Clinical Trials Using Fludeoxyglucose F-18

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludeoxyglucose F-18. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 46
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  • Pembrolizumab and Involved Site Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Early Stage Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and involved site radiation therapy works in treating patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Involved site radiotherapy is a more targeted form of radiation therapy which uses imaging studies such as computerized tomography and positron emission tomography scans to limit the dose and field of radiation administered in order to limit undesirable side effects. Giving pembrolizumab and involved site radiation therapy may improve the ability of T cells to recognize and fight off cancer cells.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Radiation Therapy, and FDG-PET / CT in Treating Patients with P16 or HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    The purpose of this phase II trial is to see if pre-treatment and mid-treatment positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) can be used to guide the amount of radiation therapy given in combination with chemotherapy to patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) related squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Diagnostic procedures, such as PET / CT, uses radioactive material, such as fludeoxyglucose F-18 (FDG), injected into the blood to show the internal workings of the body and may help the doctors understand the exact location of the disease. Giving carboplatin, paclitaxel, radiation therapy, and FDG-PET / CT may work better in treating patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • FLARE RT for Patients with Stage IIB-IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Personalizing Radiation Therapy Using PET / CT and SPECT / CT Imaging

    This phase II trial studies how well positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) and single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT) / CT imaging works in improving radiation therapy treatment in patients with stage IIB-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. PET / CT imaging mid-way through treatment may be able to accurately show how well radiation therapy and chemotherapy are working. SPECT / CT imaging may be able to tell which parts of the lung tissue are healthier than others. Based on the result of the imaging, treatment adjustments may be made to the radiation therapy to improve survival and decrease toxicity.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Image-Guided Cryoablation in Treating Patients with Head, Neck, and Spine Tumors

    This phase I clinical trial studies image-guided cryosurgery in treating patients with head, neck, and spine tumors. Cryoablation, also known as cryosurgery, is a procedure in which an extremely cold liquid or an instrument called a cryoprobe is used to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue. Cryoablation may shrink the tumor, reduce pain, and improve quality of life in patients with head, neck, and spine tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • 18F-FDG PET and Osimertinib in Evaluating Glucose Utilization in Patients with EGFR Activated Recurrent Glioblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well fludeoxyglucose F-18 (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and osimertinib works in evaluating glucose utilization in patients with EGFR activated recurrent glioblastoma. Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. 18F-FDG PET imaging may help to detect changes in tumor glucose utilization, which may allow investigators to obtain an early read out on the impact of osimertinib on recurrent glioblastoma patients whose tumors have EGFR activation.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Fluorine F 18 Fluorthanatrace PET / CT in Treating Patients with Primary or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well fluorine F 18 fluorthanatrace positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) works in treating patients ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that is primary or has come back. Fluorine F 18 fluorthanatrace is a radioactive tracer, a type of imaging agent that is labeled with a radioactive tag and injected into the body to help with imaging scans. PET / CT uses a scanner to make detailed, computerized pictures of areas inside the body. PET / CT with Fluorine F 18 fluorthanatrace may allow more tumor cells to be found in patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Lu-177-DOTATATE (Lutathera) in Therapy of Inoperable Pheochromocytoma / Paraganglioma

    Background: Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma are rare tumors. They usually form inside and near the adrenal gland or in the neck region. Not all these tumors can be removed with surgery, and there are no good treatments if the disease has spread. Researchers think a new drug may be able to help. Objective: To learn the safety and tolerability of Lu-177-DOTATATE. Also, to see if it improves the length of time it takes for the cancer to return. Eligibility: Adults who have an inoperable tumor of the study cancer that can be detected with Ga-68-DOTATATE PET / CT imaging Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history, physical exam, and blood tests. Eligible participants will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center. Participants will get the study drug in an intravenous infusion. They will get 4 doses, given about 8 weeks apart. Between 4 and 24 hours after each study drug dose, participants will have scans taken. They will lie on their back on a scanner table. Participants will have vital signs taken. They will give blood and urine samples. During the study, participants will have other scans taken. Some scans will use a radioactive tracer. Participants will complete quality of life questionnaires. Participants will be contacted by phone 1-3 days after they leave the Clinical Center. They will then be followed every 3 to 6 months for 3 years or until their disease gets worse.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Liver Metastases

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of stereotactic radiation therapy in treating patients with liver metastases. Stereotactic radiation therapy may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Lu-177-DOTATATE (Lutathera) in Combination With Olaparib in Inoperable Gastroenteropancreatico Neuroendocrine Tumors (GEP-NET)

    Background: A neuroendocrine tumor is a rare type of tumor. It comes from body cells called neuroendocrine cells. Sometimes, these tumors develop in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Researchers want to find out if a combination of drugs can shrink these tumors. Objective: To learn if people with certain neuroendocrine tumors can take a combination of 2 drugs, Lutathera and Olaparib, without having severe side effects, and if this treatment makes the tumors shrink. Eligibility: Adults 18 and older who have a neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas or intestine that cannot be cured by surgery and has somatostatin receptors on the cells. Design: Participants will be screened under protocol 01-C-0129. They may have a tumor biopsy. Eligible participants will get Lutathera through an intravenous (IV) infusion every 8 weeks for 4 cycles. One cycle is 8 weeks. Each cycle includes a follow-up visit at week 4. For the IV, a small plastic tube is put into an arm vein. Participants will also take Olaparib by mouth twice a day for 4 weeks of each cycle. They will use a medicine diary to track the doses. During the study, participants will have physical exams. They will have blood and urine tests. They will fill out questionnaires about their general well-being and function. Their heart function will be tested. They will have scans of their chest, abdomen, and pelvis. One type of scan will use an IV infusion of a radioactive tracer. Participants will have a follow-up visit about 4 weeks after treatment ends. Then they will have follow-up visits every 12 weeks for 3 years. Then they will have yearly phone calls....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • 18F-FBnTP Positron Emission Mammography in Detecting Breast Cancer in Patients with Intraductal Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography works in detecting breast cancer in patients with intraductal breast cancer. 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography may detect may detect breast lesions with better sensitivity and better specificity.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Using FDG-PET / CT to Assess Response of Bone-Dominant Metastatic Breast Cancer, FEATURE Study

    This phase II trial studies how well FDG-PET / CT works in assessing the response of patients with breast cancer that has spread to the bones or mostly to the bones (bone-dominant metastatic breast cancer). Diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET / CT, may work better in measuring breast cancer activity before and after treatment compared to other standard imaging tests.
    Location: 47 locations

  • MRI Perfusion Compared to FDG PET / CT in Distinguishing between Radiation Injury and Tumor Progression in Patients with Cancer in the Brain Treated with Radiation Therapy

    This clinical trial compares magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion to fludeoxyglucose F 18 (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) to see how well they work in identifying the difference between brain damage caused by radiation therapy and tumor growth in patients who have received radiation therapy to the brain for a brain tumor or cancer that has spread from another part of the body. MRI perfusion uses an injected dye to study the blood vessels in the tumor. FDG PET / CT combines PET and CT scans to study how quickly tumor cells are growing. It is not yet known whether MRI perfusion or FDG PET / CT is more effective at distinguishing between brain damage and tumor growth.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Using Advanced Imaging Studies to Develop a Profile of Stage IIIC-IV High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    This trial investigates whether researchers can combine information provided by positron emission tomography / magnetic resonance imaging (PET / MRI) scans with information from tests on blood and tissue samples to develop a very detailed description (profile) of stage IIIC-IV high-grade serous ovarian cancer which could improve the ability to treat this disease. A PET / MRI scan is a two-in-one test that combines images from a PET scan and an MRI scan to produce very detailed pictures of the cancer. While computed tomography (CT) scans show images of the internal organs and tissues, PET and MRI scans provide important information about the disease by showing the activity of the cancer cells. Fludeoxyglucose F-18 is an imaging tracer that contains a very small amount of a radiation-emitting substance that can detect active cancer cells. This imaging tracer is used to improve the PET / MRI images. This information will help researchers more accurately predict the way tumors respond to treatment, which may improve their ability to individualize treatments for this disease.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • 18F-FDG and 18F-FDOPA PET Scan for the Diagnosis of Recurrent Brain Tumors

    This clinical trial studies FDG and FDOPA position emission tomography (PET) in diagnosing patients with brain tumors that have come back (recurrent). PET is a type of body scanning that involves radiation. The radiation is in the form of a “tracer” substance such as [18F]FDOPA or [18F]FDG, containing very small amounts of radioactivity, which is injected into the body. The PET machine detects the tracer throughout the body, allowing doctors to evaluate the functioning of the brain. Diagnostic procedures such as FDG and FDOPA PET may provide crucial functional information to distinguish recurrent tumors from treatment-induced radiation changes in patients with treated brain tumors. This may result in improved patient outcomes by allowing treating physicians to more accurately tailor treatments.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Dynamic PET / CT Scan in Imaging Patients Suspected of Having Cancer

    This trial studies how well an additional PET / CT scan immediately after injection of an imaging drug works in imaging patients who are suspected of having cancer. As part of standard of care, a PET / CT scan usually occurs about 1 hour after the imaging drug is injected and accumulates in different parts of the body. Performing an additional PET / CT scan during the first hour following imaging drug injection, may provide researchers with more information.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • An Investigational Scan (PET-MRI) for the Characterization of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    This trial studies positron emission tomography (PET)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma to determine if PET / MRI imaging correlates with cancer subtypes found by analyzing the tumor tissue after surgery. By using this technology, researchers may be able to provide early prognostic information to physicians so that the most appropriate treatment can be provided for future patients.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • 18F-Fluoroestradiol-PET / CT Scan for the Detection of Metastatic Disease in Patients with Invasive Breast Lobular Cancer

    This phase II trial studies a new positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT) scan using a radioactive imaging agent called fluoroestradiol F-18 to evaluate whether this method may improve the detection of invasive breast lobular cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Radioactive drugs, such as fluoroestradiol F-18, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Diagnostic procedures such as 18F-Fluoroestradiol-PET / CT, may identify sites of cancer in patients with invasive breast lobular cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • FDG PET-MRI for the Diagnosis of Spinal Cord Lesions

    This trial studies the best time point of using F18-FDG that gives the best image on PET-MRI in patients with spinal cord lesions of unknown cause. Diagnostic procedures, such as F18-FDG PET-MRI, may help find and diagnose spinal cord lesions.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • PET / MRI Scan for the Evaluation of Resectable Stage IA1-IB3 Cervical Cancer

    This trial studies how well positron emission tomography / magnetic resonance imaging (PET / MRI) scan works in checking patients with stage IA1-IB3 cervical cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). PET / MRI scan may help doctors learn more about the spread of the disease.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • PET / MRI Scan for Rectal Cancer Treatment Monitoring and Surveillance

    This trial studies the practicality of PET / MRI scan for rectal cancer treatment response monitoring and post-treatment observation in patients with stage I-IIIb rectal cancer who are receiving chemo-radiation as part of non-operative management practice. Diagnostic procedures such as PET / MRI, may help identify residual disease or detect disease that has come back in rectal cancer patients managed with non-operative management.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Tissue Analysis for Immediate Re-treatment after Thermal Ablation for Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    This phase II / III trial studies tissue analysis for immediate re-treatment after thermal ablation for colon cancer that has spread to the liver (liver metastases). Thermal ablation involves the destruction of tissue using sound waves that produce extremely high temperatures. Examining tissue samples from treated metastases right after ablation may show whether any cancer cells are still alive. This may help doctors immediately re-treat affected areas with a second round of thermal ablation and control the growth and spread of the disease.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • FDG PET / CT for the Diagnosis of Early Treatment Response in Patients with Genitourinary Cancer

    This clinical trial studies the effect of fludeoxyglucose F-18 (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing early treatment response in patients with genitourinary cancer. FDG PET / CT may help to determine if the treatment is effective in early treatment, so as to prevent patients from being exposed to unnecessary toxic treatment.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • 18F-FSPG PET / CT in Diagnosing Early Lung Cancer in Patients with Lung Nodules

    This phase II trial studies how well 18F-FSPG positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) work in diagnosing early lung cancer in patients with lung nodules. PET imaging with an imaging agent called 18F-FDG is often used in combination with a PET / CT scanner to evaluate cancers. Giving 18F-FSPG before a PET / CT scan may work better in helping researchers diagnose early lung cancer in patients with lung nodules.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Standard and Delayed FDG PET / CT after Chemoradiation Therapy in Assessing Patients with Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This trial studies how well standard and delayed fludeoxyglucose F-18 (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) given after standard radiation and chemotherapy works in assessing patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Diagnostic procedures, such as PET / CT, use radioactive material, such as fludeoxyglucose F-18, to find and diagnose head and neck tumors and may help to find out how far the disease has spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas


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