Clinical Trials Using Pertuzumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Pertuzumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 26
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  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1189 locations

  • Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and atezolizumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 174 locations

  • My Pathway: A Study Evaluating Herceptin / Perjeta, Tarceva, Zelboraf / Cotellic, Erivedge, Alecensa, and Tecentriq Treatment Targeted Against Certain Molecular Alterations in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This multicenter, non-randomized, open-label study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of six treatment regimens in participants with advanced solid tumors for whom therapies that will convey clinical benefit are not available and / or are not suitable options per the treating physician's judgment.
    Location: 24 locations

  • Randomized, Open Label, Clinical Study of the Targeted Therapy, Palbociclib, to Treat Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate that the combination of palbociclib with anti-HER2 therapy plus endocrine therapy is superior to anti-HER2-based therapy plus endocrine therapy alone in improving the outcomes of subjects with hormone receptor-positive, HER2+ metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 24 locations

  • I-SPY 2 TRIAL: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to further advance the ability to practice personalized medicine by learning which new drug agents are most effective with which types of breast cancer tumors and by learning more about which early indicators of response (tumor analysis prior to surgery via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images along with tissue and blood samples) are predictors of treatment success.
    Location: 15 locations

  • TAPUR: Testing the Use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approved Drugs That Target a Specific Abnormality in a Tumor Gene in People With Advanced Stage Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to learn from the real world practice of prescribing targeted therapies to patients with advanced cancer whose tumor harbors a genomic variant known to be a drug target or to predict sensitivity to a drug. NOTE: Due to character limits, the arms section does NOT include all TAPUR Study relevant biomarkers. For additional information, contact TAPUR@asco.org, or if a patient, your nearest participating TAPUR site (see participating centers).
    Location: 8 locations

  • Response to Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab before Surgery in Determining Treatment after Surgery in Patients with Stage II-III HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies whether the response to paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab before surgery helps to determine treatment after surgery in patients with stage II-III HER2-positive breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Evaluating the response to paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab before surgery may help patients and doctors determine treatment options after surgery.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Taselisib and Anti-HER2 Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced HER2+ Breast Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of taselisib when given with anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) therapies in treating patients with HER2 positive (HER2+) breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Taselisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab emtansine, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as fulvestrant, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. It is not yet known whether taselisib works better when given together with trastuzumab emtansine, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab, or with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, paclitaxel, and fulvestrant in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study To Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety Of Atezolizumab or Placebo in Combination With Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin + Cyclophosphamide Followed By Paclitaxel + Trastuzumab + Pertuzumab In Early Her2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This study (also known as IMpassion050) will evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab compared with placebo when given in combination with neoadjuvant dose-dense anthracycline (doxorubicin) + cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel + trastuzumab + pertuzumab (ddAC-PacHP) in patients with early HER2-positive breast cancer (T2-4, N1-3, M0).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Pertuzumab, and High-Dose Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Her2-Positive Breast Cancer with Central Nervous System Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works when given together with pertuzumab and high-dose trastuzumab in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the central nervous system from other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and pertuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, may induce changes in body’s immune system, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Giving atezolizumab, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer compared to pertuzumab and trastuzumab.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Resectable, or Inflammatory Her2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with Her2 positive breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, can be removed by surgery, or is inflammatory. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Anastrozole, Palbociclib, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab in Treating Participants with HR-Positive, HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of anastrozole, palbociclib, trastuzumab and pertuzumab and how well they work in treating participants with hormone receptor-(HR) positive, HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other locations in the body. Anastrozole and palbociclib are enzyme inhibitors that may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving anastrozole, palbociclib, trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better in treating participants with HR+, HER2+ metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Tocilizumab in Treating Participants with Metastatic or Unresectable HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab in treating participants with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of LY2835219 (Abemaciclib) in Combination With Therapies for Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    This study evaluates the safety of abemaciclib in combination therapies (letrozole, anastrozole, tamoxifen, exemestane, exemestane plus everolimus, trastuzumab, LY3023414 plus fulvestrant, pertuzumab plus trastuzumab with loperamide) for breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Nivolumab and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and standard chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer. Immunotherapy with a monoclonal antibody such as nivolumab works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1. PD-1 is a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Antibodies that block PD-1 can potentially prevent PD-1 from shutting down the immune system, thus allowing immune cells to recognize and destroy tumor cells. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the addition of nivolumab to standard chemotherapy improves response rate in patients with inflammatory breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Is Locally Recurrent, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase IIa trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab when given together with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has come back at or near the same place as the original (primary) tumor, has spread to other places in the body, or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Patient Preference and Satisfaction of Subcutaneous Administration of the Fixed-Dose Combination of Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab in Participants With HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer

    This is a Phase II, randomized, multicentre, multinational, open-label, cross-over study in adult patients who have completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy with neoadjuvant pertuzumab and trastuzumab and have undergone surgical treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive early breast cancer. The study will consist of two adjuvant treatment periods: a treatment cross-over period and a treatment continuation period. It will evaluate participant-reported preference for a subcutaneously administered fixed-dose combination formulation (FDC SC) of pertuzumab and trastuzumab compared with intravenously (IV) administered pertuzumab and trastuzumab formulations. The study will also evaluate participant-reported satisfaction with pertuzumab and trastuzumab FDC SC and health-related quality of life outcomes; healthcare professionals' perceptions of time / resource use and convenience of pertuzumab and trastuzumab FDC SC compared with pertuzumab and trastuzumab IV formulations; as well as the safety and efficacy of each study regimen.
    Location: 2 locations

  • HER2 Directed Dendritic Cell Vaccine, Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Stage II-III HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy work in treating participants with stage II-III HER-2 positive breast cancer. Dendritic cells are immune cells that can tell the immune system to fight infection. Vaccines made from a person's dendritic cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy may work better in participants with HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Interferon Gamma-1b, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of interferon gamma-1b in combination with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab in treating patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer. Interferon gamma-1b is a substance that can improve the body’s natural response and may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of "targeted therapy" because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving interferon gamma, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better than other therapies in treating HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Neratinib and Paclitaxel with or without Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab before Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effect and best dose of neratinib and to see how well it works with paclitaxel and with or without pertuzumab and trastuzumab before combination chemotherapy in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Neratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with pertuzumab and trastuzumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving neratinib, pertuzumab, trastuzumab, paclitaxel and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Copper Cu 64-DOTA-Trastuzumab PET Imaging in Predicting Response to Treatment with Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab before Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well copper Cu 64-DOTA-trastuzumab positron emission tomography (PET) works in predicting response to treatment with trastuzumab and pertuzumab before surgery in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Diagnostic procedures, such as copper Cu 64 DOTA-trastuzumab PET, may help predict a patient’s response to trastuzumab and pertuzumab before surgery in patients with locally advanced HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carboplatin and paclitaxel given in combination with pertuzumab and trastuzumab or bevacizumab work in treating patients with breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, trastuzumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel together with pertuzumab and trastuzumab or bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • A Safety Extension Study of Trastuzumab Emtansine in Participants Previously Treated With Trastuzumab Emtansine Alone or in Combination With Other Anti-Cancer Therapy in One of the Parent Studies

    This is a global, multicenter, open-label safety extension study. Participants receiving single-agent trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab emtansine administered in combination with other agents in a Genentech / Roche-sponsored parent study who are active and deriving benefit at the closure of parent study are eligible for continued treatment in this study.
    Location: Translational Oncology Research International, Los Angeles, California

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2 / Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2 / neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 654 locations


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