Clinical Trials Using Gemcitabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Gemcitabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 106

  • Nab-Paclitaxel, Gemcitabine, and Hypofractionated Ablative Proton Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine when given together with hypofractionated ablative proton beam radiation therapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and proton beam radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • EndoTAG-1 Plus Gemcitabine Versus Gemcitabine Alone in Patients With Measurable Locally Advanced and / or Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas Failed on FOLFIRINOX Treatment

    The aim of this adaptive Phase 3 trial is to show a statistically significant superiority of EndoTAG-1 in combination with gemcitabine compared to gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with locally advanced / metastatic pancreatic cancer after FOLFIRINOX failure.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Paediatric Hepatic International Tumour Trial

    The PHITT trial is an over-arching study for patients with Hepatoblastoma (HB) and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). This trial will use a risk-adapted approach to the treatment of children diagnosed with HB. Children with HCC will be included as a separate cohort.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Comparing NUC-1031 Plus Cisplatin to Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin in Patients With Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer

    NuTide:121 compares NUC-1031 with gemcitabine, both in combination with cisplatin, in patients with previously untreated advanced biliary tract cancer. The primary hypotheses are: - The combination of NUC-1031 plus cisplatin prolongs overall survival compared to the gemcitabine plus cisplatin standard of care - The combination of NUC-1031 plus cisplatin increases overall response rate compared to the gemcitabine plus cisplatin standard of care
    Location: 4 locations

  • PCI Treatment / Gemcitabine & Chemotherapy vs Chemotherapy Alone in Patients With Inoperable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    This study will assess the safety and effectiveness of fimaporfin-induced photochemical internalisation (PCI) of gemcitabine complemented by systemic gemcitabine / cisplatin chemotherapy compared to gemcitabine / cisplatin alone, in patients with inoperable cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Participants will be randomly assigned to one of the treatment groups and will receive study treatment for 6 months, followed by assessments every 3 months, as applicable.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pemigatinib + Pembrolizumab vs Pemigatinib Alone vs Standard of Care for Urothelial Carcinoma (FIGHT-205)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of pemigatinib plus pembrolizumab or pemigatinib alone versus the standard of care for participants with metastatic or unresectable urothelial carcinoma who are not eligible to receive cisplatin, are harboring FGFR3 mutation or rearrangement, and who have not received prior treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Gemcitabine, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine, bendamustine hydrochloride, and nivolumab when given together and to see how well they work in treating patients with classic Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and bendamustine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving gemcitabine, bendamustine hydrochloride, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with classic Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable and Locally Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and chemotherapy work in treating patients with urothelial carcinoma that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with urothelial carcinoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carbon Ion or Conventional Photon Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well carbon ion radiation therapy works compared to conventional photon radiation therapy when giving together with chemotherapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Carbon ion radiation therapy uses charged carbon particles to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Conventional photon radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a type of 3-dimensional radiation therapy that uses computer-generated images to show the size and shape of the tumor. This type of radiation therapy reduces the damage to healthy tissue near the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, nab-paclitaxel, capecitabine, fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin and oxaliplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Given carbon ion radiation therapy with chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer compared to conventional photon radiation therapy and chemotherapy.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • A Study Of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations In Participants With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (Morpheus- Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two cohorts will be enrolled in parallel in this study: the first-line (1L) cohort will consist of patients who have not received any systemic therapy for their disease and the second-line (2L) cohort will consist of patients who progressed during or after receiving a platinum-containing regimen and a PD-L1 / PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor treatment. In each cohort, eligible patients will be assigned to one of several treatment arms.
    Location: 3 locations

  • CHARM II: Chemotherapy for Ablation and Resolution of Mucinous Pancreatic Cysts

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of chemotherapeutic pancreatic cyst ablation using ethanol lavage followed by the infusion of a dual-agent chemotherapeutic cocktail (paclitaxel + gemcitabine) compared with alcohol-free saline lavage followed by infusion of the same dual-agent chemotherapeutic cocktail (paclitaxel + gemcitabine) for the ablation of pancreatic cystic neoplasms using endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) for agent delivery.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Paricalcitol and Hydroxychloroquine in Combination with Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial investigates how well paricalcitol and hydroxychloroquine work when combined with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Paricalcitol (a form of vitamin D) works by blocking a signal in the cancer cells that leads to growth and spreading of the tumor. Hydroxychloroquine (an autophagy inhibitor) enhances the activity of standard chemotherapy on cancer cells and prevent them to utilize energy to grow. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving paricalcitol and hydroxychloroquine together with standard chemotherapy (gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel) may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to either paricalcitol or hydroxychloroquine alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pulsed Low-Dose-Rate Radiation for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of pulsed low-dose-rate radiation (PLDR) in treating patients with pancreatic cancer. During PLDR, radiation delivered is broken into pulses over a relatively longer period of time. Undergoing PLDR may create a more favorable environment for tumor shrinkage with fewer side effects and less damage to surrounding vital organs compared to conventional radiation therapy. It also may make surgery a more likely option in patients who are not otherwise good candidates for surgery to remove the tumor.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • AGEN1884 and AGEN2034 in Combination with Cisplatin and Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer before Radical Cystectomy

    This phase II trial investigates how well AGEN1884 and AGEN2034 work in combination with cisplatin and gemcitabine in treating patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer before surgery that removes all of the bladder as well as nearby tissues and organs (radical cystectomy). AGEN1884 (a CTLA-4 blocking agent) and AGEN2034 (a PD-1 blocking agent) are a class of drugs called immune checkpoint inhibitors that may help the body's immune system attack the cancer and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Standard of care treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer is chemotherapy followed by surgery and a cystectomy. Adding AGEN1884 and AGEN2034 to this standard treatment may improve the rate of the bladder cancer coming back.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Hepatic Arterial Infusion Using Codman Catheter / Synchromed Pump for the Treatment of Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases or Unresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) using the Codman catheter / Synchromed pump in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver (metastases) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. HAI is a procedure in which chemotherapy drugs are directly delivered to the liver through a pump that is surgically implanted into the liver. This approach can produce higher local concentrations of the infused drug with few systemic side effects. The manufacturer of the main pump device used for HAI terminated production in April 2018. Thus, alternate means of employing HAI need to be devised in order to continue offering this therapy. This trial may help researchers learn about the safety of HAI using a similar pump, the Synchromed II, combined with a Codman vascular catheter.
    Location: University of Kentucky / Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, Kentucky

  • A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Polatuzumab Vedotin in Combination With Rituximab, Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin Compared to Rituximab, Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin Alone in Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This study is a multicenter, open-label study of polatuzumab vedotin administered by intravenous (IV) infusion in combination with rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (R-GemOx) in participants with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The study comprises of two stages: a safety run-in stage and a randomized controlled trial.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • A Study of Erdafitinib Versus Investigator Choice of Intravesical Chemotherapy in Participants Who Received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and Recurred With High Risk Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate recurrence-free survival (RFS) in participants treated with erdafitinib vs Investigator's Choice, for participants with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) who harbor fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations or fusions, and who recurred after bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) therapy.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Copanlisib and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or Relapsed Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of copanlisib when given together with combination chemotherapy (R-GCD) in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or grade 3b follicular lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) after 1 prior line of therapy. Copanlisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, gemcitabine, carboplatin, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving copanlisib together with R-GCD as second line therapy may improve the complete response rate for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or follicular lymphoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • CAMPFIRE: A Study of Ramucirumab (LY3009806) in Children and Young Adults With Synovial Sarcoma

    This study is being conducted to test the safety and efficacy of ramucirumab in combination with other chemotherapy in the treatment of relapsed, recurrent, or refractory synovial sarcoma (SS) in children and young adults. This trial is part of the CAMPFIRE master protocol which is a platform to accelerate the development of new treatments for pediatric and young adult participants with cancer. Your participation in this trial could last 12 months or longer, depending on how you and your tumor respond.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Biologically Optimized Infusion Schedule of Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well a biologically optimized infusion schedule of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Altering the timing of the nab-paclitaxel infusion may improve response in patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Galeterone Alone or Combined with Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Refractory Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well an investigational agent called galeterone works by itself, or in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer that does not respond to standard treatment (refractory) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Galeterone may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Information from this study may help doctors learn more about galeterone and the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, which may benefit patients with the same or a similar condition in the future.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Lonsurf, Gemcitabine, and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of Lonsurf, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel in treating patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that has spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as Lonsurf, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Cancer Stem Cell Assay Directed Chemotherapy in Recurrent Platinum Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    The purpose of this clinical study is to confirm the utility of chemosensitivity (ChemoID) tumor testing on cancer stem cells as a predictor of clinical response in recurrent platinum resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. Population studied will be female participants experiencing a recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (no mucinous, low grade serous, or pure sarcoma types), with ≤ 5 prior treatments, and a performance status 0-1.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Nab-Paclitaxel + Cisplatin + Gemcitabine in Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This is a phase II open-label study evaluating the efficacy and safety of nab-paclitaxel cisplatin, and gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Durvalumab and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Variant Histology Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and chemotherapy before surgery in treating patients with variant histology bladder cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, cisplatin, gemcitabine, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab in addition to standard chemotherapy may lead to better outcomes in patients with variant histology bladder cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California