Clinical Trials Using Ibrutinib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Ibrutinib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 70

  • Ibrutinib and Venetoclax for the Treatment of Patients with MYD88-Mutated Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

    This phase II trial investigates how well ibrutinib and venetoclax work in treating patients with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia that has not been treated (treatment naive) and has a specific alteration in a gene called MYD88. Ibrutinib is a targeted therapy that blocks Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Venetoclax is a targeted therapy that blocks BCL-2, a protein that is important for the survival of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia cells. Giving ibrutinib and venetoclax in combination may kill more cancer cells compared to either drug alone, and may cause tumors to shrink.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Ublituximab and Umbralisib in Subjects With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Currently Treated With Ibrutinib, Acalabrutinib or Venetoclax

    Phase 2, two cohort trial evaluating the addition of ublituximab and umbralisib on the rate of minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity in subjects with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), who are currently on treatment with ibrutinib, alacabrutinib or venetoclax.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ibrutinib and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib and venetoclax and to see how well they work in treating patients with follicular lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Giving ibrutinib and venetoclax may work better in treating patients with follicular lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ibrutinib and Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and brentuximab vedotin work in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib together with brentuximab vedotin may be a better treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ibrutinib, Temozolomide, Etoposide, Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Dexamethasone, and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib when given together with temozolomide, etoposide, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, and rituximab in treating patients with central nervous system lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as temozolomide, etoposide, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib with rituximab and combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Copanlisib and Ibrutinib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the effect of copanlisib given in combination with ibrutinib in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Copanlisib and ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving copanlisib together with ibrutinib may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Front Line Ibrutinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Graft-Versus Host Disease

    Background: Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease (cGVHD) can occur after a person has had a stem cell or bone marrow transplant. In cGVHD, the donor cells attack the recipient s body. Researchers want to see if a drug called ibruntinib can block one of the proteins that lead to the immune reaction that causes cGVHD. Objective: To see if ibrutinib as a first-line treatment can help people with newly diagnosed cGVHD. Eligibility: People age 18 and older with newly diagnosed moderate or severe cGVHD Design: Participants will be screened with medical and medicine histories physical exam and vital signs electrocardiograms (to measure heart function) assessment of their ability to perform daily activities blood and urine tests assessment of their general well-being. Participants will visit the Clinical Center every 2 weeks for the first 2 months. Then they will visit every 4 weeks. Participants will take ibrutinib by mouth once every day of every cycle. One cycle is 28 days. Treatment will last up to 2 years. Participants will keep a medicine diary. Participants will take tests to measure lung function. They may have computed tomography scans of their chest. They will complete questionnaires about their symptoms and how cGVHD is affecting their body and quality of life. They will repeat the screening tests. Participants may have optional blood tests and / or skin biopsies to better understand the drug s effect on the body. Participants will be contacted by phone 30 days after treatment ends. They will also be contacted once a year for 2 years to discuss how they are feeling and if they have taken any other medicines to treat cGVHD.
    Location: 2 locations

  • CD19-specific CAR-T Cells in CLL / SLL and DLBCL

    This is a first-in-human study to evaluate the feasibility, safety and preliminary antitumor efficacy of autologous T cells genetically engineered with a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and manufactured with a new process. CAR-T cells will be investigated in combination with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) / small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) and as single agent in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ibrutinib and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed or Refractory Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of ibrutinib citrate when given with ixazomib, and determines how well they work in treating patients with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia that is newly diagnosed, has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Enzyme inhibitors, such as ibrutinib and ixazomib citrate, may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pevonedistat and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat when given together with ibrutinib in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or has stopped responding to other treatments (refractory). Pevonedistat and ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ibrutinib and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and blinatumomab work in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or is not responding to treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Obinutuzumab, Ibrutinib, and Venetoclax for the Treatment of Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab, ibrutinib, and venetoclax work in treating patients with previously untreated stage II-IV follicular lymphoma. Immunotherapy with obinutuzumab may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib and venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving obinutuzumab, ibrutinib, and venetoclax together may work better in treating follicular lymphoma compared to each drug alone.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Daratumumab and Ibrutinib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, DIRECT Study

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab and ibrutinib work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody which works with the body’s immune system to destroy cancer cells. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared to ibrutinib alone.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Temozolomide, Etoposide, Doxil, Dexamethasone, Ibrutinib, and Rituximab (TEDDI-R) in Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas With Secondary Involvement of the Central Nervous System (CNS)

    Background: Secondary central nervous system lymphoma (sCNSL) is cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat it do not cross the blood-brain barrier. This makes it hard to treat. Researchers hope that a new combination of drugs may be able to help. Objective: To find a better way to treat sCNSL. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with sCNSL Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Eye exam - Tissue or tumor biopsy - Collection of cerebrospinal fluid - CT, PET, and MRI scans: Participants will like in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Bone marrow aspirations or biopsies: A needle will be inserted into the participant s hipbone. The needle will remove a small amount of marrow. Participants will take the study drugs in 21-day cycles. They will take some drugs by mouth. They will take others through a catheter: A small tube will be inserted into a vein in the arm, neck, or chest. They may have drugs given through a catheter placed through the brain or injected into the spinal canal. Participants will have regular visits during the study. These will include repeats of the screening test. They may also provide a saliva sample or have a cheek swab. Participants will have up to 4 treatment cycles. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment dose. Then they will have visits every 3-6 months for 3 years and then yearly....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Ibrutinib and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia after Ibrutinib Resistance

    This phase II trial studies how well the combination of ibrutinib and venetoclax works in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia whose cancer has stopped responding to ibrutinib alone. Both ibrutinib and venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ibrutinib and venetoclax together after development of ibrutinib resistance may work better than discontinuing ibrutinib and switching to other chemotherapy drugs.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Nivolumab and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well nivolumab and ibrutinib work in treating patients with central nervous system lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with central nervous system lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ibrutinib and Rituximab for Steroid-Refractory or Dependent Chronic GVHD

    This phase I / II trial studies the safety and efficacy of ibrutinib and rituximab combination therapy in treating patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease following allogeneic stem cell transplant. Based on the relative roles of inflammatory cytokines, T-cells and B-cells in the pathophysiology of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and the favorable individual effects of ibrutinib and rituximab in the cGVHD setting, combination ibrutinib and rituximab may confer additive or potentially synergistic benefit in the management of this challenging process.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

  • Ibrutinib and Cetuximab or Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works with cetuximab or nivolumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back or has spread to other places in the body. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib with cetuximab or nivolumab may work better in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Ibrutinib and Radiation Therapy with or without Temozolomide in Treating Participants with Newly Diagnosed Methylated or Unmethylated Glioblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of ibrutinib when given together with radiation therapy radiation and with or without temozolomide in treating participants with newly diagnosed methylated or unmethylated glioblastoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether giving ibrutinib and radiation therapy with or without temozolomide may work better in treating glioblastoma.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Ibrutinib and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with High Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared to ibrutinib or pembrolizumab alone.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Venetoclax and Ibrutinib in Treating in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Ibrutinib Resistance Mutations

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax and ibrutinib work in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and have developed genetic mutations after previously being treated with ibrutinib. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax and ibrutinib together may help treat patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has developed ibrutinib resistance.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Daratumumab and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Symptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase Ib trials studies the side effects of daratumumab and ibrutinib and how well they work in treating patients with symptomatic chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Ibrutinib in Treating Participants with Untreated High Risk Smoldering Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works in treating participants with untreated high risk smoldering mental cell lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax, Ibrutinib, Prednisone, Obinutuzumab, and Revlimid (ViPOR) in Relapsed / Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    Background: B-cell lymphoma is a cancer of white blood cells found in the lymph nodes. It affects the system that fights infections and disease. Researchers want to learn how certain drugs work together to treat B-cell lymphomas. The drugs are venetoclax, ibrutinib, prednisone, obinutuzumab, and lenalidomide (ViPOR). Objective: To study the safety of ViPOR for people with B-cell lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with B-cell lymphoma whose cancer has returned or not improved after treatment Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Tissue sample from previous procedure - Imaging scans - Registration for counseling on the risks of lenalidomide. They must get counseling at least every 28 days. Participants will have a bone marrow aspiration before treatment. Participants may have tumor samples taken. Participants will get ViPOR in 21-day cycles. For up to 6 cycles: - Participants will get one drug by IV on days 1 and 2. - Participants will take the other four drugs by mouth on most days. After their first dose of venetoclax, they will stay in the clinic for at least 8 hours and return the next day for monitoring. They may be admitted for more drugs or monitoring. Participants will keep a drug diary. Participants will have a physical exam and blood and urine tests at least once per cycle. They will have scans 4 times over 6 cycles. Participants will have a visit about 1 month after their last dose of study drug. They will then have visits every few months for 3 years, and once a year for years 4 and 5. Visits include a physical exam, blood tests, and scans.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Patient-Derived Xenografts in Personalizing Treatment for Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This early phase I pilot trial studies how well patient-derived xenografts work in personalizing treatment for patients with mantle cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or that isn't responding to treatment (refractory). Xenograft models involve taking a piece of tissue from a tumor that was previously collected and putting that tissue inside of a mouse in the laboratory. This allows the tumor to grow in the mouse so that researchers can test the effects of certain drugs. If the drugs have an effect on the tumor(s) in the mice, patients may receive that treatment for mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas