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Global Cancer Research and Control Seminar Series

This seminar series features talks by researchers and cancer control experts working in global oncology. The seminars provide opportunities for discussion and collaboration around impactful and innovative work that addresses cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide.    

Upcoming Seminars

Breast Cancer Survival in Sub-Saharan Africa 

May 4th, 2021| 9:00 a.m. ET

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Picture of Valerie McCormack, PhD

Valerie McCormack, PhD

Valerie McCormack, PhD
Environment and Lifestyle Epidemiology Branch
International agency for Research on Cancer, France

Picture of Steady Chasimpha, MSc

Steady Chasimpha, MSc

Steady Chasimpha, MSc
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health 
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

Dr. Valerie McCormack and Mr. Steady Chasimpha are epidemiologists based at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine respectively. Their research is focused mostly on cancer epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa, including on cancers contributing to excessive premature mortality in the region. This work includes contextual studies of the reasons – biological, societal and health systems – for low breast cancer survival as well as etiological research on esophageal cancer. The African Breast Cancer Disparities in Outcomes study (ABC-DO) is a breast cancer cohort initiated in 2014 across 5 Sub-Saharan African countries and has quantified the factors that need to be tackled to avoid breast cancers. The study also provides unique information on quality of life and the intergenerational impact of cancer deaths.
 

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