacy and safety of durvalumab in combination with novel oncology therapies with or without paclitaxel and durvalumab + paclitaxel for first-line metastatic triple negative breast cancer
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • IPH5401 (Anti-C5aR) in Combination With Durvalumab in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation and dose-expansion study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, antitumor activity of IPH5401 (anti C5aR) in combination with Durvalumab (MEDI4736) in Adult Subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Liver Cancer Undergoing Drug-Eluting Bead Transarterial Chemoembolization

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and tremelimumab work in treating patients with liver cancer undergoing drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Durvalumab with or without Metformin in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well durvalumab given with or without metformin works in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Metformin, a drug typically used for the treatment of diabetes, may help to reduce the metabolic activity of cancer cells and of surrounding supportive tissues. It is not yet known whether giving durvalumab with or without metformin may work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Durvalumab with or without Tremelimumab before Surgery in Treating Participants with Human Papillomavirus Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Caner

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and how well stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery work in treating participants with human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery may work better, and cause fewer short and long-term side-effects, in participants with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Testing the Addition of an Individualized Vaccine to Nab-Paclitaxel, Durvalumab and Tremelimumab and Chemotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel, durvalumab, and tremelimumab with or without personalized synthetic long peptide vaccine (neoantigen vaccine) works in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving nab-paclitaxel, durvalumab, and tremelimumab with or without neoantigen vaccine will work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Yale University Cancer Center LAO, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Radiation Therapy and Durvalumab with or without Tremelimumab in Treating Participants with Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab work in treating participants with bladder cancer that cannot be removed by surgery, has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, or that has spread to other parts of the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab will work better in treating participants with bladder cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Selumetinib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of selumetinib and how well it works with durvalumab and tremelimumab in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer or that has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Selumetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab and selumetinib may work better in treating patients with non-small lung cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Safety and Efficacy of p53 Gene Therapy Combined With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Solid Tumors.

    This is a single arm Phase 2 study of the combination of adenoviral p53 (Ad-p53) gene therapy administered intra-tumorally with approved immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with recurrent or metastatic cancers. Comparison will be made to historical data. General safety and efficacy using RECIST 1.1 and Immune-Related Response Criteria as well as ECOG performance will be utilized.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Cabozantinib and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Gastroesophageal Cancer and Other Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with stage III-IV gastroesophageal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with gastroesophageal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies compared to cabozantinib or durvalumab alone.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab and Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab and hypofractionated radiation therapy in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and hypofractionated radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • DNA Plasmid-encoding Interleukin-12 / HPV DNA Plasmids Therapeutic Vaccine INO-3112 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Human Papillomavirus Associated Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab work in treating patients with human papillomavirus associated cancers that have come back or spread to other places in the body. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DNA plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / HPV DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with human papillomavirus associated cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • IRX-2 Regimen, Cyclophosphamide, and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of the IRX-2 regimen when given together with cyclophosphamide and durvalumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Many cancers in humans, including head and neck cancer, are associated with defects in the immune system. IRX-2 is a mixture of substances made by human cells stimulated in a laboratory to make these substances (proteins) that can “turn on” the immune system. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known if the IRX-2 regimen, cyclophosphamide, and durvalumab will work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy, Durvalumab, and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects of stereotactic body radiation therapy, durvalumab, and tremelimumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy, durvalumab, and tremelimumab may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Durvalumab and Vicinium in Subjects With High-Grade Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Previously Treated With Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

    Background: Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is in the early stages. But it usually comes back after treatment. The drugs Vicinium and Durvalumab may help the immune system find and destroy cancer cells. Objective: To test if the drugs Durvalumab and Vicinium together are safe and effective to treat people with bladder cancer that has not spread to the muscle in the bladder. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have bladder cancer that has not spread to the muscle in the bladder and was treated unsuccessfully with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Tumor sample from previous surgery. If one is not available, they will have a biopsy: A small piece of tumor is removed. Cystoscopy to examine the inside of the bladder. This may include a biopsy or removing tumors. CT or MRI: They lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. Electrocardiogram to test heart function Participants will receive Durvalumab and Vicinium in 2 phases: First phase: Durvalumab every 4 weeks and Vicinium once a week for 3 months Second phase: Durvalumab every 4 weeks and Vicinium once every other week Participants will have tumor samples taken every 3 months. They will have blood and urine tests throughout the study. Participants will continue treatment for up to 2 years. Participants will have a visit about 30 days after their last treatment. This includes blood and urine tests. It may include a cytoscopy or additional biopsies.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Olaparib with or without Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib with or without durvalumab work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving olaparib with durvalumab may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Study of Durvalumab + Tremelimumab With Chemotherapy or Durvalumab With Chemotherapy or Chemotherapy Alone for Patients With Lung Cancer (POSEIDON).

    This is a randomized, open-label, multi-center, global, Phase III study to determine the efficacy and safety of durvalumab + tremelimumab combination therapy + Standard of care (SoC) chemotherapy or durvalumab monotherapy + SoC chemotherapy versus SoC chemotherapy alone as first line treatment in patients with metastatic non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with tumors that lack activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Durvalumab, Pralatrexate, Romidepsin, and Oral Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab, pralatrexate, romidepsin, and oral azacitidine, and to see how well they work in treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Pralatrexate is a chemotherapy drug that blocks how cells are made and therefore the growth of cancer cells can be slowed, stopped, or decreased. Romidepsin is another type of chemotherapy known as HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitors, which blocks the function of enzymes that help remove the acetyl groups from various proteins in cells. HDAC inhibitors help stop the growth of cancer cells and can help kill the cancer cells. Oral azacitidine prevents the body from making deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) that cells need to grow, which stops the growth of cancer cells and causes them to die. It is not yet known which combination of these drugs work best in treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with High Risk Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating participants with high risk soft-tissue sarcoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy may work better at treating high risk soft-tissue sarcoma.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Study of Durvalumab (MEDI4736) After Chemo-Radiation for Microsatellite Stable Stage II-IV Rectal Cancer

    This study is being done to look at the safety and response to the investigational drug durvalumab (MEDI4736) following chemo-radiation therapy for patients with MSS stage II to IV rectal cancer. Durvalumab recognizes specific proteins on the surface of cancer cells and triggers the immune system to destroy the cancer cells. The chemoRT portion of the treatment will be completed just before the course of durvalumab is initiated. In order to learn more about certain characteristics of rectal cancer tumors, this study includes special research tests using samples from diagnostic tumors, a tissue sample from tumors removed during surgery, fresh tumor samples from an area where the cancer has recurred, and blood samples.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Azacitidine, Durvalumab, and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of azacitidine when given together with durvalumab and tremelimumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving azacitidine, durvalumab, and tremelimumab may work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Durvalumab with or without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Cutaneous or Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of durvalumab and to see how well it works with or without lenalidomide in treating patients with cutaneous or peripheral T cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab and lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with cutaneous or peripheral T cell lymphoma.
    Location: 4 locations