Clinical Trials to Treat Adult Metastatic Brain Tumors

Trials 1-25 of 79
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  • Cisplatin with or without Veliparib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Triple-Negative and / or BRCA Mutation-Associated Breast Cancer with or without Brain Metastases

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin works with or without veliparib in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer and / or BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer that has come back or has or has not spread to the brain. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known if cisplatin is more effective with or without veliparib in treating patients with triple-negative and / or BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer.
    Location: 759 locations

  • Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery with or without Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients with Brain Metastasis from HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery with or without lapatinib ditosylate works in treating patients with breast cancer that has too many of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on its cells and has spread to the brain. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery together with lapatinib ditosylate is an effective treatment for brain metastasis from breast cancer.
    Location: 205 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery or Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with 5-15 Brain Metastases

    This phase III trial studies stereotactic radiosurgery to see how well it works compared to whole-brain radiation therapy in treating participants with 5-15 brain tumors that have spread from other places in the body. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Whole-brain radiation therapy delivers radiation to the entire brain. It is not yet known whether stereotactic radiosurgery or whole-brain radiation therapy works better in treating participants with 5-15 brain metastases.
    Location: 19 locations

  • Effect of TTFields (150 kHz) in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients With 1-10 Brain Metastases Following Radiosurgery (METIS)

    The study is a prospective, randomized controlled phase III trial, to test the efficacy, safety and neurocognitive outcomes of advanced NSCLC patients, following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for 1-10 brain metastases, treated with NovoTTF-100M compared to supportive treatment alone. The device is an experimental, portable, battery operated device for chronic administration of alternating electric fields (termed TTFields or TTF) to the region of the malignant tumor, by means of surface, insulated electrode arrays.
    Location: 22 locations

  • A Study of Etirinotecan Pegol (NKTR-102) Versus Treatment of Physician's Choice (TPC) in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Have Stable Brain Metastases and Have Been Previously Treated With an Anthracycline, a Taxane, and Capecitabine

    This is an open-label, randomized, active comparator, multicenter, international Phase 3 study of NKTR-102 versus TPC in patients with metastatic breast cancer who have stable brain metastases and have been previously treated with an anthracycline, a taxane, and capecitabine in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting (prior anthracycline may be omitted if medically appropriate or contraindicated for the patient).
    Location: 13 locations

  • Osimertinib with or without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with EGFR Positive Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well osimertinib with or without bevacizumab works in treating patients with EGFR positive non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to the brain. Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving osimertinib with or without bevacizumab may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Phase 1 / 2 Study of LOXO-195 in Patients With Previously Treated NTRK Fusion Cancers

    This is a Phase 1 / 2, multi-center, open-label study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of LOXO-195 when administered orally to patients age ≥ 1 month and older with NTRK fusion cancers treated with a prior TRK inhibitor.
    Location: 11 locations

  • VX-970 and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Brain Metastases from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Neuroendocrine Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ATR kinase inhibitor M6620 (VX-970) when given together with whole brain radiation therapy in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, or neuroendocrine tumors that have spread from the original (primary) tumor to the brain. ATR kinase inhibitor M6620 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving ATR kinase inhibitor M6620 together with radiation therapy may be a better treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, or neuroendocrine tumors.
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Study to Assess the Safety and Tolerability of AZD1390 Given With Radiation Therapy in Patients With Brain Cancer

    This study will test an investigational drug called AZD1390 in combination with radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors. This is the first time AZD1390 is being given to patients. This study will test safety, tolerability and PK (how the drug is absorbed, distributed and eliminated) of ascending doses of AZD1390 in combination with distinct regimens of radiation therapy
    Location: 6 locations

  • Sorafenib Tosylate and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of sorafenib tosylate when given together with whole brain radiation therapy in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to the brain. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving sorafenib tosylate and whole-brain radiation therapy together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Whole-Brain Radiotherapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with 5-20 Metastatic Malignant Tumors in the Brain

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well whole-brain radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with 5-20 malignant tumors that have spread to the brain from other parts of the body. Whole-brain radiotherapy delivers radiation to the entire brain Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue. It is not yet known whether whole-brain radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery works better in treating patients with 5-20 malignant tumors in the brain.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Frameless Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation in Treating Patients with Brain Metastases

    This phase II trial studies the safety and efficacy of frameless fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases. Frameless fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers 3 to 5, high dose fractions of radiation directly to the brain lesions while sparing normal tissues.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Small Cell Cancer and 1-6 Brain Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with small cell cancer and 1-6 tumors that have spread to the brain from other parts of the body. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pembrolizumab with or without Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Central Nervous System Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab with or without stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving pembrolizumab and stereotactic radiosurgery may work better in treating patients with cancer that has spread to the central nervous system.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Melanoma or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Brain

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of giving pembrolizumab together with stereotactic radiosurgery to treat patients with melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to the brain. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving pembrolizumab together with stereotactic radiosurgery may be a better treatment for patients with melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to the brain.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pre-Operative or Post-Operative Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Operative Metastatic Brain Tumors

    This phase III trial studies the side effects and how well stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) works before or after surgery in patients with tumors that has spread to the brain or that can be removed by surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Stereotactic Radiation in Treating Participants with Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Brain Metastasis

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and stereotactic radiosurgery work in treating participants with stage IV triple negative breast cancer that has spread to the brain. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic radiation is a specialized radiation therapy that uses many precisely focused radiation beams to treat tumors with minimal impact on the surrounding healthy tissue. Giving atezolizumab and stereotactic radiation may work better in treating participant with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Pertuzumab, and High-Dose Trastuzumab in Treating Participants with Her2-Positive Breast Cancer with Central Nervous System Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works when given together with pertuzumab and high-dose trastuzumab in treating participants with HER2-positive breast cancer that have spread to the central nervous system from other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, pertuzumab and trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, may induce changes in body’s immune system, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Dendritic Cell Vaccine and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This pilot early phase I trial studies the side effects of a dendritic cell vaccine when given with gemcitabine hydrochloride and to see how well they work in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other organs in the body. The vaccine is made up of natural cells found in the blood, called dendritic cells, and peptides, or small fragments of protein which are loaded onto the dendritic cells. This combination may help activate the immune system against stromal cells, which are cells that help cancer cells survive in the body. Gemcitabine hydrochloride is a chemotherapy drug that is given before the vaccine to help shrink the tumor and control cells that may interfere with the activity of the vaccine. Interfering with the stromal cells that help support the growth of cancer cells may lead to the death of the cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Phase II Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Ceritinib in Patients With ALK-positive NSCLC Metastatic to the Brain and / or to Leptomeninges

    This is a phase II, multi-center, open-label, five-arm study in which the efficacy and safety of oral ceritinib treatment will be assessed in patients with NSCLC metastatic to the brain and / or to leptomeninges harboring a confirmed ALK rearrangement, using the FDA approved Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular Inc.) test and scoring algorithm (including positivity criteria). If documentation of ALK rearrangement as described above is not locally available, a test to confirm ALK rearrangement must be performed by a Novartis designated central laboratory. Patients must wait for the central laboratory result of the ALK rearrangement status before initiating treatment with ceritinib.
    Location: 2 locations

  • PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well intensity modulated radiation therapy adjusted by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning together with combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with stage II-IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy, multiple beam angles and dozens of beam segments are used to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving PET-adjusted IMRT together with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Immunotherapy Using Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    Background: - The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy that involves taking white blood cells from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, or TIL and we have given this type of treatment to over 400 patients with melanoma. - In this trial, we are determining if there is a difference in the response between patients who have received prior anti-PD1 treatment to those who have not received this prior ant-PD1 treatment. Objectives: - To determine if there is a difference in the rate of response between patients who have received prior anti-PD1 and those who have not. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years and less than or equal to 70 years of age who have metastatic melanoma. Design: - Work up stage: Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. Blood and urine samples will be collected. - Surgery: Surgery or biopsy will be performed to obtain tumor from which to grow white blood cells. White blood cells will be grown from the tumor in the laboratory. - Leukapheresis: Participants will have leukapheresis to collect additional white blood cells. (Leukapheresis is a common procedure which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.) - Treatment: Participants will receive standard dose chemotherapy to prepare their immune system to accept the white blood cells. Participants will receive an infusion of their own white blood cells grown from tumor. They will also receive aldesleukin for up to five days to boost the immune system s response to the white blood cells. They will stay in the hospital for about 4 weeks for the treatment. - Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking. Follow up visits take up to 2 days.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Immunotherapy Using Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy that involves taking white blood cells from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, or TIL and we have given this type of treatment to over 200 patients with melanoma. Researchers want to know if TIL shrink s tumors in people with digestive tract, urothelial, breast, or ovarian / endometrial cancers. In this study, we are selecting a specific subset of white blood cells from the tumor that we think are the most effective in fighting tumors and will use only these cells in making the tumor fighting cells. Objective: The purpose of this study is to see if these specifically selected tumor fighting cells can cause digestive tract, urothelial, breast, or ovarian / endometrial tumors to shrink and to see if this treatment is safe. Eligibility: - Adults age 18-70 with metastatic digestive tract, urothelial, breast, or ovarian / endometrial cancer who have a tumor that can be safely removed. Design: Work up stage: Patients will be seen as an outpatient at the NIH clinical Center and undergo a history and physical examination, scans, x-rays, lab tests, and other tests as needed. Surgery: If the patients meet all of the requirements for the study they will undergo surgery to remove a tumor that can be used to grow the TIL product. Leukapheresis: Patients may undergo leukapheresis to obtain additional white blood cells. {Leukapheresis is a common procedure, which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.} Treatment: Once their cells have grown, the patients will be admitted to the hospital for the conditioning chemotherapy, the TIL cells and aldesleukin. They will stay in the hospital for about 4 weeks for the treatment. Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking. Follow up visits will take up to 2 days.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiation and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer That Has Spread to the Brain

    This phase Ib trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery and nivolumab work in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to the brain. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving stereotactic radiosurgery and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to the brain.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12D Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy takes white blood cells from a person, grows them in a lab, genetically changes them, then gives them back to the person. Researchers think this may help attack tumors in people with certain cancers. It is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells are safe and cause tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults ages 18-70 who have cancer with a molecule on the tumors that can be recognized by the study cells Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, scans, photography, and heart, lung, and lab tests. An intravenous (IV) catheter will be placed in a large vein in the chest. Participants will have leukapheresis. Blood will be removed through a needle in an arm. A machine will divide the blood and collect white blood cells. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant through a needle in the other arm. A few weeks later, participants will have a hospital stay. They will: - Get 2 chemotherapy medicines by IV over 5 days. - Get the changed cells through the catheter. Get up to 9 doses of a medicine to help the cells. They may get a shot to stimulate blood cells. - Recover in the hospital for up to 3 weeks. They will provide blood samples. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have several follow-up visits over 2 years. They will repeat most of the screening tests and may have leukapheresis. Participants blood will be collected for several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland


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