Clinical Trials Using Sirolimus

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Sirolimus. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-35 of 35

  • Conventional and Regulatory T Cells in Treating Patients with Advanced Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing T Cell-Depleted Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of conventional T cells and regulatory T cells and to see how well they work in treating patients with hematologic malignancies that have spread to other places in the body (advanced) and are undergoing T cell-depleted donor stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) later may help the patient's immune system see any remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect).
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Low-Dose Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best way to give low-dose donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) and to see how well it works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's bone marrow cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, that do not exactly match the patient's blood, are infused into the patient they may help patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Sirolimus and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Stage I-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This trial studies the side effects of sirolimus and durvalumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Sirolimus is an oral medication that blocks the mTOR cellular pathway which may help the immune system work better. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sirolimus before durvalumab may help the immune system get rid of cancer.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Itacitinib, Tacrolimus, and Sirolimus for the Prevention of GVHD in Patients with Acute leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Myelofibrosis Undergoing Reduced Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase IIa trial studies the side effects of itacitinib when given together with standard treatment (tacrolimus and sirolimus), and to see how well it works in preventing graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) in patients with acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or myelofibrosis who are undergoing reduced intensity conditioning donor stem cell transplantation. GVHD is a common complication after donor stem cell transplantation, resulting from donor immune cells recognizing recipients' cells and attacking them. Adding itacitinib to tacrolimus and sirolimus may reduce the risk GVHD and ultimately improve overall outcome and survival after donor stem cell transplantation.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Human Lysozyme Goat Milk for the Prevention of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of human lysozyme goat milk in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can cause an immune response against the body's own normal cells (call graft versus host disease). The goat milk in the study is from goats that have been genetically engineered to produce human lysozyme in the milk. Human lysozyme is a natural enzyme found in human milk and acts as an antimicrobial. Lysozyme is key to the digestive health of breast-fed human infants, since it helps the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and reduces the growth of bacteria that causes diarrhea and intestinal disease. Giving human lysozyme goat milk may reduce the rate of graft versus host disease in blood cancer patients undergoing a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Regulatory T-Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Suppressing Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease after Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well regulatory T-lymphocytes and aldesleukin work in suppressing acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) after umbilical cord blood transplant in patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving regulatory T-lymphocytes and aldesleukin after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • BMS-986004, Sirolimus, and Tacrolimus in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Patients with Hematologic Cancer or Blood Disorder

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects, best dose and how well BMS-986004 works when given together with sirolimus and tacrolimus in preventing graft versus host disease after donor stem cell transplant in patients with hematologic cancer or blood disorder. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as BMS-986004, sirolimus, and tacrolimus, are used to decrease the body’s immune response and may help reduce the incidence of graft versus host disease.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Reducing Rates of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide work in reducing rates of graft versus host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Pacritinib, Sirolimus, and Tacrolimus in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of pacritinib when given together with sirolimus and tacrolimus and to see how well they work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with blood cancer undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving pacritinib, sirolimus, and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Sirolimus in Preventing Invasive Breast Cancer in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Lobular Carcinoma In Situ, Atypical Lobular Hyperplasia, or Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus works in preventing invasive breast cancer in patients with breast cancer confined to the mammary ducts or lobules of the breast. Sirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas