Clinical Trials Using Etoposide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Etoposide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 101-119 of 119

  • Treatment and Natural History Study of Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    This study will evaluate the response and long-term effects of alpha-interferon in patients with lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG). The disease causes proliferation of destructive cells involving the lungs, skin, kidneys, and central nervous system. Patients ages 12 and older who have LYG and who are not pregnant or breast feeding may be eligible for this study. Alpha interferon or chemotherapy, or both, will be used. Alpha interferon is a protein the body naturally produces. If patients have grade 3 disease, they will usually receive EPOCH-rituximab (EPOCH-R) chemotherapy (each letter representing a drug). If patients have grade 1 or 2 disease, the will usually receive alpha interferon. If patients have LYG after receiving alpha interferon and / or EPOCH-R, they may receive rituximab alone or with alpha interferon. Rituximab is an antibody, binding to a specific molecule (CD20) present on most B-cell lymphomas. Doses of several drugs in EPOCH-R may be increased if patients tolerated them in the previous cycle. If patients respond to EPOCH-R but still have low grade LYG, they may receive alpha interferon. Researchers will also try to obtain a biopsy of patients lesions, to help in understanding the disease. Patients self-administer alpha interferon by injection under the skin three times weekly. They will visit the clinic every 2 to 12 weeks for follow-up. Patients will receive alpha interferon for 1 year after LYG goes away, depending on response. EPOCH-R has these drugs: rituximab by vein on Day 1; prednisone by mouth on Days 1 to 5; etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine as a continuous intravenous infusion on Days 1 to 5; and cyclophosphamide by intravenous injection over 1 hour on Day 5. Each cycle lasts 3 weeks: 5 days of chemotherapy and 16 days of no chemotherapy. Etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine are infused through a small pump worn by patients. The drugs are given over 5 days through a central intravenous catheter. There are two cycles of EPOCH-R beyond a maximum response, with six cycles minimum. To reduce harm to bone marrow, patients receive granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), self-administered by injection under the skin daily for approximately 10 days between chemotherapy cycles. If at the end of therapy, patients have a complete response, treatment will stop. If there is residual low grade disease, patients may receive alpha interferon. Alpha interferon can have flu-like side effects of headache, fever, chills, and body aches. EPOCH-R drugs can cause gastrointestinal problems, hair loss, and weakness. G-CSF can cause bone pain, body aches, and hair thinning. Chemotherapy can cause some patients to develop leukemia. This study may or may not have a direct benefit for participants. It is not certain whether the new therapy will help decrease tumors. However, knowledge gained may improve the understanding of and treatment for LYG. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Eflornithine (DFMO) and Etoposide for Relapsed / Refractory Neuroblastoma

    Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) will be used in an open label, multicenter, study in combination with etoposide for subjects with relapsed / refractory neuroblastoma.
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Study of BGB-A1217 in Combination With Tislelizumab in Advanced Solid Tumors

    The primary objectives of this study are: to assess the safety and tolerability, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of BGB-A1217 in combination with tislelizumab in participants with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Best Available Therapy Versus Autologous Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Sclerosis (BEAT-MS)

    This is a multi-center prospective rater-masked (blinded) randomized controlled trial of 156 participants, comparing the treatment strategy of Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) to the treatment strategy of Best Available Therapy (BAT) for treatment-resistant relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants will be randomized at a 1 to 1 (1:1) ratio. All participants will be followed for 72 months after randomization (Day 0, Visit 0).
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Global Study of Midostaurin in Combination With Chemotherapy to Evaluate Safety, Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Patients With FLT3 Mutated AML

    This study will evaluate the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of midostaurin in combination with standard chemotherapy in pediatrics patients with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated acute Myeloid Leukemia. the study has two parts : Part 1 to define the Recommended Phase 2 Dose, and the Part 2 to evaluate efficacy and safety of midostaurin. All patients will follow the same treatment regimen consisting in 2 Induction blocks, 3 consolidation blocks, 12 cycles of post-consolidation consisting of continuous therapy with midostaurin, and a follow-up phase.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Use of High Dose Radiation Followed by Chemotherapy and Radiation to Treat Locally Advanced NSCLC

    This is a single-arm, single-stage Phase II study designed to evaluate the 1-year PFS rate in subjects with locally-advanced NSCLC (stage II / III) and treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) followed by concurrent mediastinal chemoradiation with or without consolidation chemotherapy. A total of 60 subjects will be enrolled to this study over a 4 year accrual period.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Obinutuzumab and ICE Chemotherapy in Refractory / Recurrent CD20+ Mature NHL

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety of administering obinutuzumab as a single agent alone and in combination with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) chemotherapy and determine the response rate of this treatment for children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA) with relapsed CD20 positive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL).
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Chemo-Immunotherapy Followed by Durvalumab and Ceralasertib in Treatment Naïve Patients With Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The primary objective of this single arm study is to estimate the progression free survival of previously-untreated patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer. Patients will receive initial chemo-immunotherapy followed by maintenance therapy with durvalumab and oral ceralasertib.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Polatuzumab Vedotin, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide (PolaR-ICE) as Initial Salvage Therapy for the Treatment of Relapsed / Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the effect of polatuzumab vedotin, rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide as initial salvage therapy in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Polatuzumab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, polatuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Polatuzumab attaches to CD79b positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with immunotherapy may kill more cancer cells in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • LB-100, Carboplatin, Etoposide, and Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Untreated Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of LB-100 when given together with carboplatin, etoposide, and atezolizumab for the treatment of untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Drugs such as carboplatin and etoposide work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. LB‐100 has been shown to make anticancer drugs (chemotherapy) work better at killing cancer. LB‐100 blocks a protein on the surface of cells called PP2A. Blocking this protein makes the tumor cells that express PP2A divide. This allows standard chemotherapy drugs such as carboplatin, etoposide, and atezolizumab work better at killing the tumor cells since these drugs work best at destroying cells that are dividing. Giving LB-100 in combination with standard chemotherapy drugs may work better to treat extensive-stage small cell lung cancer compared to standard chemotherapy drugs alone.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Sirolimus and Metronomic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk Solid Tumors in Children, AflacST1903 Study

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus together with repetitive, low doses of chemotherapy (metronomic chemotherapy) works in treating children with high-risk solid tumors. Sirolimus is used to decrease the body's immune response. Chemotherapy drugs, such as etoposide and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving sirolimus together with chemotherapy may help stop tumor growth by preventing blood from getting to the tumor and ultimately prevent the tumor from coming back.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • ADMIRAL Trial: Adaptive Mediastinal Radiation with Chemo-Immunotherapy

    This phase II trial studies two questions in patients with stage III NSCLC: 1) does it improve cancer control to add the drug Durvalumab, a type of immunotherapy, earlier in the treatment course; and 2) by intensifying treatment with durvalumab, is it possible to avoid mediastinal radiation to decrease side effects, without decreasing cancer control?
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
    Location: 141 locations

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, called brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 142 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide and Abatacept for the Treatment of Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Hematologic Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide and abatacept work in reducing the incidence of moderate and severe chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following donor stem cell transplantation in patients with hematologic (blood) cancers. GVHD occurs when the cells from the donor (the graft) see the body's cells (the host) as different and attack them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as abatacept, is used to decrease the body’s immune response. The combination of cyclophosphamide and abatacept following donor stem cell transplantation may work better in reducing the incidence of moderate and severe chronic GVHD compared to standard of care.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Human Lysozyme Goat Milk for the Prevention of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of human lysozyme goat milk in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can cause an immune response against the body's own normal cells (call graft versus host disease). The goat milk in the study is from goats that have been genetically engineered to produce human lysozyme in the milk. Human lysozyme is a natural enzyme found in human milk and acts as an antimicrobial. Lysozyme is key to the digestive health of breast-fed human infants, since it helps the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and reduces the growth of bacteria that causes diarrhea and intestinal disease. Giving human lysozyme goat milk may reduce the rate of graft versus host disease in blood cancer patients undergoing a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Standard Chemotherapy vs. Chemotherapy Guided by Cancer Stem Cell Test in Recurrent Glioblastoma

    The purpose of this clinical study is to confirm the utility of chemosensitivity tumor testing on cancer stem cells (ChemoID) as a predictor of clinical response in poor prognosis malignant brain tumors such as recurrent glioblastoma (GBM).
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania