Clinical Trials Using Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-16 of 16
  • Prostate SBRT for Locally Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Prior Radiotherapy

    Background: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in U.S. men. Radiation is an effective treatment for most patients with localized prostate cancer, but sometimes the tumor returns. Researchers want to see if a highly focused type of radiation can help. It is given in only 5 treatments. It is called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Objective: To study the maximum tolerated dose and side effects of stereotactic body radiation therapy in people with a local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation. Eligibility: Men at least 18 years old who have recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy and no evidence of distant metastatic disease Design: Participants will be screened with blood tests, physical exam, and medical history. They may also have: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the prostate.. PET / CT scan. Participants will get an injection of 18F-DCFPyL for the PET scan. They will lie very still on their back on the scanner table. Small samples of prostate tumor tissue will be taken by a needle through the skin or rectum to see if the cancer is in the prostate. Small metal seeds will be placed into the prostate at the same time to help guide the radiation. About 2 weeks later, participants will have a radiation treatment planning CT scan. Participants will answer questions about their urine function, bowel function, erectile function, and mood. Participants will receive SBRT. They will have 5 radiation treatments over 2 weeks. Participants will have follow-up visits. They will have a physical exam, blood tests, and questionnaires. Six months after ending SBRT, the 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT will be repeated....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Combined With Enzalutamide and Abiraterone Using Multiparametric MRI and 18FDCFPyL PET / CT in Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer

    Background: Prostate cancer is a common cancer among men. There are several ways to treat it, including hormone blocking drugs, radiation therapy, and surgery. Researchers want to combine abiraterone and enzalutamide to see if there is a better way to treat prostate cancer. They also want to study a new radiotracer called 18F-DCFPyL, with the help of a scan called positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT) to see if there is a better way to detect prostate cancer. Objective: To develop improved techniques to localize and detect prostate cancer; and to develop new ways to treat prostate cancer Eligibility: Men ages 18 and older with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body Design: - Participants will have a medical evaluation to determine eligibility for the study. - Participants will take three different medications daily by mouth and receive two injections during the course of the study. - Participants will have a medical evaluation monthly (for 6 months) while taking the medications. - Participants will have prostate MRI and PET / CT scans before treatment, 2 months after starting treatment and again before surgery. The radiotracer will be given by injection about 2 hours before the whole-body scan. The PET / CT scan itself is about an hour. - Participants may be asked to do a biopsy before treatment and 2 months after starting treatment. - Participants will have a full medical evaluation before surgery to remove their prostate. - Participants will have a follow-up visit 3 months after surgery and then as needed. - Participants will be contacted once a year for their PSA and testosterone levels for 5 years...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT in Detecting High-Grade Prostate Cancer in Patients with Elevated PSA

    This phase II trial studies how well fluorine F 18 DCFPyL positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT) imaging works in detecting high-grade prostate cancer in patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. A PET scan uses radioactive material, also known as a radiotracer, injected into the blood to show the internal workings of the body. A CT scan uses x-rays and a computer to produce a 3-dimensional image of the body. Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL is a radioactive tracer, which when used with combined PET / CT imaging, may help doctors more accurately locate areas of high grade prostate cancer in patients with elevated PSA.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Serial PSMA PET Scans for the Imaging of Newly Diagnosed, Progressive, or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II / III trial studies how well serial PSMA PET scans work in imaging patients with prostate cancer that is newly diagnosed, growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressive), or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). PSMA PET scans use radiation to make images of tumors. Serial PSMA PET scans may work better at showing the PSMA protein, which is located on many prostate cancer cells, and in assessing treatment response in patients with prostate cancer compared to the usual imaging methods.
    Location: 7 locations

  • An Investigational Scan (18F-DCFPyL PET / CT) in Detecting Progression in Patients with Metastatic or Non-metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Receiving Standard Androgen Receptor Targeted Treatment

    This trial studies how well an investigational scan called 18F-DCFPyL positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) works in detecting progression in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places (metastatic) or has not spread to other places (non-metastatic) in the body. 18F-DCFPyL is a radioactive material, also known as a radiotracer, that is injected into the blood and detected using PET / CT scans to show the internal workings of the body. Diagnostic procedures, such as 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT, may help find and diagnose disease and find out how far the disease has spread.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT Scan in Diagnosing Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well 18F-DCFPyL positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) scan works in diagnosing patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. 18F-DCFPyL may be effective in detecting prostate cancer tissue in the body when used with PET / CT imaging techniques.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • An Investigational Imaging Scan ([18F]DCFPyL PET / CT) in Monitoring Response to Treatment in Patients with Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well an investigational imaging scan called [18F]DCFPyL positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) works in monitoring response to treatment in patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). [18F]DCFPyL is a radioactive drug (tracer) that targets prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a protein found mostly on the surface of prostate tumor cells. Using [18F]DCFPyL with PET / CT scans may help doctors identify prostate cancer and its response to treatment.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / MRI in Diagnosing Participants with Stage I-IV Prostate Cancer

    This research study involves the use of a scanner that is capable of taking PET and MR images at the same time. A PET scan is a test that uses radioactive glucose (sugar) and a computer to create images of how organs and tissues in the body are functioning. Abnormal cells in the body use glucose at a different rate than normal cells and this allows the scanner to create a detailed picture of how your body is working. A MR scan uses strong magnets and computers to created detailed images of the soft tissue in your body. The purpose of this study is to gain understanding how PET-MR (positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging) using the substance 18F-DCFPyL (PyL) may help in diagnosing prostate cancer and in determining the stage of prostate cancer before surgery. We will compare the results of PET / MR images after giving you the contrast agent with the images of a mp-MRI which will be taken during the same scan as the PET / MR as part of your routine prostate cancer care. The results of both the mp-MRI and PET / MR will be compared to the cancer tissue taken during your prostate cancer surgery. All of the scans performed in this study are considered standard of care for prostate cancer. This research study involves the use of a scanner that is capable of taking PET and MR images at the same time. A PET scan is a test that uses radioactive glucose (sugar) and a computer to create images of how organs and tissues in the body are functioning. Abnormal cells in the body use glucose at a different rate than normal cells and this allows the scanner to create a detailed picture of how your body is working. A MR scan uses strong magnets and computers to create detailed images of the soft tissue in your body. The purpose of this study is to gain understanding how PET-MR (positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging) using the substance 18F-DCFPyL (PyL) may help in diagnosing prostate cancer and in determining the stage of prostate cancer before surgery. We will compare the results of PET / MR images after giving you the contrast agent with the images of a mp-MRI which will be taken during the same scan as the PET / MR as part of your routine prostate cancer care. The results of both the mp-MRI and PET / MR will be compared to the cancer tissue taken during your prostate cancer surgery. All of the scans performed in this study are considered standard of care for prostate cancer.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Functional Tests in Predicting Response to Drugs that Inhibit Growth of New Blood Vessels in Patients with Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well functional tests work in predicting response to drugs that inhibit the growth of new blood vessels in patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body and can be removed by surgery. Functional tests may help in monitoring the effectiveness of different treatments for kidney cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT and PET / MRI in Imaging Participants with Gynecological Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well fluorine F 18 DCFPyL positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) and PET / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) work in imaging participants with gynecological cancer. Diagnostic procedures, such as fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT and PET / MRI, may help find and diagnose gynecological cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT and PET / MRI in Imaging Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well fluorine F 18 DCFPyL positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) and PET / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) work in imaging patients with prostate cancer. Diagnostic procedures, such as fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT and PET / MRI, may more accurately diagnose prostate cancer, identify the stage of the cancer, and see if the cancer has spread to other parts of their body after treatment with hormonal therapy.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT in High Risk and Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Background: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. When prostate cancer is confined to the prostate there is a high chance of cure. However, it is outside the prostate or comes back after treatment, additional therapy may be needed. Current methods of imaging prostate cancer are limited. Researchers want to see if a radiotracer called 18F-DCFPyL can identify prostate cancer in patients who have a high risk of cancer spreading outside the prostate or who have signs of recurrent cancer after treatment. Objectives: To see if the radiotracer 18F-DCFyL can help identify prostate cancer in the body before or after therapy. Eligibility: Men ages 18 and older who have prostate cancer that has been newly diagnosed, or has relapsed after radiation or surgery Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will have blood taken. Participants will be divided into 2 groups. - Group 1 will be men with cancer that has been newly diagnosed as high risk by their doctor who are scheduled to have prostate removal surgery or undergo biopsy before radiation therapy. - Group 2 will be men who have presumed prostate cancer relapse after prostate removal surgery or radiation therapy. Both groups will have scans taken. Participants will lie still on a table in a machine that takes pictures of their body. 18F-DCFyL will be injected by intravenous (IV) line. Participants will be contacted for follow-up after scans. Participants in Group 1 may have surgery to remove their prostate gland or a biopsy to remove some prostate tissue. This procedure will be standard of care and is not a part of this study. They will also have an extra MRI scan of their prostate. For this, a tube, called an endorectal coil, will be placed in their rectum. Other tubes may be wrapped around the inside of their pelvis. A contrast agent will be given by IV. Participants in Group 2 may also undergo an MRI of the pelvis and may have a biopsy of abnormalities found on the 18F-DCFyL scan. Participants will have data about their prostate cancer collected for up to 1 year.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • 18F-DCFPyL PSMA- Versus 18F-NaF-PET Imaging for Detection of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Background: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. Few options exist to create images of this type of cancer. Researchers think an experimental radiotracer called 18F-DCFPyL could find sites of cancer in the body. Objective: To see if 18F-DCFPyL can identify sites of prostate cancer in people with the disease. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have metastatic prostate cancer Design: Participants will be screened with: - Blood tests - Physical exam - Medical history Participants will be assigned to 1 of 2 groups based on their PSA. Participants will have 18F-DCFPyL injected into a vein. About 2 hours later they will have a whole-body Positron Emission Tomography / Computed Tomography (PET / CT). For the scan, they will lie on their back on the scanner table while it takes pictures of the body. This lasts about 50 minutes. On another day, participants will have 18F -NaF injected into a vein. About 1 hour later, they will have a whole-body PET / CT. Participants will be contacted 1 3 days later for follow-up. They may undergo PET / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) either after having a 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT, or in place of PET / CT imaging. A tube may be placed in the rectum. More coils may be wrapped around the outside of the pelvis. If the 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT is positive participants will be encouraged to undergo a biopsy of one of the tumors. The biopsy will be taken through a needle put through the skin into the tumor. Participants will be followed for 1 year. During this time researchers will collect information about their prostate cancer, such as PSA levels and biopsy results. About 4-6 months after scanning is completed, participants may have a tumor biopsy. The biopsy will be taken through a needle put through the skin into the tumor. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT in Imaging Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This clinical trial studies how well fluorine F 18 DCFPyL positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) works in imaging patients with prostate cancer. A PET scan uses radioactive material such as fluorine F 18 DCFPyL injected into the blood to show the internal workings of the body. A CT scan uses x-rays and a computer to produce a 3-dimensional image of the body. Diagnostic procedures, such as fluorine F 18 DCFPyL PET / CT may help the doctors understand the exact location of the disease.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • PSMA-Based PET in Imaging Patients with High-Risk Localized or Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    This pilot trial studies how well fluorine F 18 DCFPyL (prostate-specific membrane antigen [PSMA])-based positron emission tomography (PET) works in imaging patients with high-risk prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body, or prostate cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Diagnostic procedures, such as PSMA-based PET, may help doctors confirm the finding of prostate cancer at its original site in the prostate gland, and see if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body before and after treatment with hormonal therapy.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Fluorine F 18 DCFPy PET / CT in Imaging Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of fluorine F 18 DCFPy positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) and how well it works in imaging patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body or to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Fluorine F18 DCFPy is a radioactive material injected into the blood that is taken up by prostate cancer cells. PET is a procedure that takes detailed pictures of areas inside the body where the material is taken up. CT scans use x-rays and a computer to produce a 3-dimensional image of the body. Combining fluorine F 18 DCFPy PET and CT scans may help doctors better identify the location of prostate cancer and how far it has spread.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland