Clinical Trials Using Fludarabine Phosphate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludarabine Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 140

  • Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effect of busulfan, fludarabine phosphate, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide in treating patients with blood cancer undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy such as busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, Donor Bone Marrow Transplant, and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Treating Patients with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy work in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Giving immunosuppressive therapy, such as tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy may work better in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cytokine-induced killer cells after donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cytokine-induced killer cells after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Gene-Modified T Cells, Vaccine Therapy, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing NY-ESO-1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nivolumab when given together with gene-modified T cells and vaccine therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that express the cancer-testes antigen NY-ESO-1 gene AND have spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or distant organs (stage IV). T cells are a special type of white blood cells (immune cell) that have the ability to kill cancer cells. Nivolumab may block PD-1 which is found on T cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Placing a modified gene for the NY-ESO-1 T cell receptor (TCR) into the patients' T cells in the laboratory and then giving them back to the patient may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1. Dendritic cells are another type of blood cell that can teach other cells in the body to look for cancer cells and attack them. Giving a dendritic cell vaccine with the NY-ESO-1 protein may help dendritic cells teach the immune system to target cancer cells expressing that protein, and further help the T cells attack cancer. Giving nivolumab together with gene-modified T-cells and dendritic cell vaccine may teach the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells that express NY-ESO-1.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Anti-ESO (cancer / test antigen) mTCR-transduced Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Cancer That Expresses NY-ESO-1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of anti-ESO (cancer / test antigen) murine T-cell receptor (mTCR)-transduced autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate in treating patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and expresses the gene NY-ESO-1. Donor white blood cells that are treated in the laboratory with anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)3 may help treat metastatic cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells, including natural killer cells, to kill metastatic cancer cells. Giving anti-ESO (cancer / test antigen) mTCR-transduced autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes together with combination chemotherapy and aldesleukin may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • Early Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

    This clinical trial studies how well early stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Early stem cell transplantation may result in more successful treatment for patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Personalized NK Cell Therapy after Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1 / x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2 / C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation with or without Anti-Thymocyte Globulin before Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total-body irradiation with or without anti-thymocyte globulin before donor umbilical cord blood transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with hematologic cancer. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • JCAR014 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase Ib trial studies whether anti-CD19-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) lentiviral vector-transduced autologous T cells (JCAR014) and durvalumab are safe in combination and can work together in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). JCAR014 is made of each patient's immune cells (T cells) that have a new gene added to them in a laboratory, which programs them to kill lymphoma cells. Durvalumab is a type of drug called a monoclonal antibody, targeted to PD-L1 that may help immune cells attack cancer cells more effectively and thus help JCAR014 work better.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Ibrutinib, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Obinutuzumab in Treating Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib, fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and obinutuzumab work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib, fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and obinutuzumab together may work better in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Myeloablative or Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimen in Treating Patients with High-Risk, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well a myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is high-risk, has come back, or does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy (myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimen) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus or cyclosporine after the transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens given before the transplant will work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This clinical trial studies the use of reduced intensity chemotherapy and radiation therapy before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low doses of chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Reducing the intensity of the chemotherapy and radiation may also reduce the side effects of the donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Romidepsin in Conditioning and Maintenance in Patients with T-cell Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before donor stem cell transplant (SCT) (conditioning) and alone after SCT (maintenance) in treating patients with T-cell leukemia or lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, busulfan, and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate may help prevent the patient's body from rejecting transplanted cells, and help kill any cancer cells that are in the body. Maintenance romidepsin may keep the cancer cells from coming back after the transplant.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Intensity Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan in Treating Patients with Relapsed Hematologic Cancers Undergoing a Second or above Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of intensity modulated total marrow irradiation (IMTMI) when given together with fludarabine phosphate and melphalan in treating patients with cancers of the blood (hematologic) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) undergoing a second or above donor stem cell transplant. IMTMI is a type of radiation therapy to the bone marrow that may be less toxic and may also reduce the chances of cancer to return. Giving fludarabine phosphate, melphalan, and IMTMI before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • JAK Inhibitor before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with myelofibrosis that developed without another condition (primary) or evolved from other bone marrow disorders (secondary). JAK inhibitors are a class of drugs that may stop the growth of abnormal cells by blocking an enzyme needed for cell growth. Giving a JAK inhibitor such as ruxolitinib before a donor stem cell transplant may help reduce symptoms of myelofibrosis such as inflammation and enlargement of the spleen, improve the patient’s general physical condition, and prevent complications from occurring after the transplant. Infusing healthy stem cells from a donor into the patient may help the patient's bone marrow work normally and make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant may help improve transplant outcomes in patients with myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Venetoclax and Sequential Busulfan, Cladribine, and Fludarabine Phosphate before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well venetoclax and sequential busulfan, cladribine, and fludarabine phosphate before donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Hematological Diseases

    This phase II trial studies donor stem cell transplant followed by cyclophosphamide in treating patients with hematological diseases. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells, called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Intra-osseous Donor Umbilical Cord Blood and Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Co-transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This clinical trial studies intra-osseous donor umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stromal cell co-transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a co-transplant of donor umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stromal cells into the bone (intra-osseous) helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil at the time of transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Nonmyeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and how well lower dose (nonmyeloablative) peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related donor, that closely match the patient's blood, are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of genetically modified T-cells after lymphodepleting chemotherapy in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm that has returned after a period of improvement or has not responded to previous treatment. An immune cell is a type of blood cell that can recognize and kill abnormal cells in the body. The immune cell product will be made from patient or patient's donor (related or unrelated) blood cells. The immune cells are changed by inserting additional pieces of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (genetic material) into the cell to make it recognize and kill cancer cells. Placing a modified gene into white blood cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Cellular Immunotherapy following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cellular immunotherapy following chemotherapy in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia that has come back. Placing a modified gene into white blood cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • HSCT for Patients With Fanconi Anemia Using Risk-Adjusted Chemotherapy

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of lower doses of busulfan and the elimination of cyclosporine will further reduce transplant-related side effects for patients with Fanconi Anemia (FA). Patients will undergo a transplant utilizing mis-matched related or matched unrelated donors following a preparative regimen of busulfan, fludarabine, anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclophosphamide.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Immunotherapy Following Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Poor Risk CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    Patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma who are CD30+ will receive a standard of care reduced intensity regimen and an allogeneic stem cell transplant (from another person, related or unrelated). Following recovery, patients will receive a medication called Brentuximab Vendotin which is targeted against CD30+ cells. The study hypothesis is that this treatment will be safe and well tolerated in children and young adults.
    Location: 2 locations