Clinical Trials Using Epacadostat

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Epacadostat. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • Epacadostat and Sirolimus in Treating Participants with Advanced Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of epacadostat and sirolimus in treating participants with cancer that has spread to other places in the. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as sirolimus, is used to decrease the body’s immune response and may increase blood cell count. Giving epacadostat and sirolimus may work better at treating advanced cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of Retifanlimab (INCMGA00012) Alone or in Combination With Other Therapies in Participants With Advanced or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer Who Have Progressed on or After Platinum-based Chemotherapy.

    This is a multicenter, open-label, nonrandomized, Phase 2 umbrella study of retifanlimab in participants who have advanced or metastatic endometrial cancer that has progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. retifanlimab will be administered as monotherapy or in combination with other immunotherapy or targeted agents.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Tavokinogene Telseplasmid with Electroporation, Pembrolizumab, and Epacadostat in Treating Patients with Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    This phase II trial studies how well tavokinogene telseplasmid with electroporation, pembrolizumab, and epacadostat work in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Tavokinogene telseplasmid with electroporation is a gene therapy that may delay of tumor growth and which may have less toxicity than other methods of gene delivery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving tavokinogene telseplasmid with electroporation, pembrolizumab, and epacadostat may work better in treating squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
    Location: 2 locations

  • INCMGA0012, Bevacizumab, and Radiation Therapy with or without Epacadostat for the Treatment of Patients with Recurrent Gliomas

    This phase II trial studies how well INCMGA00012, bevacizumab, and radiation therapy with or without epacadostat work for the treatment of gliomas that have come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as INCMGA00012, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving INCMGA00012, bevacizumab, and radiation therapy with epacadostat may work better in treating patients with glioma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Epacadostat with Standard Chemoradiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of epacadostat when given together with standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation) before surgery in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissues and lymph nodes (locally advanced). Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving epacadostat in addition to standard chemoradiation before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Phase I / II Study of Immunotherapy Combination BN-Brachyury Vaccine, M7824, ALT-803 and Epacadostat (QuEST1)

    Background: Immunotherapy drugs help the body to fight cancer. Scientists think that combining some of these drugs will make them work better than when used alone. This may be true for many types of cancer, including castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Objective: To test if the combination of the drugs BN-brachyury, M7824, ALT-803, and Epacadostat is safe and shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with CRPC or another metastatic cancer Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - CT or MRI scans - Possible bone imaging - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Possible tumor biopsy Participants will be treated with a 2-, 3- or 4-drug combinations of the following study drugs in 2-week cycles: - Participants will receive M7824 by IV once every 2 weeks. - Participants will receive ALT-803 by injection once every 2 weeks. They will record any skin changes at the injection site in a diary. - Participants will receive BN-brachyury as 4 injections to different limbs. They will get the first 3 doses 2 weeks apart. Then they will get doses every 4 weeks for 6 months, then every 3 months for 2 years, then every 6 months. - Participants will take Epacadostat orally every 12 hours. They will keep a pill diary. Participants will have physical exams and blood and urine tests at the start of each cycle. They may have scans every 12 weeks. Participants will continue treatment until their disease gets worse or they cannot tolerate the side effects. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4-5 weeks after they stop treatment. They will have a physical exam and blood tests. They may be asked to return for scans every 3 months. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Epacadostat in Treating Patients with Resectable Solid Tumors

    This phase Ib trial studies how epacadostat reacts in the body and how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors that can be removed by surgery. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Epacadostat, Pembrolizumab, and CRS-207 with or without Cyclophosphamide and a Vaccine (GVAX Pancreas Vaccine) in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of epacadostat and to see how well it works when given together with pembrolizumab and CRS-207 with or without cyclophosphamide and GVAX pancreas vaccine in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. CRS-207 may cause the immune system to attack cells with mesothelin, which may then kill cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Proteins in GVAX pancreas vaccine may help to activate the immune system cells (the body’s system to fight infection or disease) to recognize and attack cancer cells. It is not yet known whether given epacadostat, pembrolizumab, and CRS-207 with cyclophosphamide and GVAX pancreas vaccine works better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Combination Study of SV-BR-1-GM in Combination With INCMGA00012 and Epacadostat

    This is an open-label study of Study WRI-GEV-007, which evaluates SV-BR-1-GM in metastatic or locally recurrent breast cancer patients, in combination with the PD-1 inhibitor INCMGA00012 and the IDO inhibitor epacadostat. Patients who with advanced breast cancer who have failed prior therapies will be eligible to enroll in this study. The study will evaluate SV-BR-1-GM in combination with INCMGA00012 and epacadostat. Treatment cycles will be every 3 weeks with evaluations for tumor progression or response every 6-12 weeks.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida