Clinical Trials Using Fludarabine Phosphate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludarabine Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 136

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Hematologic Malignancies or Myelodysplasia

    This phase I / II trial studies how well stem cell transplant from partially matched related donors works in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or myelodysplasia. Donor stem cell transplant is a procedure in which a patient receives blood-forming stem cells (cells from which all blood cells develop) from a genetically similar, but not identical, donor. Ideally, patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant receive a stem cell graft from a matched sibling; however, less than 30% of patients will have such a donor. There is a high likelihood of being unable to identify a perfect matched unrelated donor. Stem cell transplant from a partially matched related donor may result in result in successful engraftment and rapid immune rebuilding while maintaining a low risk of graft versus host disease.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and donor blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and filgrastim work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Anti-CD19-ARTEMIS T Cells, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Participants with CD19+ Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of anti-CD19-ARTEMIS T cells when given together with fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide in treating participants with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that has come back or isn't responding to treatment. In engineered T-cell therapy, T cells (part of the immune system) are removed from the body and genetically modified in a laboratory before being transferred back into the participant. These modified cells (anti-CD19-ARTEMIS T cells) may be better able to recognize and kill cancer cells by targeting a protein on the cancer cell surface called CD19 (found on tumor cells and on normal antibody producing cells). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving Anti-CD19-ARTEMIS T cells together with fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide may work better in treating participants with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • HERV-E TCR Transduced CD8+ / CD34+ T-cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of HERV-E TCR transduced CD8+ / CD34+ T-cells in treating patients with clear cell renal cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body. HERV-E is a viral molecule of the HERVs family that becomes active in cancer cells and has been found in the surface of kidney tumor cells (not in healthy human normal cells). The incorporation of HERV-E into lymphocytes (T cells) may enable the immune system to recognize and fight kidney cancer cells.
    Location: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Thiotepa, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well thiotepa, fludarabine phosphate, and melphalan hydrochloride work in treating patients with blood cancer who are undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as thiotepa, fludarabine phosphate, and melphalan hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Nivolumab, Ipilimumab, and Immunotransplant in Treating Participants with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects of nivolumab, ipilimumab, and immunotransplant and to see how well they work in treating participants with diffuse large B cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or that isn't responding to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Immunotransplant is a treatment used to help the immune system fight diseases such as cancer. T cells are collected from a participant and then given back to the participant after "lymphodepleting" chemotherapy which helps the anti-tumor immune T cells preferentially expand to target and eliminate tumor cells. Giving ipilimumab and nivolumab with immunotransplant may help treat participants with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • A Phase I / II Study to Evaluate the Safety of Cellular Immunotherapy Using Autologous T Cells Engineered to Express a CD20-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor for Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    The purpose of this research is to find the best dose of genetically modified T-cells, to study the safety of this treatment, and to see how well it works in treating patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or did not respond to previous treatment (refractory).
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Autologous CD19 / CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of autologous CD19 / CD22 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how well they work in treating patients with CD19 positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. A CAR is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells (T cells) can attack cancer cells by recognizing and responding to the CD19 / CD22 proteins. These proteins are commonly found on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving autologous CD19 / CD22 chimeric antigen receptor T-cells and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Venetoclax with Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of venetoclax and how well it works when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim and idarubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax together with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ex-Vivo Expanded and Activated Donor NK Cells and Hu14.18-IL2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Expanded and activated donor NK cells may be able to kill the cancer cells better. Hu14.18-IL2 binds to NK cells and may be able to activate them, improving their ability to stay alive, multiply, and kill cancer cells. Giving ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 may work better in treating patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • 211^At-BC8-B10 before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Mixed-Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of 211^astatine(At)-BC8-B10 before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or mixed-phenotype acute leukemia. Radioactive substances, such as astatine-211, linked to monoclonal antibodies, such as BC8, can bind to cancer cells and give off radiation which may help kill cancer cells and have less of an effect on healthy cells before donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Haploidentical Stem Cell Selection using Miltenyi CliniMACS CD34 Reagent System in Treating Participants with High-Risk Hematologic Disorders

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well haploidentical stem cells selected using Miltenyi CliniMACS CD34 reagent system works in treating participants with high-risk hematologic disorders. Stem cells selected using Miltenyi CliniMACS CD34 reagent system from a half-matched donor, may increase the number of cells given to participants during stem cell transplantation in combination with umbilical cord blood transplantation.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Donor Nicotinamide Expanded-Natural Killer Cells Followed by IL-2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma or CD20 Positive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of donor nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells followed by IL-2 in treating patients with multiple myeloma or CD20 positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells may improve the natural killer cell cancer killing ability and improve their ability to home into the tumor cells. Interleukins such as IL-2, are proteins made by white blood cells and other cells in the body and may help regulate immune response. Giving nicotinamide expanded-natural killer cells followed by IL-2 may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Autologous IC9-CAR19 T cells in Treating Patients with Recurrent Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effect of autologous inducible caspase 9 chimeric antigen receptor targeting CD19 antigen (iC9-CAR19) T cells in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back. IC9-CAR19 T cells combines antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are proteins that protect the body from disease caused by bacteria or toxic substances and by stopping them from growing. T cells are special infection fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cancer cells or cells that are infected.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity conditioning (a short course of chemotherapy) and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving reduced intensity conditioning and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells with shorter recovery and fewer side effects.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Engineered Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of engineered donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Using T cells specially selected from donor blood in the laboratory for transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Chemotherapy Given before and after Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelofibrosis

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate when given together with chemotherapy before and after a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib phosphate together with chemotherapy before and after a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, Rabbit Anti-thymocyte Globulin, Tacrolimus, and Methotrexate in Treating Participants with Blood Cancer Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This pilot early phase I trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, and methotrexate work in treating participants with blood cancer undergoing stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, and methotrexate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin and tacrolimus may be an effective treatment for lowering the incidence of graft-versus-host disease caused by a transplant. Giving fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, and methotrexate may work better in treating participants with blood cancer.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

  • Universal Donor Natural Killer Cells and ALT-803 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Blood Cancer, Colon / Rectal Cancer, or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of universal donor natural killer cells when given together with superagonist interleukin-15:interleukin-15 receptor alphaSu / Fc fusion complex ALT-803 (ALT-803) in treating patients with blood cancer, colon / rectal cancer, or soft tissue sarcoma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Natural killer cells are a type of white blood cell that may kill tumor cells. ALT-803 may enhance natural killer cell survival and enable them to increase in number after infusion. Giving natural killer cells and ALT-803 may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Partially HLA-Mismatched Related Donor Stem Cell Transplant Using Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Based Donor Selection in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donor stem cell transplant using killer immunoglobulin receptor or HLA based donor selection works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Partially mismatched donor stem cells may reduce the risk of cancer recurring after transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effect of busulfan, fludarabine phosphate, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide in treating patients with blood cancer undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy such as busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, Donor Bone Marrow Transplant, and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Treating Patients with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy work in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Giving immunosuppressive therapy, such as tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy may work better in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cytokine-induced killer cells after donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cytokine-induced killer cells after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri